Leonard James Keyworth ["Tales of the V.C."], item 3

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supplies a long way; the defenders have them ready at their

hands.

  But he soon solved that problem. He determined to stand on the parapet.

That we would certainly be killed did not weigh with

him at all. He could throw further - that was all that

mattered. Down below he had had cover of a sort. Up there

on the parapet he was an easy target for every German

sniper and bomber within range.

  By some strange chance however he was not hit at all. He stood

on that parapet for two whole hours, continuously throwing

the bombs which his comrades passed up to him from below.

In that time he threw nearly 200. That he was not

killed is a wonderful thing; that he held out for so long

without dropping from sheer physical exhaustion is almost

more wonderful, as anyone who has bowled a cricket-ball

through a long summer afternoon can well realise - and a

bomb weighs a pound and a half, not five ounces!

  But there is a limit to human endurance. At last the

time came when even he could do no more; and he

staggered down from his place on the parapet.

  Afterwards, when he had partially recovered his strength, he

made a gallant attempt to rescue one of his officers, who

had been mortally wounded and was lying on the German

parapet, but the dying officer waved him away when he

approached, as the enemy's fire was so heavy that it

would have been certain death to have tried to reach him.

----------

Transcription saved

supplies a long way; the defenders have them ready at their

hands.

  But he soon solved that problem. He determined to stand on the parapet.

That we would certainly be killed did not weigh with

him at all. He could throw further - that was all that

mattered. Down below he had had cover of a sort. Up there

on the parapet he was an easy target for every German

sniper and bomber within range.

  By some strange chance however he was not hit at all. He stood

on that parapet for two whole hours, continuously throwing

the bombs which his comrades passed up to him from below.

In that time he threw nearly 200. That he was not

killed is a wonderful thing; that he held out for so long

without dropping from sheer physical exhaustion is almost

more wonderful, as anyone who has bowled a cricket-ball

through a long summer afternoon can well realise - and a

bomb weighs a pound and a half, not five ounces!

  But there is a limit to human endurance. At last the

time came when even he could do no more; and he

staggered down from his place on the parapet.

  Afterwards, when he had partially recovered his strength, he

made a gallant attempt to rescue one of his officers, who

had been mortally wounded and was lying on the German

parapet, but the dying officer waved him away when he

approached, as the enemy's fire was so heavy that it

would have been certain death to have tried to reach him.

----------


Transcription history
  • January 18, 2018 04:03:41 Thomas A. Lingner

    supplies a long way; the defenders have them ready at their

    hands.

      But he soon solved that problem. He determined to stand on the parapet.

    That we would certainly be killed did not weigh with

    him at all. He could throw further - that was all that

    mattered. Down below he had had cover of a sort. Up there

    on the parapet he was an easy target for every German

    sniper and bomber within range.

      By some strange chance however he was not hit at all. He stood

    on that parapet for two whole hours, continuously throwing

    the bombs which his comrades passed up to him from below.

    In that time he threw nearly 200. That he was not

    killed is a wonderful thing; that he held out for so long

    without dropping from sheer physical exhaustion is almost

    more wonderful, as anyone who has bowled a cricket-ball

    through a long summer afternoon can well realise - and a

    bomb weighs a pound and a half, not five ounces!

      But there is a limit to human endurance. At last the

    time came when even he could do no more; and he

    staggered down from his place on the parapet.

      Afterwards, when he had partially recovered his strength, he

    made a gallant attempt to rescue one of his officers, who

    had been mortally wounded and was lying on the German

    parapet, but the dying officer waved him away when he

    approached, as the enemy's fire was so heavy that it

    would have been certain death to have tried to reach him.

    ----------


Description

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  • 50.5289395||2.757408400000031||

    Givenchy

    ||1
Location(s)
  • Story location Givenchy


ID
5456 / 60675
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
Jeremy Arter
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



  • Western Front

  • Propaganda
  • Trench Life



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