POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 166

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                                                              79.

                                CONSTANCE

We walked down to the station a mixed party of English French &

Belgians (about 3 of each) At the station we had something like

half an hours wait. It was rather pleasing to look at the

electric lights of the camp in the distance & to think that in all

probability it was the last time that my eyes would be offended

with the sight. The Journey to Contance was a night mare.

Caiper took us as far as Wilderman. There we were joined by

a German Lieutenant who took us the rest of the journey.

He spoke French & English & I think did his best for us.

We started about 6 p.m. on the 14th,, and arrived somewhere

about midday on the 16th.. We changed I think 13 times

on the way. We spent 6 hours of the night of the 14 - 15th..

in the ladies waiting room at CASSAL.  After a long wait

at another spot where we had beer & had our money

given us. We had a midday halt in FRANKFORT and

spent sunday hours of the night 15th-16th.. in a red cross.

hut at a place where name I have forgotten. For food

on the journey we were allowed to patronage the station

restaurants. There we obtained potatoes in some guise

or another, coffee (so called) and perhaps beer. I presume

the 15th.. December was a meatless day for there was no

meat on any of the menus. I noticed notices about

being careful not to waiste potatoes put up in the

stations in Hanover. Also in every station & train

notices to soldiers to look out for spies these they could

tell from their speech. All the large stations were

filled with soldiers of different ages and ranks coming home

I presume for a Christmas Furlough. There was no emnity

to the English such as I saw at the commencement of the


Transcription saved

                                                              79.

                                CONSTANCE

We walked down to the station a mixed party of English French &

Belgians (about 3 of each) At the station we had something like

half an hours wait. It was rather pleasing to look at the

electric lights of the camp in the distance & to think that in all

probability it was the last time that my eyes would be offended

with the sight. The Journey to Contance was a night mare.

Caiper took us as far as Wilderman. There we were joined by

a German Lieutenant who took us the rest of the journey.

He spoke French & English & I think did his best for us.

We started about 6 p.m. on the 14th,, and arrived somewhere

about midday on the 16th.. We changed I think 13 times

on the way. We spent 6 hours of the night of the 14 - 15th..

in the ladies waiting room at CASSAL.  After a long wait

at another spot where we had beer & had our money

given us. We had a midday halt in FRANKFORT and

spent sunday hours of the night 15th-16th.. in a red cross.

hut at a place where name I have forgotten. For food

on the journey we were allowed to patronage the station

restaurants. There we obtained potatoes in some guise

or another, coffee (so called) and perhaps beer. I presume

the 15th.. December was a meatless day for there was no

meat on any of the menus. I noticed notices about

being careful not to waiste potatoes put up in the

stations in Hanover. Also in every station & train

notices to soldiers to look out for spies these they could

tell from their speech. All the large stations were

filled with soldiers of different ages and ranks coming home

I presume for a Christmas Furlough. There was no emnity

to the English such as I saw at the commencement of the



Transcription history
  • June 29, 2017 19:17:05 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                  79.

                                    CONSTANCE

    We walked down to the station a mixed party of English French &

    Belgians (about 3 of each) At the station we had something like

    half an hours wait. It was rather pleasing to look at the

    electric lights of the camp in the distance & to think that in all

    probability it was the last time that my eyes would be offended

    with the sight. The Journey to Contance was a night mare.

    Caiper took us as far as Wilderman. There we were joined by

    a German Lieutenant who took us the rest of the journey.

    He spoke French & English & I think did his best for us.

    We started about 6 p.m. on the 14th,, and arrived somewhere

    about midday on the 16th.. We changed I think 13 times

    on the way. We spent 6 hours of the night of the 14 - 15th..

    in the ladies waiting room at CASSAL.  After a long wait

    at another spot where we had beer & had our money

    given us. We had a midday halt in FRANKFORT and

    spent sunday hours of the night 15th-16th.. in a red cross.

    hut at a place where name I have forgotten. For food

    on the journey we were allowed to patronage the station

    restaurants. There we obtained potatoes in some guise

    or another, coffee (so called) and perhaps beer. I presume

    the 15th.. December was a meatless day for there was no

    meat on any of the menus. I noticed notices about

    being careful not to waiste potatoes put up in the

    stations in Hanover. Also in every station & train

    notices to soldiers to look out for spies these they could

    tell from their speech. All the large stations were

    filled with soldiers of different ages and ranks coming home

    I presume for a Christmas Furlough. There was no emnity

    to the English such as I saw at the commencement of the


  • June 29, 2017 19:14:26 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                  79.

                                    CONSTANCE

    We walked down to the station a mixed party of English French &

    Belgians (about 3 of each) At the station we had something like

    half an hours wait. It was rather pleasing to look at the

    electric lights of the camp in the distance & to think that in all

    probability it was the last time that my eyes would be offended

    with the sight. The Journey to Contance was a night mare.

    Caiper took us as far as Wilderman. There we were joined by

    a German Lieutenant who took us the rest of the journey.

    He spoke French & English & I think did his best for us.

    We started about 6 p.m. on the 14th,, and arrived somewhere

    about midday on the 16th.. We changed I think 13 times

    on the way. We spent 6 hours of the night of the 14 - 15th..

    in the ladies waiting room at CASSAL.  After a long wait

    at another spot where we had beer & had our money

    given us. We had a midday halt in FRANKFORT and

    spent sunday hours of the night 15th-16th.. in a red cross.

    hut at a place where name I have forgotten. For food

    on the journey we were allowed to patronage the station

    restaurants. There we obtained potatoes in some guise

    or another, coffee (so called) and perhaps beer. I presume

    the 15th.. December was a meatless day for there was no

    meat on any of the menus. I noticed notices about

    being careful not to waiste potatoes put up in the

    stations in Hanover. Also in every station & train




  • June 29, 2017 19:08:37 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                  79.

                                    CONSTANCE

    We walked down to the station a mixed party of English French &

    Belgians (about 3 of each) At the station we had something like

    half an hours wait. It was rather pleasing to look at the

    electric lights of the camp in the distance & to think that in all

    probability it was the last time that my eyes would be offended

    with the sight. The Journey to Contance was a night mare.

    Caiper took us as far as Wilderman. There we were joined by

    a German Lieutenant who took us the rest of the journey.


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    ID
    3963 / 243475
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



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