Captain/Major Harold Ward Correspondence, item 161

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 left side  

away at 7:30 am for a Brigade Parade for

presentation of medals &c. that have been

awarded to some of the officers & men. When

I woke this morning it was pouring with 

rain. We got on parade & then the parade 

was put off for an hour. It is still

raining - a good heavy warm summer rain.

What I really object to is getting up early

when I had arranged to stay in bed until

8:30 am. I wonder if you have had your

early morning cup of tea & whether Kenneth

is saying "Up Mommy" yet? Yesterday

I envied some of our battalions that are

under canvas but to-day I am pleased

that I have a billet in a house that

keeps the water out. I had a walk round

our garden yesterday & I see that we shall

be able to have stewed gooseberries in about

two more days. I thought it would be very

nice to be at home "pottering about" in the

garden. Does Kenneth still ride in Jack's 

little motor car or has he tired of it and

allowed Jack to come into his own. Blanchard

 right side  

may have said that the "end is near" but he

knows much less than I do and I 

cannot find one single known fact that

supports the statement. I don't doubt but that

the countries are sick of war and are getting

anxious about conditions after the declaration of

peace. Russia according to the newspapers

is very rocky. On the other hand if one

believed the papers one would say that

half the people in France are starving & that

conditions in England were deplorable; what

with "food hogs" "food shortages" "ships sunk"

"strikes" &c. all in bold type for the

encouragement of the Boche. Fortunately the

English are not such fools as the papers

make out and although the strike crowds 

the war news into a corner there is a 

magnificent army fighting for the

country, enduring hardships cheerfully

& doing nobly. Every day a score of

battles are fought - any one of which

would put into the shade the

bloodiest battle of the South African War

Transcription saved

 left side  

away at 7:30 am for a Brigade Parade for

presentation of medals &c. that have been

awarded to some of the officers & men. When

I woke this morning it was pouring with 

rain. We got on parade & then the parade 

was put off for an hour. It is still

raining - a good heavy warm summer rain.

What I really object to is getting up early

when I had arranged to stay in bed until

8:30 am. I wonder if you have had your

early morning cup of tea & whether Kenneth

is saying "Up Mommy" yet? Yesterday

I envied some of our battalions that are

under canvas but to-day I am pleased

that I have a billet in a house that

keeps the water out. I had a walk round

our garden yesterday & I see that we shall

be able to have stewed gooseberries in about

two more days. I thought it would be very

nice to be at home "pottering about" in the

garden. Does Kenneth still ride in Jack's 

little motor car or has he tired of it and

allowed Jack to come into his own. Blanchard

 right side  

may have said that the "end is near" but he

knows much less than I do and I 

cannot find one single known fact that

supports the statement. I don't doubt but that

the countries are sick of war and are getting

anxious about conditions after the declaration of

peace. Russia according to the newspapers

is very rocky. On the other hand if one

believed the papers one would say that

half the people in France are starving & that

conditions in England were deplorable; what

with "food hogs" "food shortages" "ships sunk"

"strikes" &c. all in bold type for the

encouragement of the Boche. Fortunately the

English are not such fools as the papers

make out and although the strike crowds 

the war news into a corner there is a 

magnificent army fighting for the

country, enduring hardships cheerfully

& doing nobly. Every day a score of

battles are fought - any one of which

would put into the shade the

bloodiest battle of the South African War


Transcription history
  • December 11, 2018 18:11:33 Thomas A. Lingner

     left side  

    away at 7:30 am for a Brigade Parade for

    presentation of medals &c. that have been

    awarded to some of the officers & men. When

    I woke this morning it was pouring with 

    rain. We got on parade & then the parade 

    was put off for an hour. It is still

    raining - a good heavy warm summer rain.

    What I really object to is getting up early

    when I had arranged to stay in bed until

    8:30 am. I wonder if you have had your

    early morning cup of tea & whether Kenneth

    is saying "Up Mommy" yet? Yesterday

    I envied some of our battalions that are

    under canvas but to-day I am pleased

    that I have a billet in a house that

    keeps the water out. I had a walk round

    our garden yesterday & I see that we shall

    be able to have stewed gooseberries in about

    two more days. I thought it would be very

    nice to be at home "pottering about" in the

    garden. Does Kenneth still ride in Jack's 

    little motor car or has he tired of it and

    allowed Jack to come into his own. Blanchard

     right side  

    may have said that the "end is near" but he

    knows much less than I do and I 

    cannot find one single known fact that

    supports the statement. I don't doubt but that

    the countries are sick of war and are getting

    anxious about conditions after the declaration of

    peace. Russia according to the newspapers

    is very rocky. On the other hand if one

    believed the papers one would say that

    half the people in France are starving & that

    conditions in England were deplorable; what

    with "food hogs" "food shortages" "ships sunk"

    "strikes" &c. all in bold type for the

    encouragement of the Boche. Fortunately the

    English are not such fools as the papers

    make out and although the strike crowds 

    the war news into a corner there is a 

    magnificent army fighting for the

    country, enduring hardships cheerfully

    & doing nobly. Every day a score of

    battles are fought - any one of which

    would put into the shade the

    bloodiest battle of the South African War

  • December 11, 2018 18:09:48 Thomas A. Lingner

    left side

    away at 7:30 am for a Brigade Parade for

    presentation of medals &c. that have been

    awarded to some of the officers & men. When

    I woke this morning it was pouring with 

    rain. We got on parade & then the parade 

    was put off for an hour. It is still

    raining - a good heavy warm summer rain.

    What I really object to is getting up early

    when I had arranged to stay in bed until

    8:30 am. I wonder if you have had your

    early morning cup of tea & whether Kenneth

    is saying "Up Mommy" yet? Yesterday

    I envied some of our battalions that are

    under canvas but to-day I am pleased

    that I have a billet in a house that

    keeps the water out. I had a walk round

    our garden yesterday & I see that we shall

    be able to have stewed gooseberries in about

    two more days. I thought it would be very

    nice to be at home "pottering about" in the

    garden. Does Kenneth still ride in Jack's 

    little motor car or has he tired of it and

    allowed Jack to come into his own. Blanchard

    right side

    may have said that the "end is near" but he

    knows much less than I do and I 

    cannot find one single known fact that

    supports the statement. I don't doubt but that

    the countries are sick of war and are getting

    anxious about conditions after the declaration of

    peace. Russia according to the newspapers

    is very rocky. On the other hand if one

    believed the papers one would say that

    half the people in France are starving & that

    conditions in England were deplorable; what

    with "food hogs" "food shortages" "ships sunk"

    "strikes" &c. all in bold type for the

    encouragement of the Boche. Fortunately the

    English are not such fools as the papers

    make out and although the strike crowds 

    the war news into a corner there is a 

    magnificent army fighting for the

    country, enduring hardships cheerfully

    & doing nobly. Every day a score of

    battles are fought - any one of which

    would put into the shade the

    bloodiest battle of the South African War


Description

Save description
  • 50.1107922||3.0859058999999434||

    Havrincourt, Ribecourt-la-Tour,

    ||1
Location(s)
  • Story location Havrincourt, Ribecourt-la-Tour,


ID
5037 / 56531
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
Kate Ward
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


May 22, 1917
  • English

  • Western Front




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