Captain/Major Harold Ward Correspondence, item 486

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I believe some officers have been out

over two years without a visit home.

I am pleased to hear that K

says his Daddy loves him. He

has a good memory. Thank Mary

for her amusing literary effort. 

  I wonder what we chiefly consider

the horror of war. At home I suppose

it is the huge loss of life &

the destruction of towns & villages.

Out here those things do not

count nearly so much. Some I 

suppose think of the terrific noise

& the danger from shells. Drum-

fire is like hell let loose and

on sight it would appear that

no living thing in the zone

of fire could escape. Yet when

the shell storm passes men

rise up smiling. Some consider

the continuous whistle of the

machine gun - especially when

the bullets come in a continuous

Transcription saved

I believe some officers have been out

over two years without a visit home.

I am pleased to hear that K

says his Daddy loves him. He

has a good memory. Thank Mary

for her amusing literary effort. 

  I wonder what we chiefly consider

the horror of war. At home I suppose

it is the huge loss of life &

the destruction of towns & villages.

Out here those things do not

count nearly so much. Some I 

suppose think of the terrific noise

& the danger from shells. Drum-

fire is like hell let loose and

on sight it would appear that

no living thing in the zone

of fire could escape. Yet when

the shell storm passes men

rise up smiling. Some consider

the continuous whistle of the

machine gun - especially when

the bullets come in a continuous


Transcription history
  • December 24, 2018 05:48:44 Thomas A. Lingner

    I believe some officers have been out

    over two years without a visit home.

    I am pleased to hear that K

    says his Daddy loves him. He

    has a good memory. Thank Mary

    for her amusing literary effort. 

      I wonder what we chiefly consider

    the horror of war. At home I suppose

    it is the huge loss of life &

    the destruction of towns & villages.

    Out here those things do not

    count nearly so much. Some I 

    suppose think of the terrific noise

    & the danger from shells. Drum-

    fire is like hell let loose and

    on sight it would appear that

    no living thing in the zone

    of fire could escape. Yet when

    the shell storm passes men

    rise up smiling. Some consider

    the continuous whistle of the

    machine gun - especially when

    the bullets come in a continuous

Description

Save description
  • 50.1107922||3.0859058999999434||

    Havrincourt, Ribecourt-la-Tour,

    ||1
Location(s)
  • Story location Havrincourt, Ribecourt-la-Tour,


ID
5037 / 56859
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
Kate Ward
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


September 25, 1917
  • English

  • Western Front




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