POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 57

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                                                                               30.

It was next sprung upon us that owing to a shortage of tobacco

in Germany the sale of tobacco this commodity in the canteen would cease.

A wild rush to the Canteen proved that this order was in

effect. In the afternoon however all the tobacco & cigars in

the place were sold under the eyes of the German N.C.O.

who for the time pretended to be blind.

A week later it was given out that from that moment no

smoking was allowed- it was now stated that the Germans

in France were not allowed to smoke. This nearly led to

a mutiny- the French calling out "liar". X

I now come to how the Germans enforced this order. If one was

brought up for smoking it meant a certain number of days in

cells. The little N.C.O. Pefifer was always on the look out to catch

people. The junior N.C.O.s did not go out of their way to look

for it. As to the sentries - one who had served with us in

South Africa stopped me one day and said they had agreed

amongst themselves that they would never see us smoking in

our rooms. All the same it was no joke. German N.C.O.s

were walking into the room at any odd minute. When I

was moved to SCHORNHORST I found that the order was absolutely

ignored in the rooms. But here the N.C.O & sentries could not

look in. Here [insert] when at Schornhorst [/insert]we were ordered to give up all out tobacco-

Mine was merely hidden- One day the Captain came round

in the evening. I was smoking a cigar. He must have seen

me. but he said nothing. This was not at the Citadel

which was much more stricter.

Between We were not told that we must give  up all watches

rings and anything of silver. And they asked us to sign a

certificate to the effect that all had been given up. Of

course we did not know what the Germans were up to.



Transcription saved

                                                                               30.

It was next sprung upon us that owing to a shortage of tobacco

in Germany the sale of tobacco this commodity in the canteen would cease.

A wild rush to the Canteen proved that this order was in

effect. In the afternoon however all the tobacco & cigars in

the place were sold under the eyes of the German N.C.O.

who for the time pretended to be blind.

A week later it was given out that from that moment no

smoking was allowed- it was now stated that the Germans

in France were not allowed to smoke. This nearly led to

a mutiny- the French calling out "liar". X

I now come to how the Germans enforced this order. If one was

brought up for smoking it meant a certain number of days in

cells. The little N.C.O. Pefifer was always on the look out to catch

people. The junior N.C.O.s did not go out of their way to look

for it. As to the sentries - one who had served with us in

South Africa stopped me one day and said they had agreed

amongst themselves that they would never see us smoking in

our rooms. All the same it was no joke. German N.C.O.s

were walking into the room at any odd minute. When I

was moved to SCHORNHORST I found that the order was absolutely

ignored in the rooms. But here the N.C.O & sentries could not

look in. Here [insert] when at Schornhorst [/insert]we were ordered to give up all out tobacco-

Mine was merely hidden- One day the Captain came round

in the evening. I was smoking a cigar. He must have seen

me. but he said nothing. This was not at the Citadel

which was much more stricter.

Between We were not told that we must give  up all watches

rings and anything of silver. And they asked us to sign a

certificate to the effect that all had been given up. Of

course we did not know what the Germans were up to.




Transcription history
  • June 20, 2017 22:32:37 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                                   30.

    It was next sprung upon us that owing to a shortage of tobacco

    in Germany the sale of tobacco this commodity in the canteen would cease.

    A wild rush to the Canteen proved that this order was in

    effect. In the afternoon however all the tobacco & cigars in

    the place were sold under the eyes of the German N.C.O.

    who for the time pretended to be blind.

    A week later it was given out that from that moment no

    smoking was allowed- it was now stated that the Germans

    in France were not allowed to smoke. This nearly led to

    a mutiny- the French calling out "liar". X

    I now come to how the Germans enforced this order. If one was

    brought up for smoking it meant a certain number of days in

    cells. The little N.C.O. Pefifer was always on the look out to catch

    people. The junior N.C.O.s did not go out of their way to look

    for it. As to the sentries - one who had served with us in

    South Africa stopped me one day and said they had agreed

    amongst themselves that they would never see us smoking in

    our rooms. All the same it was no joke. German N.C.O.s

    were walking into the room at any odd minute. When I

    was moved to SCHORNHORST I found that the order was absolutely

    ignored in the rooms. But here the N.C.O & sentries could not

    look in. Here [insert] when at Schornhorst [/insert]we were ordered to give up all out tobacco-

    Mine was merely hidden- One day the Captain came round

    in the evening. I was smoking a cigar. He must have seen

    me. but he said nothing. This was not at the Citadel

    which was much more stricter.

    Between We were not told that we must give  up all watches

    rings and anything of silver. And they asked us to sign a

    certificate to the effect that all had been given up. Of

    course we did not know what the Germans were up to.



  • June 20, 2017 22:14:43 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                                   30.

    It was next sprung upon us that owing to a shortage of tobacco

    in Germany the sale of tobacco this commodity in the canteen would cease.

    A wild rush to the Canteen proved that this order was in

    effect. In the afternoon however all the tobacco & cigars in

    the place were sold under the eyes of the German N.C.O.

    who for the time pretended to be blind.

    A week later it was given out that from that moment no

    smoking was allowed- it was now stated that the Germans

    in France were not allowed to smoke. This nearly led to

    a mutiny- the French calling out "liar". X

    I now come to how the Germans enforced this order. If one was

    brought up for smoking it meant a certain number of days in

    cells. The little N.C.O. Pefifer was always on the look out to catch

    people. The junior N.



  • June 20, 2017 20:48:11 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                                   30.

    It was next sprung upon us that owing to a shortage of tobacco

    in Germany the sale of tobacco this commodity in the canteen would cease.

    A wild rush to the Canteen proved that this order was in

    effect. In the afternoon however all the tobacco & cigars in

    the place were sold under the eyes of the German N.C.O.

    who for the time pretended to be blind.



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    ID
    3963 / 243366
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



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