POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 156

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                                    70.

had some gentlemanly instincts. Thus on a walk if no one

wished to speak to him & it was unlikely they did.- he was

quite satisfied to walk by himself. He was very consciencious

He came with another not a bad kind broad minded, but

he was out when the French escaped & soon left. Consul

went to the front in the summer 1916 followed by a new sort.

He was always in the camp, always nosing about. On

walks wanted  ...  to be talked to. Always [insert] seemed to [/insert] wanted

to be friendly. But he parted to find the perpetrators of

the tunnel & he left. He was followed by a person

hideously uglu very sluvenly , all body, short legs did not

see him long enough to form an opinion on him. At

any rate he was not always round the camp.

As to parcels- our parcels were fetched from the station by

the Guard in a handcart & were issued as a rule

promptly. For this a charge of 10 pps & 5 pps for a very little

one such as a box of cigarettes was made. This went as

backscheesh to the guard. This imposition was knocked

on the head  in the summer of 1916. The contents were compley

examined. One was not allowed to have the paper or the

box. All books were taken away & sent to Osnabrack to

be censored - this book as a rule 4 weeks- but in some

cases much longer. It was however possible to evade a

certain amount of searching & as a rule the Germans

in this office were reasonable . I missed quite a lot of

parcels from England- but whether they were looted in

Germany I dont know. Occasionally a parcel would

arrive damaged. This was shown with a X on the list

put up. Then you would be lucky if you received half

the original contents. In the autumn of 16 new regulations

Transcription saved

                                    70.

had some gentlemanly instincts. Thus on a walk if no one

wished to speak to him & it was unlikely they did.- he was

quite satisfied to walk by himself. He was very consciencious

He came with another not a bad kind broad minded, but

he was out when the French escaped & soon left. Consul

went to the front in the summer 1916 followed by a new sort.

He was always in the camp, always nosing about. On

walks wanted  ...  to be talked to. Always [insert] seemed to [/insert] wanted

to be friendly. But he parted to find the perpetrators of

the tunnel & he left. He was followed by a person

hideously uglu very sluvenly , all body, short legs did not

see him long enough to form an opinion on him. At

any rate he was not always round the camp.

As to parcels- our parcels were fetched from the station by

the Guard in a handcart & were issued as a rule

promptly. For this a charge of 10 pps & 5 pps for a very little

one such as a box of cigarettes was made. This went as

backscheesh to the guard. This imposition was knocked

on the head  in the summer of 1916. The contents were compley

examined. One was not allowed to have the paper or the

box. All books were taken away & sent to Osnabrack to

be censored - this book as a rule 4 weeks- but in some

cases much longer. It was however possible to evade a

certain amount of searching & as a rule the Germans

in this office were reasonable . I missed quite a lot of

parcels from England- but whether they were looted in

Germany I dont know. Occasionally a parcel would

arrive damaged. This was shown with a X on the list

put up. Then you would be lucky if you received half

the original contents. In the autumn of 16 new regulations


Transcription history
  • June 27, 2017 21:14:50 Annick Rodriguez

                                        70.

    had some gentlemanly instincts. Thus on a walk if no one

    wished to speak to him & it was unlikely they did.- he was

    quite satisfied to walk by himself. He was very consciencious

    He came with another not a bad kind broad minded, but

    he was out when the French escaped & soon left. Consul

    went to the front in the summer 1916 followed by a new sort.

    He was always in the camp, always nosing about. On

    walks wanted  ...  to be talked to. Always [insert] seemed to [/insert] wanted

    to be friendly. But he parted to find the perpetrators of

    the tunnel & he left. He was followed by a person

    hideously uglu very sluvenly , all body, short legs did not

    see him long enough to form an opinion on him. At

    any rate he was not always round the camp.

    As to parcels- our parcels were fetched from the station by

    the Guard in a handcart & were issued as a rule

    promptly. For this a charge of 10 pps & 5 pps for a very little

    one such as a box of cigarettes was made. This went as

    backscheesh to the guard. This imposition was knocked

    on the head  in the summer of 1916. The contents were compley

    examined. One was not allowed to have the paper or the

    box. All books were taken away & sent to Osnabrack to

    be censored - this book as a rule 4 weeks- but in some

    cases much longer. It was however possible to evade a

    certain amount of searching & as a rule the Germans

    in this office were reasonable . I missed quite a lot of

    parcels from England- but whether they were looted in

    Germany I dont know. Occasionally a parcel would

    arrive damaged. This was shown with a X on the list

    put up. Then you would be lucky if you received half

    the original contents. In the autumn of 16 new regulations

  • June 26, 2017 23:02:33 Annick Rodriguez

                                        70.

    had some gentlemanly instincts. Thus on a walk if no one

    wished to speak to him & it was 


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    ID
    3963 / 243465
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



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