POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 134

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                                                                              66.

The next room was also an English room & we had a common

verandah so now we were fairly comfortable. These verandahs

were now closed in. This recalls an incident in my first room

[insert] when we first arrived [/insert]

in those days the verandahs were open. I used to live next the

outer door. Every night I came up last & used to find the room

hermetrically sealed. I properly opened the door & slept in the

fresh air. Now of my companions the Belgian liked air but was

a great weak thing, the Frenchman did not mind it & the

Russian loathed it- but the Russian was the only man in

the Room. So there was bound to be a row. It came in the

first real frost when the thermometer went below zero[insert] Farenheit [/insert] Farnheit

and the Russian although he slept practically on the radiator

and burried his head in his bed clothes for ho sleep - Next

day he went to the Germans & said he was "preque fine",

Of course my room mates gave me no assistance. The [insert] Hun [/insert] Germans

issued an order that no window or door was to be open at

night. After that I had strange to say little trouble as the

door was always partly open. The inner wheels of the case

I dont know. I think the Russian went to a compatriot &

the compatriot complained. In any case he was all against

obeying a German order. Also it was never as cold again

whilst I was in that room as that night in Nov 1915.

I now come to two absolute  ...  attempts to get out of

the camp. The first originated in my friends brain I was

for us three to lie up in the tennis court & then cut the

wire & bolt. I had managed to steal a very fine wire

cutter belonging to the electrician. The plan was quite

feasible if it had not been for a loose dog in this

field. That dog was rather a savage beast. And to be

scouted was to be done. It meant for certain being shot.

Transcription saved

                                                                              66.

The next room was also an English room & we had a common

verandah so now we were fairly comfortable. These verandahs

were now closed in. This recalls an incident in my first room

[insert] when we first arrived [/insert]

in those days the verandahs were open. I used to live next the

outer door. Every night I came up last & used to find the room

hermetrically sealed. I properly opened the door & slept in the

fresh air. Now of my companions the Belgian liked air but was

a great weak thing, the Frenchman did not mind it & the

Russian loathed it- but the Russian was the only man in

the Room. So there was bound to be a row. It came in the

first real frost when the thermometer went below zero[insert] Farenheit [/insert] Farnheit

and the Russian although he slept practically on the radiator

and burried his head in his bed clothes for ho sleep - Next

day he went to the Germans & said he was "preque fine",

Of course my room mates gave me no assistance. The [insert] Hun [/insert] Germans

issued an order that no window or door was to be open at

night. After that I had strange to say little trouble as the

door was always partly open. The inner wheels of the case

I dont know. I think the Russian went to a compatriot &

the compatriot complained. In any case he was all against

obeying a German order. Also it was never as cold again

whilst I was in that room as that night in Nov 1915.

I now come to two absolute  ...  attempts to get out of

the camp. The first originated in my friends brain I was

for us three to lie up in the tennis court & then cut the

wire & bolt. I had managed to steal a very fine wire

cutter belonging to the electrician. The plan was quite

feasible if it had not been for a loose dog in this

field. That dog was rather a savage beast. And to be

scouted was to be done. It meant for certain being shot.


Transcription history
  • June 26, 2017 15:42:43 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                                  66.

    The next room was also an English room & we had a common

    verandah so now we were fairly comfortable. These verandahs

    were now closed in. This recalls an incident in my first room

    [insert] when we first arrived [/insert]

    in those days the verandahs were open. I used to live next the

    outer door. Every night I came up last & used to find the room

    hermetrically sealed. I properly opened the door & slept in the

    fresh air. Now of my companions the Belgian liked air but was

    a great weak thing, the Frenchman did not mind it & the

    Russian loathed it- but the Russian was the only man in

    the Room. So there was bound to be a row. It came in the

    first real frost when the thermometer went below zero[insert] Farenheit [/insert] Farnheit

    and the Russian although he slept practically on the radiator

    and burried his head in his bed clothes for ho sleep - Next

    day he went to the Germans & said he was "preque fine",

    Of course my room mates gave me no assistance. The [insert] Hun [/insert] Germans

    issued an order that no window or door was to be open at

    night. After that I had strange to say little trouble as the

    door was always partly open. The inner wheels of the case

    I dont know. I think the Russian went to a compatriot &

    the compatriot complained. In any case he was all against

    obeying a German order. Also it was never as cold again

    whilst I was in that room as that night in Nov 1915.

    I now come to two absolute  ...  attempts to get out of

    the camp. The first originated in my friends brain I was

    for us three to lie up in the tennis court & then cut the

    wire & bolt. I had managed to steal a very fine wire

    cutter belonging to the electrician. The plan was quite

    feasible if it had not been for a loose dog in this

    field. That dog was rather a savage beast. And to be

    scouted was to be done. It meant for certain being shot.

  • June 26, 2017 15:37:31 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                                  66.

    The next room was also an English room & we had a common

    verandah so now we were fairly comfortable. These verandahs

    were now closed in. This recalls an incident in my first room

    [insert] when we first arrived [/insert]

    in those days the verandahs were open. I used to live next the

    outer door. Every night I came up last & used to find the room

    hermetrically sealed. I properly opened the door & slept in the

    fresh air. Now of my companions the Belgian liked air but was

    a great weak thing, the Frenchman did not mind it & the

    Russian loathed it- but the Russian was the only man in

    the Room. So there was bound to be a row. It came in the

    first real frost when the thermometer went below zero[insert] Farenheit [/insert] Farnheit

    and the Russian although he slept practically on the radiator

    and burried his head in his bed clothes for ho sleep - Next

    day he went to the Germans & said he was "preque fine",

    Of course my room mates gave me no assistance. The [insert] Hun [/insert] Germans

    issued an order that no window or door was to be open at


  • June 23, 2017 18:38:25 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                                  66.

    The next room was also an English room & we had a common

    verandah so now we were fairly comfortable. These verandahs

    were noe 


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    ID
    3963 / 243443
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



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