POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 61

Edit transcription:
...
Transcription saved
Enhance your transcribing experience by using full-screen mode

Transcription

You have to be logged in to transcribe. Please login or register and click the pencil-button again

                                                    32. 

At 8 a.m. there was an appel & we abd our kits were marched

to a kind of cellar. Besides my ring I had about a killo of

tobacco this was impossible to hide. Under the flour seemed the

obvious solution but the Frenchmans  ...  had made this

place a morass. Ultimately I left it in my cupboard never

expecting to see it again.

From the cellar we were marched one by one into the objectives

hands. After numerous indignities & poorer by 2 8 0 bits I got

back to my room at tea time. Our room was in a

beautiful state, bedding all over the place. The Germans had

been having a great time here. Right in the centre of the

floor was a tin box still full of French Louis. My tobacco

was untouched.  ... 

But the Germans had not I regret to say drawn altogether

blank. Many officers were caught in the cellar with all

their goods on them - they had believed the story of a move.

Now the Roman Catholics used this cellar to hold mass X oo

what more natural than to bury their gold. It was in

fact so natural that it struck the German Grain & he

dug next morning, to find a golden harvest.

But what they got was not a  ...  of what escaped them  ...  ... 

I now come to the incident of the window. This I think was

the cause of my being moved. The window at the far end of the

room was glazed  in order that one could not see out if it. Of

course holes had been scratched but ones view was limited.

One day I opened it wide. It looked out on to a dry

moat & had a big stone [insert] sell [/insert]still. Beyond was a field

& various buildings. This field was bounded by a

canal over which a foot bridge could be seen. Straight

in front was a sentry box & the sentries beat. Hearing


Transcription saved

                                                    32. 

At 8 a.m. there was an appel & we abd our kits were marched

to a kind of cellar. Besides my ring I had about a killo of

tobacco this was impossible to hide. Under the flour seemed the

obvious solution but the Frenchmans  ...  had made this

place a morass. Ultimately I left it in my cupboard never

expecting to see it again.

From the cellar we were marched one by one into the objectives

hands. After numerous indignities & poorer by 2 8 0 bits I got

back to my room at tea time. Our room was in a

beautiful state, bedding all over the place. The Germans had

been having a great time here. Right in the centre of the

floor was a tin box still full of French Louis. My tobacco

was untouched.  ... 

But the Germans had not I regret to say drawn altogether

blank. Many officers were caught in the cellar with all

their goods on them - they had believed the story of a move.

Now the Roman Catholics used this cellar to hold mass X oo

what more natural than to bury their gold. It was in

fact so natural that it struck the German Grain & he

dug next morning, to find a golden harvest.

But what they got was not a  ...  of what escaped them  ...  ... 

I now come to the incident of the window. This I think was

the cause of my being moved. The window at the far end of the

room was glazed  in order that one could not see out if it. Of

course holes had been scratched but ones view was limited.

One day I opened it wide. It looked out on to a dry

moat & had a big stone [insert] sell [/insert]still. Beyond was a field

& various buildings. This field was bounded by a

canal over which a foot bridge could be seen. Straight

in front was a sentry box & the sentries beat. Hearing



Transcription history
  • June 21, 2017 01:04:32 Annick Rodriguez

                                                        32. 

    At 8 a.m. there was an appel & we abd our kits were marched

    to a kind of cellar. Besides my ring I had about a killo of

    tobacco this was impossible to hide. Under the flour seemed the

    obvious solution but the Frenchmans  ...  had made this

    place a morass. Ultimately I left it in my cupboard never

    expecting to see it again.

    From the cellar we were marched one by one into the objectives

    hands. After numerous indignities & poorer by 2 8 0 bits I got

    back to my room at tea time. Our room was in a

    beautiful state, bedding all over the place. The Germans had

    been having a great time here. Right in the centre of the

    floor was a tin box still full of French Louis. My tobacco

    was untouched.  ... 

    But the Germans had not I regret to say drawn altogether

    blank. Many officers were caught in the cellar with all

    their goods on them - they had believed the story of a move.

    Now the Roman Catholics used this cellar to hold mass X oo

    what more natural than to bury their gold. It was in

    fact so natural that it struck the German Grain & he

    dug next morning, to find a golden harvest.

    But what they got was not a  ...  of what escaped them  ...  ... 

    I now come to the incident of the window. This I think was

    the cause of my being moved. The window at the far end of the

    room was glazed  in order that one could not see out if it. Of

    course holes had been scratched but ones view was limited.

    One day I opened it wide. It looked out on to a dry

    moat & had a big stone [insert] sell [/insert]still. Beyond was a field

    & various buildings. This field was bounded by a

    canal over which a foot bridge could be seen. Straight

    in front was a sentry box & the sentries beat. Hearing


  • June 21, 2017 00:56:29 Annick Rodriguez

                                                        32. 

    At 8 a.m. there was an appel & we abd our kits were marched

    to a kind of cellar. Besides my ring I had about a killo of

    tobacco this was impossible to hide. Under the flour seemed the

    obvious solution but the Frenchmans  ...  had made this

    place a morass. Ultimately I left it in my cupboard never

    expecting to see it again.

    From the cellar we were marched one by one into the objectives

    hands. After numerous indignities & poorer by 2 8 0 bits I got

    back to my room at tea time. Our room was in a

    beautiful state, bedding all over the place. The Germans had

    been having a great time here. Right in the centre of the

    floor was a tin box still full of French Louis. My tobacco

    was untouched.  ... 

    But the Germans had not I regret to say drawn altogether

    blank. Many officers were caught in the cellar with all

    their goods on them - they had believed the story of a move.

    Now the Roman Catholics used this cellar to hold mass X oo

    what more natural than to bury their gold. It was in

    fact so natural that it struck the German Grain & he

    dug next morning, to find a golden harvest.

    But what they got was not a  ...  of what escaped them  ...  ... 

    I now come to the incident of the window. This I think was

    the cause of my being moved. The window at the far end of the

    room was glazed  in order that one could not see out if it. Of

    course holes had been scratched but ones view was limited.

    One day I opened it wide. It looked out on to a dry

    moat & had a big stone still.



  • June 21, 2017 00:53:31 Annick Rodriguez

                                                        32. 

    At 8 a.m. there was an appel & we abd our kits were marched

    to a kind of cellar. Besides my ring I had about a killo of

    tobacco this was impossible to hide. Under the flour seemed the

    obvious solution but the Frenchmans  ...  had made this

    place a morass. Ultimately I left it in my cupboard never

    expecting to see it again.

    From the cellar we were marched one by one into the objectives

    hands. After numerous indignities & poorer by 2 8 0 bits I got

    back to my room at tea time. Our room was in a

    beautiful state, bedding all over the place. The Germans had

    been having a great time here. Right in the centre of the

    floor was a tin box still full of French Louis. My tobacco

    was untouched.  ... 

    But the Germans had not I regret to say drawn altogether

    blank. Many officers were caught in the cellar with all

    their goods on them - they had believed the story of a move.

    Now the Roman Catholics used this cellar to hold mass X oo

    what more natural than to bury their gold. It was in

    fact so natural that it struck the German Grain & he

    dug next morning, to find a golden harvest.

    But what they got was not a  ...  of what escaped them  ...  ... 

    I now come to the incident of the window. This I think was

    the cause of my being moved. The window at the far end of the

    room was 



Description

Save description
    Location(s)


    ID
    3963 / 243370
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



    Notes and questions

    Login to leave a note