Captain/Major Harold Ward Correspondence, item 57

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28/3/17

My Own Darling Wife,

  Many thanks for your letter

of the 21st. I believe my last letter was

one I sent on the 23rd. On the morning of

the 26th we left our rest camp & marched 

forward to the ruins of a village - about

six miles. I went early on Sally another 

six miles farther forward to look at our

new positions so I was fairly tired at

night. Had a good night's rest in my 

clothes & then on again next day. We

arrived at our village-that-used-to-be about

noon expecting to stay for some days. We

made ourselves very comfortable but early

next morning the order to move came; so 

in an hour we were tracking again.

Unfortunately the rain was falling quickly

& it was very cold. My hands & feet

were awfully cold, but I didn't get off & 

walk as my saddle would have got

too wet & I knew I should probably have

plenty to do later in the day. We had a 

meal in the rain by the roadside just

outside another ruin & then I pushed

off to look at the ground where my

men were to be for some time.

Imagine very open country with big

windswept ridges & no cover & you

can guess how nice it appeared in

the rain. I was going hard for about three

hours & then posted the men in position

an hour after that I was again ordered

to move & this time we had more 

luck for we had only to go a mile

Transcription saved

28/3/17

My Own Darling Wife,

  Many thanks for your letter

of the 21st. I believe my last letter was

one I sent on the 23rd. On the morning of

the 26th we left our rest camp & marched 

forward to the ruins of a village - about

six miles. I went early on Sally another 

six miles farther forward to look at our

new positions so I was fairly tired at

night. Had a good night's rest in my 

clothes & then on again next day. We

arrived at our village-that-used-to-be about

noon expecting to stay for some days. We

made ourselves very comfortable but early

next morning the order to move came; so 

in an hour we were tracking again.

Unfortunately the rain was falling quickly

& it was very cold. My hands & feet

were awfully cold, but I didn't get off & 

walk as my saddle would have got

too wet & I knew I should probably have

plenty to do later in the day. We had a 

meal in the rain by the roadside just

outside another ruin & then I pushed

off to look at the ground where my

men were to be for some time.

Imagine very open country with big

windswept ridges & no cover & you

can guess how nice it appeared in

the rain. I was going hard for about three

hours & then posted the men in position

an hour after that I was again ordered

to move & this time we had more 

luck for we had only to go a mile


Transcription history
  • December 7, 2018 20:20:50 Thomas A. Lingner

    28/3/17

    My Own Darling Wife,

      Many thanks for your letter

    of the 21st. I believe my last letter was

    one I sent on the 23rd. On the morning of

    the 26th we left our rest camp & marched 

    forward to the ruins of a village - about

    six miles. I went early on Sally another 

    six miles farther forward to look at our

    new positions so I was fairly tired at

    night. Had a good night's rest in my 

    clothes & then on again next day. We

    arrived at our village-that-used-to-be about

    noon expecting to stay for some days. We

    made ourselves very comfortable but early

    next morning the order to move came; so 

    in an hour we were tracking again.

    Unfortunately the rain was falling quickly

    & it was very cold. My hands & feet

    were awfully cold, but I didn't get off & 

    walk as my saddle would have got

    too wet & I knew I should probably have

    plenty to do later in the day. We had a 

    meal in the rain by the roadside just

    outside another ruin & then I pushed

    off to look at the ground where my

    men were to be for some time.

    Imagine very open country with big

    windswept ridges & no cover & you

    can guess how nice it appeared in

    the rain. I was going hard for about three

    hours & then posted the men in position

    an hour after that I was again ordered

    to move & this time we had more 

    luck for we had only to go a mile

Description

Save description
  • 50.1107922||3.0859058999999434||

    Havrincourt, Ribecourt-la-Tour,

    ||1
Location(s)
  • Story location Havrincourt, Ribecourt-la-Tour,


ID
5037 / 56299
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
Kate Ward
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


March 28, 1917
  • English

  • Western Front




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