Jorgan Christian Jensen ["Tales of the V.C."], item 10

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occupants to come out quietly and surrender or to take the

consequences.

  He must have presented rather a terrifying 

appearance as he stood there at the door of the dug-out. He

had one bomb in his hand, and was engaged in pulling out the

safety pin of another with his teeth. At any rate, the Germans

inside were very soon persuaded that discretion was the more

profitable policy, and they filed out meekly to surrender to 

their captor. Perhaps the fate of their late comrade had

impressed them.

  Another member of Pte. Jensen's party had by now 

arrived, and was standing on the barricade with a bomb in his hand

A few more Germans, on emerging from another dug-out a little 

further along the trench, were greeted by this uncompromising

spectacle, and also decided that they could do no better than

surrender. Accordingly they dropped their rifles and joined

their comrades, who were now gathering around Pte. Jensen with

their hands up.

  Jensen, who could speak a little German, ordered

one of his prisoners to go across to the party on the right

and inform them that they were already surrounded by Australians.

This embassy was successful, and the German

returned with the news that the whole party was willing to

surrender.

  But the adventure was not quite over. Some 

of the Australians who now came suddenly upon the Germans for

the first time, were unaware that they had thrown down their

arms, and prepared to open fire upon them. Pte. Jensen, with

the same sense of chivalry that had prompted him to withhold his

fire earlier in the day, at once mounted the barricade, at great

risk to himself, and waved his helmet. The signal was seen

 and

Transcription saved

occupants to come out quietly and surrender or to take the

consequences.

  He must have presented rather a terrifying 

appearance as he stood there at the door of the dug-out. He

had one bomb in his hand, and was engaged in pulling out the

safety pin of another with his teeth. At any rate, the Germans

inside were very soon persuaded that discretion was the more

profitable policy, and they filed out meekly to surrender to 

their captor. Perhaps the fate of their late comrade had

impressed them.

  Another member of Pte. Jensen's party had by now 

arrived, and was standing on the barricade with a bomb in his hand

A few more Germans, on emerging from another dug-out a little 

further along the trench, were greeted by this uncompromising

spectacle, and also decided that they could do no better than

surrender. Accordingly they dropped their rifles and joined

their comrades, who were now gathering around Pte. Jensen with

their hands up.

  Jensen, who could speak a little German, ordered

one of his prisoners to go across to the party on the right

and inform them that they were already surrounded by Australians.

This embassy was successful, and the German

returned with the news that the whole party was willing to

surrender.

  But the adventure was not quite over. Some 

of the Australians who now came suddenly upon the Germans for

the first time, were unaware that they had thrown down their

arms, and prepared to open fire upon them. Pte. Jensen, with

the same sense of chivalry that had prompted him to withhold his

fire earlier in the day, at once mounted the barricade, at great

risk to himself, and waved his helmet. The signal was seen

 and


Transcription history
  • October 21, 2018 19:56:32 Sarika Jain

    occupants to come out quietly and surrender or to take the

    consequences.

      He must have presented rather a terrifying 

    appearance as he stood there at the door of the dug-out. He

    had one bomb in his hand, and was engaged in pulling out the

    safety pin of another with his teeth. At any rate, the Germans

    inside were very soon persuaded that discretion was the more

    profitable policy, and they filed out meekly to surrender to 

    their captor. Perhaps the fate of their late comrade had

    impressed them.

      Another member of Pte. Jensen's party had by now 

    arrived, and was standing on the barricade with a bomb in his hand

    A few more Germans, on emerging from another dug-out a little 

    further along the trench, were greeted by this uncompromising

    spectacle, and also decided that they could do no better than

    surrender. Accordingly they dropped their rifles and joined

    their comrades, who were now gathering around Pte. Jensen with

    their hands up.

      Jensen, who could speak a little German, ordered

    one of his prisoners to go across to the party on the right

    and inform them that they were already surrounded by Australians.

    This embassy was successful, and the German

    returned with the news that the whole party was willing to

    surrender.

      But the adventure was not quite over. Some 

    of the Australians who now came suddenly upon the Germans for

    the first time, were unaware that they had thrown down their

    arms, and prepared to open fire upon them. Pte. Jensen, with

    the same sense of chivalry that had prompted him to withhold his

    fire earlier in the day, at once mounted the barricade, at great

    risk to himself, and waved his helmet. The signal was seen

     and

  • October 21, 2018 19:55:33 Sarika Jain

    occupants to come out quietly and surrender or to take the

    consequences.

      He must have presented rather a terrifying 

    appearance as he stood there at the door of the dug-out. He

    had one bomb in his hand, and was engaged in pulling out the

    safety pin of another with his teeth. At any rate, the Germans

    inside were very soon persuaded that discretion was the more

    profitable policy, and they filed out meekly to surrender to 

    their captor. Perhaps the fate of their late comrade had

    impressed them.

      Another member of Pte. Jensen's party had by now 

    arrived, and was standing on the barricade with a bomb in his hand

    A few more Germans, on emerging from another dug-out a little 

    further along the trench, were greeted by this uncompromising

    spectacle, and also decided that they could do no better than

    surrender. Accordingly they dropped their rifles and joined

    their comrades, who were now gathering around Pte. Jensen with

    their hands up.

      Jensen, who could speak a little German, ordered

    one of his prisoners to go across to the party on the right

    and inform them that they were already surrounded by Australians.

    This embassy was successful, and the German

    returned with the news that the whole party was willing to

    surrender.

      But the adventure was not quite over. Some 

    of the Australians who now came suddenly upon the Germans for

    the first time, were unaware that they had thrown down their

    arms, and prepared to open fire upon them. Pte. Jensen, with

    the same sense of chivalry that had prompted him to withhold his

    fire earlier in the day, at once mounted the barricade, at great

    risk to himself, and waved his helmet. The signal was seen

     and


  • January 24, 2018 01:19:56 Thomas A. Lingner

    occupants to come out quietly and surrender or to take the

    consequences.

      He must have presented rather a terrifying 

    appearance as he stood there at the door of the dug-out. He

    had one bomb in his hand, and was engaged in pulling out the

    safety pin of another with his teeth. At any rate, the Germans

    inside were very soon persuaded that discretion was the more

    profitable policy, and they filed out meekly to surrender to 

    their captor. Perhaps the fate of their late comrade had

    impressed them.

      Another member of Pte. Jensen's party had by now 

    arrived, and was standing on the barricade with a bomb in his hand

    A few more Germans, on emerging from another dug-out a little 

    further along the trench, were greeted by this uncompromising

    spectacle, and also decided that they could do no better than

    surrender. Accordingly they dropped their rifles and joined

    their comrades, who were now gathering around Pte. Jensen with

    their hands up.

      Jensen, who could speak a little German, ordered

    one of his prisoners to go across to the party on the right

    and inform that they were already surrounded by Australians.

      But the adventure was not quite over. Some 

    of the Australians who now came suddenly upon the Germans for

    the first time, were unaware that they had thrown down their

    arms, and prepared to open fire upon them. Pte. Jensen, with

    the same sense of chivalry that had prompted him to withhold his

    fire earlier in the day, at once mounted the barricade, at great

    risk to himself, and waved his helmet. The signal was seen

     and


  • January 24, 2018 01:19:35 Thomas A. Lingner

    occupants to come out quietly and surrender or to take the

    consequences.

      He must have presented rather a terrifying 

    appearance as he stood there at the door of the dug-out. He

    had one bomb in his hand, and was engaged in pulling out the

    safety pin of another with his teeth. At any rate, the Germans

    inside were very soon persuaded that discretion was the more

    profitable policy, and they filed out meekly to surrender to 

    their captor. Perhaps the fate of their late comrade had

    impressed them.

      Another member of Pte. Jensen's party had by now 

    arrived, and was standing on the barricade with a bomb in his hand

    A few more Germans, on emerging from another dug-out a little 

    further along the trench, were greeted by this uncompromising

    spectacle, and also decided that they could do no better than

    surrender. Accordingly they dropped their rifles and joined

    their comrades, who were now gathering around Pte. Jensen with

    their hands up.

      Jensen, who could speak a little German, ordered

    one of his prisoners to go across to the party on the right

    and inform that they were already surrounded by Australians.

      But the adventure was not quite over. Some 

    of the Australians who now came suddenly upon the Germans for

    the first time, were unaware that they had thrown down their

    arms, and prepared to open fire upon them. Pte. Jensen, with

    the same sense of chivalry that had prompted him to withhold his

    fire earlier in the day, at once mounted the barricade, at great

    risk to himself, and waved his helmet. The signal was seen

    and


Description

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Location(s)
  • Story location


ID
5394 / 60362
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
Jeremy Arter
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



  • Western Front

  • Prisoners of War
  • Propaganda
  • Remembrance
  • Trench Life



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