Letter 26th December 1914, item 3

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after our night, though there were some sore heads in the morning,

and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

and marched off at 7 p.m.    We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

morning, and it started to rain.   We had a halt for two hours

at a place called Merville, then we went on again till 5 p.m. on

Monday night when we reached the town of Belhure (Bailleul ). We billeted

in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

we shifted to our new billets, we went out to collect the wounded

about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !   It was

three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

 we were up and down that road till 5 a.m. the next morning for we

had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soon as they are into

the Firing Line charged the enemy and capture Five Tranches, so

we had plenty of work, and it was still raining, so we had a fine

night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

in the dark, you might be sniped at.  These snipers are usually

up a tree, and fire at the stretcher bearers, or the cookers that

bring the food up to the trenches at night.   To give you an idea

what it was really like without a lie, three of the Gloucesters

were drowned in the mud and water in one of the trenches, and they

were not wounded before they were drowned.   The Country is terrible

flat here. It was dark, and nobody could get near them, and the

mud held them like a bog.   Our Terriers are sticking it like heroes.

The two in our ambulance stuck it along with the rest, though five

of our men had to be carried to the Ambulance with Rheumatism.

After wandering through the water the whole night, I went into one

Transcription saved

after our night, though there were some sore heads in the morning,

and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

and marched off at 7 p.m.    We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

morning, and it started to rain.   We had a halt for two hours

at a place called Merville, then we went on again till 5 p.m. on

Monday night when we reached the town of Belhure (Bailleul ). We billeted

in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

we shifted to our new billets, we went out to collect the wounded

about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !   It was

three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

 we were up and down that road till 5 a.m. the next morning for we

had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soon as they are into

the Firing Line charged the enemy and capture Five Tranches, so

we had plenty of work, and it was still raining, so we had a fine

night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

in the dark, you might be sniped at.  These snipers are usually

up a tree, and fire at the stretcher bearers, or the cookers that

bring the food up to the trenches at night.   To give you an idea

what it was really like without a lie, three of the Gloucesters

were drowned in the mud and water in one of the trenches, and they

were not wounded before they were drowned.   The Country is terrible

flat here. It was dark, and nobody could get near them, and the

mud held them like a bog.   Our Terriers are sticking it like heroes.

The two in our ambulance stuck it along with the rest, though five

of our men had to be carried to the Ambulance with Rheumatism.

After wandering through the water the whole night, I went into one


Transcription history
  • December 23, 2016 20:47:01 Frank Drauschke (F&F)

    after our night, though there were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.    We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.   We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, then we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached the town of Belhure (Bailleul ). We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new billets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !   It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 a.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soon as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enemy and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was still raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

    usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

    in the dark, you might be sniped at.  These snipers are usually

    up a tree, and fire at the stretcher bearers, or the cookers that

    bring the food up to the trenches at night.   To give you an idea

    what it was really like without a lie, three of the Gloucesters

    were drowned in the mud and water in one of the trenches, and they

    were not wounded before they were drowned.   The Country is terrible

    flat here. It was dark, and nobody could get near them, and the

    mud held them like a bog.   Our Terriers are sticking it like heroes.

    The two in our ambulance stuck it along with the rest, though five

    of our men had to be carried to the Ambulance with Rheumatism.

    After wandering through the water the whole night, I went into one

  • December 23, 2016 19:46:14 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though there were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.    We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.   We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, then we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached the town of Belhure (Bailleul ). We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new billets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !   It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soon as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enemy and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was still raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

    usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

    in the dark, you might be sniped at.  These snipers are usually

    up at tree, and fire at the stretcher bearers, or the cookers that

    bring the food up to the trenches at night.   To give you an idea

    what it was really like without a lie, three of the Gloucesters

    were drowned in the mud and water in one of the trenches, and they

    were not wounded before they were wounded.   The Country is terrible

    flat here. It was dark, and nobody could get near them, and the

    mud held them like a bog.   Our Terriers are sticking it like heroes.

    The two in our ambulance stuck it along with the rest, though five

    of our men had to be carried to the Ambulance with Rheumatism.

    After wandering through the water the whole nigth, I went into one


  • December 23, 2016 19:45:05 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though there were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.    We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.   We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, then we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached the town of Belhure (Bailleul). We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new billets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !   It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soon as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enemy and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was still raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

    usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

    in the dark, you might be sniped at.  These snipers are usually

    up at tree, and fire at the stretcher bearers, or the cookers that

    bring the food up to the trenches at night.   To give you an idea

    what it was really like without a lie, three of the Gloucesters

    were drowned in the mud and water in one of the trenches, and they

    were not wounded before they were wounded.   The Country is terrible

    flat here. It was dark, and nobody could get near them, and the

    mud held them like a bog.   Our Terriers are sticking it like heroes.

    The two in our ambulance stuck it along with the rest, though five

    of our men had to be carried to the Ambulance with Rheumatism.

    After wandering through the water the whole nigth, I went into one


  • December 22, 2016 23:28:40 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached the town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soo as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enem y and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was stille raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

    usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

    in the dark, you might be sniped at.    These snipers are usually

    up at tree, and fire at the stretcher bearers, or the cookers that

    bring the food up to the trenches at night.   To give you an idea

    what it was really like without a lie, three of the Gloucesters

    were drowned in the mud and water in one of the trenches, and they

    were not wounded before they were wounded.   The Country is terrible

    flat here. It was dark, and nobody could get near them, and the

    mud held them like a bog.    Our Terriers are sticking it like heroes.

    The two in our ambulance stuck it along with the rest, though five

    of our men had to be carried to the Ambulance with Rheumatism.

    After wandering through the water the whole nigth, I went into one


  • December 22, 2016 22:46:21 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soo as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enem y and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was stille raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

    usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

    in the dark, you might be sniped at.    These snipers are usually

    up at tree, and fire at the stretcher bearers, or the cookers that

    bring the food up to the trenches at night.   To give you an idea

    what it was really like without a lie, three of the Gloucesters

    were drowned in the mud and water in one of the trenches, and they

    were not wounded before they were wounded.   The Country is terrible

    flat here. It was dark, and nobody could get near them, and the

    mud held them like a bog.    Our Terriers are sticking it like heroes.

    The two in our ambulance stuck it along with the rest, though five

    of our men had to be carried to the Ambulance with Rheumatism.

    After wandering through the water the whole nigth, I went into one


  • December 22, 2016 22:45:25 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soo as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enem y and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was stille raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

    usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

    in the dark, you might be sniped at.    These snipers are usually

    up at tree, and fire at the stretcher bearers, or the cookers that

    bring the food up to the trenches at night.   To give you an idea

    what it was really like without a lie, three of the Gloucesters

    were drowned in the mud and water in one of the trenches, and they

    were not wounded before they were wounded.   The Country is terrible

    flat here. It was dark, and nobody could get near them, and the

    mud held them like a bog.    Our Terriers are sticking it like heroes.

    The two in our ambulance stuck it along with the rest, though five

    of our men had to be carried to the Ambulance with Rheumatism.


  • December 22, 2016 22:44:37 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soo as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enem y and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was stille raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

    usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

    in the dark, you might be sniped at.    These snipers are usually

    up at tree, and fire at the stretcher bearers, or the cookers that

    bring the food up to the trenches at night.   To give you an idea

    what it was really like without a lie, three of the Gloucesters

    were drowned in the mud and water in one of the trenches, and they

    were not wounded before they were wounded.   The Country is terrible

    flat here. It was dark, and nobody could get near them, and the

    mud held them like a bog.    Our Terriers are sticking it like heroes.

    The two in our ambulance stuck it along with the rest, though five


  • December 22, 2016 22:42:32 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soo as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enem y and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was stille raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

    usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

    in the dark, you might be sniped at.    These snipers are usually

    up at tree, and fire at the stretcher bearers, or the cookers that

    bring the food up to the trenches at night.   To give you an idea

    what it was really like without a lie, three of the Gloucesters

    were drowned in the mud and water in one of the trenches, and they

    were not wounded before they were wounded.   The Country is terrible

    flat here. It was dark, and nobody could get near them, and the

    mud held thel like a bog.


  • December 22, 2016 22:39:39 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soo as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enem y and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was stille raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

    usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

    in the dark, you might be sniped at.    These snipers are usually

    up at tree, and fire at the stretcher bearers, or the cookers that

    bring the food up to the trenches at night.   To give you an idea

    what it was really like without a lie, three of the Gloucesters

    were drowned in the mud and water in one of the trenches, and they

     


  • December 22, 2016 22:38:59 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soo as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enem y and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was stille raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

    usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

    in the dark, you might be sniped at.    These snipers are usually

    up at tree, and fire at the stretcher bearers, or the cookers that

    bring the food up to the trenches at night.   To give you an idea

    what it was really like without a lie, tree of the Gloucesters


  • December 22, 2016 22:38:13 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soo as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enem y and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was stille raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

    usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

    in the dark, you might be sniped at.    These snipers are usually

    up at tree, and fire at the stretcher bearers, or the cookers that

    bring the food up to the trenches at night.   To give you an idea


  • December 22, 2016 22:37:34 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soo as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enem y and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was stille raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

    usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

    in the dark, you might be sniped at.    These snipers are usually

    up at tree, and fire at the stretcher bearers, or the cookers that


  • December 22, 2016 22:36:55 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soo as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enem y and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was stille raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

    usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

    in the dark, you might be sniped at.    These snipers are usually


  • December 22, 2016 22:36:08 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soo as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enem y and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was stille raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

    usual sniping at us, for if you go up any road near the Firing Line

     


  • December 22, 2016 22:35:12 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soo as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enem y and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was stille raining, so we had a fine

    night for our first one back in the Firing Line, and we had the

     

     


  • December 22, 2016 22:34:05 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soo as they are into

    the Firing Line charged the enem y and capture Five Tranches, so

    we had plenty of work, and it was stille raining, so we had a fine

     


  • December 22, 2016 22:32:41 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

    had a great many wounded as our Brigade as soo as they are into

     


  • December 22, 2016 22:31:42 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three feet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     we were up and down that road till 5 p.m. the next morning for we

     


  • December 22, 2016 22:30:38 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three fet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road was 5 feet, and some 7 feet deep.   Well

     

     


  • December 22, 2016 22:29:44 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three fet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that

    some parts of the road w

     


  • December 22, 2016 22:29:12 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about 11 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was

    three fet deep in water, and the road was full of holes, so that


  • December 22, 2016 22:28:32 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded

    about &1 p.m. and oh, what a road to carry wounded down !     It was


  • December 22, 2016 22:27:34 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After

    we shifted to our new illets, we went out to collect the wounded


  • December 22, 2016 22:26:43 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

    we moved nearer the Firing Line to a village called Borre. It is

    Under shell fire, but the Germans are very quiet just now. After


  • December 22, 2016 22:25:34 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian

    Troops. They are going back for a few weeks rest. Next night

     


  • December 22, 2016 22:24:39 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the

    First Division was to relieve the 8th Division that is the Indian


  • December 22, 2016 22:23:29 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the

    Trenches to relieve the Indian Troops, so we discovered that the


  • December 22, 2016 22:22:43 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted

    in a barn for the night, and all the Infantry went right up to the


  • December 22, 2016 22:20:37 Marie-Jo Lécuyer
  • December 22, 2016 22:17:30 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on

    Monday night when we reached te town of Belhure. We billeted


  • December 22, 2016 22:17:00 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

    at a place called Merville, the we went on again till 5 p.m. on


  • December 22, 2016 22:16:11 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marched on till 2 a.m. in the

    morning, and it started to rain.     We had a halt for two hours

     

     


  • December 22, 2016 22:15:17 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started

    when along came an order to fall in at once, so we had to pack up

    and marched off at 7 p.m.                     We marches on till 2 a.m. in the

     


  • December 22, 2016 22:13:59 Marie-Jo Lécuyer

    after our night, though ther were some sore heads in the morning,

    and on the Sunday I was going to write to you, and had just started


Description

Save description
  • 50.736482||2.73559||

    Bailleul

  • 50.71242530190354||2.6838745291138366||

    Outersteene

  • 50.642989||2.639274||

    Merville

  • 50.7312619||2.5849054999999908||

    Borre

    ||1
Location(s)
  • Story location Borre
  • Document location Bailleul
  • Additional document location Outersteene
  • Additional document location Merville
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ID
4420 / 243672
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
James McFarlane
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


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Login to edit the fronts
  • Western Front

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  • Medical
  • Trench Life

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Notes and questions

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  1. Certains noms de lieu sont mal orthographiés. Est-il possible – comme je l’ai fait dans le texte transcrit – de les écrire en français à côté et entre parenthèses pour que les futurs lecteurs retrouvent ces lieux de mémoire ?

    show replies
    • Yes please mark them as such and also add Geo-tags on the map. In this case I am not sure, if Belhur really is Bailleul, since they marched from Outersteene via Merville, Belhure to Borre, which would mean they had to do quite some diversions, which of course might have been needed.