POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 91

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                                                                              46.

accustomed to the prisoners, feeding on mice which

he caught  on the bank practically under our noses. It

was always a speculation when he made his pounce whether

he had struck a winner. He was a persistent devil &

I don't recall his ever having to go away without his

dinner. & [insert] in the end [/insert]

The system which the Germans now adopted was that under

the Admiral, Schornhorst was a company & had a captain

and a subaltern. The Captain there was the same whose

acquaintance I had first made at the Citadel. The subaltern

we called the chocolate soldier. I never really made him

out. He was a Baron somebody. Was always immaculately

dressed in a cavalry uniform. of bright colours. He had

bulldogs which he wanted to sell to the war prisoners.

He said he was only half a German & from his talk

often seemed to say more than he should. He was or tried

to be very friendly with the English. But I  wrongly perhaps 

mistrusted the German  half of him. We ate Wagonhaus

had a Captain and a subaltern but they have left

little impression on my mind. The chocolate soldier

was nominally at the head of the tennis & games

He made out he was a great blood.

My change to a new camp was a sudden one. It was

given out that a new camp was being formed at

Clausthal and a certain number of French & Belgians

were going. The chocolate soldier said it was a very

good place & he knew it well. The upshot was that

I and my mess applied to go. At first it was said

that it was impossible.

However at the time the English were in good favour


Transcription saved

                                                                              46.

accustomed to the prisoners, feeding on mice which

he caught  on the bank practically under our noses. It

was always a speculation when he made his pounce whether

he had struck a winner. He was a persistent devil &

I don't recall his ever having to go away without his

dinner. & [insert] in the end [/insert]

The system which the Germans now adopted was that under

the Admiral, Schornhorst was a company & had a captain

and a subaltern. The Captain there was the same whose

acquaintance I had first made at the Citadel. The subaltern

we called the chocolate soldier. I never really made him

out. He was a Baron somebody. Was always immaculately

dressed in a cavalry uniform. of bright colours. He had

bulldogs which he wanted to sell to the war prisoners.

He said he was only half a German & from his talk

often seemed to say more than he should. He was or tried

to be very friendly with the English. But I  wrongly perhaps 

mistrusted the German  half of him. We ate Wagonhaus

had a Captain and a subaltern but they have left

little impression on my mind. The chocolate soldier

was nominally at the head of the tennis & games

He made out he was a great blood.

My change to a new camp was a sudden one. It was

given out that a new camp was being formed at

Clausthal and a certain number of French & Belgians

were going. The chocolate soldier said it was a very

good place & he knew it well. The upshot was that

I and my mess applied to go. At first it was said

that it was impossible.

However at the time the English were in good favour



Transcription history
  • November 3, 2017 20:21:44 Thomas A. Lingner

                                                                                  46.

    accustomed to the prisoners, feeding on mice which

    he caught  on the bank practically under our noses. It

    was always a speculation when he made his pounce whether

    he had struck a winner. He was a persistent devil &

    I don't recall his ever having to go away without his

    dinner. & [insert] in the end [/insert]

    The system which the Germans now adopted was that under

    the Admiral, Schornhorst was a company & had a captain

    and a subaltern. The Captain there was the same whose

    acquaintance I had first made at the Citadel. The subaltern

    we called the chocolate soldier. I never really made him

    out. He was a Baron somebody. Was always immaculately

    dressed in a cavalry uniform. of bright colours. He had

    bulldogs which he wanted to sell to the war prisoners.

    He said he was only half a German & from his talk

    often seemed to say more than he should. He was or tried

    to be very friendly with the English. But I  wrongly perhaps 

    mistrusted the German  half of him. We ate Wagonhaus

    had a Captain and a subaltern but they have left

    little impression on my mind. The chocolate soldier

    was nominally at the head of the tennis & games

    He made out he was a great blood.

    My change to a new camp was a sudden one. It was

    given out that a new camp was being formed at

    Clausthal and a certain number of French & Belgians

    were going. The chocolate soldier said it was a very

    good place & he knew it well. The upshot was that

    I and my mess applied to go. At first it was said

    that it was impossible.

    However at the time the English were in good favour


  • June 27, 2017 14:32:20 Frank Drauschke (F&F)

                                                                                  46.

    accustomed to the prisoners,[insert] ans [/insert] He used to  feeding on mice which

    he caught  on the bank practically under our noses. It

    was always a speculation when he made his  ...  whether

    he had struck a winner. He was a persistent devil &

    I don't recall his ever having to go away without his

    dinner. & [insert] in the end [/insert]

    The system which the Germans now adopted was that under

    the Admiral, Schornhorst was a company & had a captain

    and a subaltern. The Captain there was the same whose

    acquaintance I had first made at the Citadel. The subaltern

    we called the chocolate soldier. I never really made him

    out. He was a Baron somebody. Was always immaculately

    dressed in a cavalry uniform. of bright colours. He had

    bulldogs which he wanted to sell to the war prisoners.

    He said he was only half a German & from his talk

    often seemed to say more than he should. He was or tried

    to be very friendly with the English. But I  wrongly perhaps 

    mistrusted the German  half of him. We ate Wagonhaus

    had a Captain and a subaltern but they have left

    little impression on my mind. The chocolate soldier

    was nominally at the head of the tennis & games

    He made out he was a great blood.

    My change to a new camp was a sudden one. It was

    given out that a new camp was being formed at

    Clausthal and a certain number of French & Belgians

    were going. The chocolate soldier said it was a very

    good place & he knew it well. The upshot was that

    I and my mess applied to go. At first it was said

    that it was impossible.

    However at the time the English were in good favour



  • June 22, 2017 17:20:32 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                                  46.

    accustomed to the prisoners,[insert] ans [/insert] He used to  feed[insert] ing [/insert]   on mice which

    he caught  on the bank practically under our noses. It

    was always a speculation when he made his  ...  whether

    he had struck a winner. He was a persistent devil &

    I don't recall his ever having to go away without his

    dinner. & [insert] in the end [/insert]

    The system which the Germans now adopted was that under

    the Admiral, Schornhorst was a company & had a captain

    and a subaltern. The Captain there was the same whose

    acquaintance I had first made at the Citadel. The subaltern

    we called the chocolate soldier. I never really made him

    out. He was a Baron somebody. Was always immaculately

    dressed in a cavalry uniform. of bright colours. He had

    bulldogs which he wanted to sell to the war prisoners.

    He said he was only half a German & from his talk

    often seemed to say more than he should. He was or tried

    to be very friendly with the English. But I  wrongly perhaps 

    mistrusted the German  half of him. We ate Wagonhaus

    had a Captain and a subaltern but they have left

    little impression on my mind. The chocolate soldier

    was nominally at the head of the tennis & games

    He made out he was a great blood.

    My change to a new camp was a sudden one. It was

    given out that a new camp was being formed at

    Clausthal and a certain number of French & Belgians

    were going. The chocolate soldier said it was a very

    good place & he knew it well. The upshot was that

    I and my mess applied to go. At first it was said

    that it was impossible.

    However at the time the English were in good favour



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    ID
    3963 / 243400
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



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