POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 59

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                                                                     31.

nor do I to this day. [insert] Probably at the back of their minds was the idea that these might be used as bribery in an effort to escape. [/insert] They got my watch. I did not however

give them either my flask or my ring. 6 months later when

a new General came my watch was returned to me. My

flask I gave to a Doctor as they had a few priv[insert] i [/insert]eledges &

were allowed to keep these articles- & he ultimately took it

home. My ring went through two searches.

The first time I burried it in a piece of soap, but as there were professional

searches busy I was not quite happy. But a better way presented

itself. The search was long & we as usual last. So they had to

feed us- and the orderlies had been already searched. x The

next time it went through on my finger , and though I was

stripped naked they never thought of looking for it there.

Since those 2 days I have been through many searches &

always with some contrabrand and in every case they have

drawn blank. Later I had a suit of muffi ^[insert] a criminal offense [/insert] this was kept

just outside the commandants office. A map I kept in a

tin of sherbert and a pair of win cutters that I stole was

on the roof. As far as notes are concerned it would interest

their professionals to know that we English do not construct

the handles of our tennis ra[insert] c [/insert]quets like them. and in the

difference these is [insert] are [/insert]- well - many accounts of their little

pleasantries. But I am going on much to fast.  X

one evening much [insert] just [/insert]before New Year Our Belgian Friend learnt

from his German that there would be a great search

next day. At 6 a.m. we would be warmed that we would

be moved to another camp & must be ready at 8 with

all our kit packed- but he added you with not be

moved. During the night officers were busy hidding

things- and some fool Frenchmen were even up before

6 a.m. when the warning came.


Transcription saved

                                                                     31.

nor do I to this day. [insert] Probably at the back of their minds was the idea that these might be used as bribery in an effort to escape. [/insert] They got my watch. I did not however

give them either my flask or my ring. 6 months later when

a new General came my watch was returned to me. My

flask I gave to a Doctor as they had a few priv[insert] i [/insert]eledges &

were allowed to keep these articles- & he ultimately took it

home. My ring went through two searches.

The first time I burried it in a piece of soap, but as there were professional

searches busy I was not quite happy. But a better way presented

itself. The search was long & we as usual last. So they had to

feed us- and the orderlies had been already searched. x The

next time it went through on my finger , and though I was

stripped naked they never thought of looking for it there.

Since those 2 days I have been through many searches &

always with some contrabrand and in every case they have

drawn blank. Later I had a suit of muffi ^[insert] a criminal offense [/insert] this was kept

just outside the commandants office. A map I kept in a

tin of sherbert and a pair of win cutters that I stole was

on the roof. As far as notes are concerned it would interest

their professionals to know that we English do not construct

the handles of our tennis ra[insert] c [/insert]quets like them. and in the

difference these is [insert] are [/insert]- well - many accounts of their little

pleasantries. But I am going on much to fast.  X

one evening much [insert] just [/insert]before New Year Our Belgian Friend learnt

from his German that there would be a great search

next day. At 6 a.m. we would be warmed that we would

be moved to another camp & must be ready at 8 with

all our kit packed- but he added you with not be

moved. During the night officers were busy hidding

things- and some fool Frenchmen were even up before

6 a.m. when the warning came.



Transcription history
  • June 20, 2017 22:53:08 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                         31.

    nor do I to this day. [insert] Probably at the back of their minds was the idea that these might be used as bribery in an effort to escape. [/insert] They got my watch. I did not however

    give them either my flask or my ring. 6 months later when

    a new General came my watch was returned to me. My

    flask I gave to a Doctor as they had a few priv[insert] i [/insert]eledges &

    were allowed to keep these articles- & he ultimately took it

    home. My ring went through two searches.

    The first time I burried it in a piece of soap, but as there were professional

    searches busy I was not quite happy. But a better way presented

    itself. The search was long & we as usual last. So they had to

    feed us- and the orderlies had been already searched. x The

    next time it went through on my finger , and though I was

    stripped naked they never thought of looking for it there.

    Since those 2 days I have been through many searches &

    always with some contrabrand and in every case they have

    drawn blank. Later I had a suit of muffi ^[insert] a criminal offense [/insert] this was kept

    just outside the commandants office. A map I kept in a

    tin of sherbert and a pair of win cutters that I stole was

    on the roof. As far as notes are concerned it would interest

    their professionals to know that we English do not construct

    the handles of our tennis ra[insert] c [/insert]quets like them. and in the

    difference these is [insert] are [/insert]- well - many accounts of their little

    pleasantries. But I am going on much to fast.  X

    one evening much [insert] just [/insert]before New Year Our Belgian Friend learnt

    from his German that there would be a great search

    next day. At 6 a.m. we would be warmed that we would

    be moved to another camp & must be ready at 8 with

    all our kit packed- but he added you with not be

    moved. During the night officers were busy hidding

    things- and some fool Frenchmen were even up before

    6 a.m. when the warning came.


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    ID
    3963 / 243368
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



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