POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 73

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                                                                                           38.


Citadel

A pack of watch dogs were kept in a shed in what I call

the neutral ground.

The winter of 1914-1915 held on a long time.  The thaw being gradual, frost

by night +sun by day.  Easter passed with the usual amount

of bell ringing.  In April it was possible to sit out in the

sun + read.  In the beginning of May a great change took

place.  Apparently the new General took over command of the

Magdenburgh army corps.  He came round accompanied by a

large dog.  The immediate result of this visit was that we

were at once allowed to smoke and also to receive the

contents of our parcels.  It was the commencement of an

entirely new regime.  The neutral ground was to be opened

for both establishments.  We were to construct a tennis

court on it.  This work was almost immediately taken in

hand + was carried out by fatigue parties of the English.

In the mean time a wire fence was being put around the

neutral ground.  We did not commence work till the

outer ring was completed.  Until the completion of the court

this ground was closed.  But the sentries had the order

to pass all English out to work on the court.  Von

Gutz did not long survive the Generals visit.  He was

succeeded by the the Admiral.  I have no complaints to find

with him.  He did all in his power I think to ease our lot but of course when

officers escaped we were punished in the German way.  In

course of time my watch was returned.

The Citadel had now been abolished as being unsuitable

for a camp, and my brother officer missing had been sent to

various camps in Germany.  One of my two English room

mates was sent away + the other soon followed the

Transcription saved

                                                                                           38.


Citadel

A pack of watch dogs were kept in a shed in what I call

the neutral ground.

The winter of 1914-1915 held on a long time.  The thaw being gradual, frost

by night +sun by day.  Easter passed with the usual amount

of bell ringing.  In April it was possible to sit out in the

sun + read.  In the beginning of May a great change took

place.  Apparently the new General took over command of the

Magdenburgh army corps.  He came round accompanied by a

large dog.  The immediate result of this visit was that we

were at once allowed to smoke and also to receive the

contents of our parcels.  It was the commencement of an

entirely new regime.  The neutral ground was to be opened

for both establishments.  We were to construct a tennis

court on it.  This work was almost immediately taken in

hand + was carried out by fatigue parties of the English.

In the mean time a wire fence was being put around the

neutral ground.  We did not commence work till the

outer ring was completed.  Until the completion of the court

this ground was closed.  But the sentries had the order

to pass all English out to work on the court.  Von

Gutz did not long survive the Generals visit.  He was

succeeded by the the Admiral.  I have no complaints to find

with him.  He did all in his power I think to ease our lot but of course when

officers escaped we were punished in the German way.  In

course of time my watch was returned.

The Citadel had now been abolished as being unsuitable

for a camp, and my brother officer missing had been sent to

various camps in Germany.  One of my two English room

mates was sent away + the other soon followed the


Transcription history
  • June 21, 2017 03:35:55 L Brittain

                                                                                               38.


    Citadel

    A pack of watch dogs were kept in a shed in what I call

    the neutral ground.

    The winter of 1914-1915 held on a long time.  The thaw being gradual, frost

    by night +sun by day.  Easter passed with the usual amount

    of bell ringing.  In April it was possible to sit out in the

    sun + read.  In the beginning of May a great change took

    place.  Apparently the new General took over command of the

    Magdenburgh army corps.  He came round accompanied by a

    large dog.  The immediate result of this visit was that we

    were at once allowed to smoke and also to receive the

    contents of our parcels.  It was the commencement of an

    entirely new regime.  The neutral ground was to be opened

    for both establishments.  We were to construct a tennis

    court on it.  This work was almost immediately taken in

    hand + was carried out by fatigue parties of the English.

    In the mean time a wire fence was being put around the

    neutral ground.  We did not commence work till the

    outer ring was completed.  Until the completion of the court

    this ground was closed.  But the sentries had the order

    to pass all English out to work on the court.  Von

    Gutz did not long survive the Generals visit.  He was

    succeeded by the the Admiral.  I have no complaints to find

    with him.  He did all in his power I think to ease our lot but of course when

    officers escaped we were punished in the German way.  In

    course of time my watch was returned.

    The Citadel had now been abolished as being unsuitable

    for a camp, and my brother officer missing had been sent to

    various camps in Germany.  One of my two English room

    mates was sent away + the other soon followed the


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    ID
    3963 / 243382
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


    2017
    • English

    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



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