A young soldier from Oxfordshire, item 15

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 Printed extract from a book  

42 ¦ Chapter Three


The first battle lasted from 19th October to the 22nd of November 1914, when the 

Oxford and Bucks counter-attacked and ended the German effort.  There were 50,000

British and 50,000 French and Belgian and 150,000 German Casualties.


The battle must have had a chastening effect on the young recruit's enthusiasm.  The first

and second battle of Ypres (22nd April to 25th May 1915) were fought with the Allies

under the control of General French, who was then relieved of the command.  He was

believed to be too old at sixty-three to adapt himself to modern warfare.


In 1915 Percy John's training was proceeding and movement to the battlefield

imminent.


29 Jan. 1915 [Postcard]

Dear Mother

Do not expect me as I do not know if I can get off.  But if I cannot I will send so goodbye 

all   John


He must have spent some time at home as there is an undated postcard announcing his

arrival back at camp.


On 22nd February 1915 he wrote from Cranleigh, Surrey to Flo in Malaya.

My dear Sister,

Thanks for letter.  We are still here.  Its about 6 miles from Chiddingfold and about 4

from Dunsfold, and Godalming, where are big guns are, at the later, and we are often

round Dunsfold, and Alfold, I don't think we do any fighting, now, as they say our guns

are not ready, till the end of April, and then a month in France, before we go to the

Front.  I shall try to get home, on pass, on my birthday, if I can has it might be the last

in England.  We can have passes from Saturday till Sunday midnight, and we get back

Tuesday night, wich is alright with only two days pay stop, wich is nothing, and glad to

get out of the rank for a bit, and don't call me a man, when I am only a boy of eighteen,

and not that yet.

Our Battalion Commander is gone to France, to get ready for us.  But I might so on with

my trade, for the Batt. as they have taken my name for it, and then I may stop in it then,

I shall never go home, if dad comes back.  I shall be lost for ever.  But don't tell mother, I

shall never stand for it after, what she is going now, and to see it all pulled un done again,

don't tell her, has if I cross the Channel and bout there, I hear I is home, I shall never

return.  So must say Goodbye Your Affect brother  John Franklin

Transcription saved

 Printed extract from a book  

42 ¦ Chapter Three


The first battle lasted from 19th October to the 22nd of November 1914, when the 

Oxford and Bucks counter-attacked and ended the German effort.  There were 50,000

British and 50,000 French and Belgian and 150,000 German Casualties.


The battle must have had a chastening effect on the young recruit's enthusiasm.  The first

and second battle of Ypres (22nd April to 25th May 1915) were fought with the Allies

under the control of General French, who was then relieved of the command.  He was

believed to be too old at sixty-three to adapt himself to modern warfare.


In 1915 Percy John's training was proceeding and movement to the battlefield

imminent.


29 Jan. 1915 [Postcard]

Dear Mother

Do not expect me as I do not know if I can get off.  But if I cannot I will send so goodbye 

all   John


He must have spent some time at home as there is an undated postcard announcing his

arrival back at camp.


On 22nd February 1915 he wrote from Cranleigh, Surrey to Flo in Malaya.

My dear Sister,

Thanks for letter.  We are still here.  Its about 6 miles from Chiddingfold and about 4

from Dunsfold, and Godalming, where are big guns are, at the later, and we are often

round Dunsfold, and Alfold, I don't think we do any fighting, now, as they say our guns

are not ready, till the end of April, and then a month in France, before we go to the

Front.  I shall try to get home, on pass, on my birthday, if I can has it might be the last

in England.  We can have passes from Saturday till Sunday midnight, and we get back

Tuesday night, wich is alright with only two days pay stop, wich is nothing, and glad to

get out of the rank for a bit, and don't call me a man, when I am only a boy of eighteen,

and not that yet.

Our Battalion Commander is gone to France, to get ready for us.  But I might so on with

my trade, for the Batt. as they have taken my name for it, and then I may stop in it then,

I shall never go home, if dad comes back.  I shall be lost for ever.  But don't tell mother, I

shall never stand for it after, what she is going now, and to see it all pulled un done again,

don't tell her, has if I cross the Channel and bout there, I hear I is home, I shall never

return.  So must say Goodbye Your Affect brother  John Franklin


Transcription history
  • October 29, 2018 12:57:28 Stella Watkin

     Printed extract from a book  

    42 ¦ Chapter Three


    The first battle lasted from 19th October to the 22nd of November 1914, when the 

    Oxford and Bucks counter-attacked and ended the German effort.  There were 50,000

    British and 50,000 French and Belgian and 150,000 German Casualties.


    The battle must have had a chastening effect on the young recruit's enthusiasm.  The first

    and second battle of Ypres (22nd April to 25th May 1915) were fought with the Allies

    under the control of General French, who was then relieved of the command.  He was

    believed to be too old at sixty-three to adapt himself to modern warfare.


    In 1915 Percy John's training was proceeding and movement to the battlefield

    imminent.


    29 Jan. 1915 [Postcard]

    Dear Mother

    Do not expect me as I do not know if I can get off.  But if I cannot I will send so goodbye 

    all   John


    He must have spent some time at home as there is an undated postcard announcing his

    arrival back at camp.


    On 22nd February 1915 he wrote from Cranleigh, Surrey to Flo in Malaya.

    My dear Sister,

    Thanks for letter.  We are still here.  Its about 6 miles from Chiddingfold and about 4

    from Dunsfold, and Godalming, where are big guns are, at the later, and we are often

    round Dunsfold, and Alfold, I don't think we do any fighting, now, as they say our guns

    are not ready, till the end of April, and then a month in France, before we go to the

    Front.  I shall try to get home, on pass, on my birthday, if I can has it might be the last

    in England.  We can have passes from Saturday till Sunday midnight, and we get back

    Tuesday night, wich is alright with only two days pay stop, wich is nothing, and glad to

    get out of the rank for a bit, and don't call me a man, when I am only a boy of eighteen,

    and not that yet.

    Our Battalion Commander is gone to France, to get ready for us.  But I might so on with

    my trade, for the Batt. as they have taken my name for it, and then I may stop in it then,

    I shall never go home, if dad comes back.  I shall be lost for ever.  But don't tell mother, I

    shall never stand for it after, what she is going now, and to see it all pulled un done again,

    don't tell her, has if I cross the Channel and bout there, I hear I is home, I shall never

    return.  So must say Goodbye Your Affect brother  John Franklin


  • October 29, 2018 12:51:35 Stella Watkin

     Printed extract from a book  

    42 ¦ Chapter Three


    The first battle lasted from 19th October to the 22nd of November 1914, when the 

    Oxford and Bucks counter-attacked and ended the German effort.  There were 50,000

    British and 50,000 French and Belgian and 150,000 German Casualties.


    The battle must have had a chastening effect on the young recruit's enthusiasm.  The first

    and second battle of Ypres (22nd April to 25th May 1915) were fought with the Allies

    under the control of General French, who was then relieved of the command.  He was

    believed to be too old at sixty-three to adapt himself to modern warfare.


    In 1915 Percy John's training was proceeding and movement to the battlefield

    imminent.


    29 Jan [Postcard]

    Dear Mother

    Do not expect me as I do not know if I can get off.  But if I cannot I will send so goodbye 

    all   John


    He must have spent some time at home as there is an undated postcard announcing his

    arrival back at camp.


    On 22nd February 1915 he wrote from Cranleigh, Surrey to Flo in Malaya.

    My dear Sister,

    Thanks for letter.  We are still here.  Its about 6 miles from Chiddingfold and about 4

    from Dunsfold, and Godalming, where are big guns are, at the later, and we are often

    round Dunsfold, and Alfold, I don't think we do any fighting, now, as they say our guns

    are not ready, till the end of April, and then a month in France, before we go to the

    Front.  I shall try to get home, on pass, on my birthday, if I can has it might be the last

    in England.  We can have passes from Saturday till Sunday midnight, and we get back

    Tuesday night, wich is alright with only two days pay stop, wich is nothing, and glad to

    get out of the rank for a bit, and don't call me a man, when I am only a boy of eighteen,

    and not that yet.

    Our Battalion Commander is gone to France, to get ready for us.  But I might so on with

    my trade, for the Batt. as they have taken my name for it, and then I may stop in it then,

    I shall never go home, if dad comes back.  I shall be lost for ever.  But don't tell mother, I

    shall never stand for it after, what she is going now, and to see it all pulled un done again,

    don't tell her, has if I cross the Channel and bout there, I hear I is home, I shall never

    return.  So must say Goodbye Your Affect brother  John Franklin


Description

Save description
  • 51.111281||-0.628183||

    Chiddingfold, Surrey, United Kingdom

  • 51.141073||-0.483985||

    Cranleigh, Surrey, United Kingdom

  • 51.7548472||-1.397158300000001||

    Stanton Harcourt, England

    ||1
Location(s)
  • Story location Stanton Harcourt, England
  • Document location Chiddingfold, Surrey, United Kingdom
  • Additional document location Cranleigh, Surrey, United Kingdom


ID
5117 / 64139
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
Peter Franklin
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


January 29, 1915





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