POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 55

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                                                        29.

We fed  at the top of the room with him. He had a private

lamp, of here only oil lamps were in use. He also ( a very 

important point) had the Hun Sous officier in his pay.

At the beginning the days slipped along more or less uneventfully.

Before Xmas we were told on appel that his excellency the General

had been asked if the prisoners might receive luxuries such

as chocolate from home and he had decided that on no

account could this priv[insert] i [/insert]aledge be granted.This was taken as

an excuse for removing any food stuff which our parcels

might contain. The excuse for this robbery was that it would

be given the German Red Cross. One was thus frequently

asked to sign for a parcel which was opened in your presence

and the contents solemnly taken away. For some reason the

French were allowed their food stuff, owing it was said to

an agreement with the French Government.

I found that the Belgians & French celebrated Xmas on Xmas

Eve. Not that there was any celebration here. The night

however was made hideous with church Bells in the town.

Our Xmas dinner in Casemate 8 is worth recording. It did

not arrive till about 4 p.m. Then we had a kind of sago

sweet soup. After an interval came an underdone chunk

of pork- My portion was all fat. We waited a considerable

time for potatoes there being our staple diet. It turned out

however that none were forthcoming. The German in charge

of the kitchen arrangements being drunk. Followed 3 preserved

cherries on a saucer. We solemnly gave each other presents

of a value of about 2d each.

I had fortunately received in a packet a smak tin of

tobacco. I got it just in time. By making but one

pipe a day I made it last some time.





Transcription saved

                                                        29.

We fed  at the top of the room with him. He had a private

lamp, of here only oil lamps were in use. He also ( a very 

important point) had the Hun Sous officier in his pay.

At the beginning the days slipped along more or less uneventfully.

Before Xmas we were told on appel that his excellency the General

had been asked if the prisoners might receive luxuries such

as chocolate from home and he had decided that on no

account could this priv[insert] i [/insert]aledge be granted.This was taken as

an excuse for removing any food stuff which our parcels

might contain. The excuse for this robbery was that it would

be given the German Red Cross. One was thus frequently

asked to sign for a parcel which was opened in your presence

and the contents solemnly taken away. For some reason the

French were allowed their food stuff, owing it was said to

an agreement with the French Government.

I found that the Belgians & French celebrated Xmas on Xmas

Eve. Not that there was any celebration here. The night

however was made hideous with church Bells in the town.

Our Xmas dinner in Casemate 8 is worth recording. It did

not arrive till about 4 p.m. Then we had a kind of sago

sweet soup. After an interval came an underdone chunk

of pork- My portion was all fat. We waited a considerable

time for potatoes there being our staple diet. It turned out

however that none were forthcoming. The German in charge

of the kitchen arrangements being drunk. Followed 3 preserved

cherries on a saucer. We solemnly gave each other presents

of a value of about 2d each.

I had fortunately received in a packet a smak tin of

tobacco. I got it just in time. By making but one

pipe a day I made it last some time.






Transcription history
  • June 20, 2017 20:44:25 Annick Rodriguez

                                                            29.

    We fed  at the top of the room with him. He had a private

    lamp, of here only oil lamps were in use. He also ( a very 

    important point) had the Hun Sous officier in his pay.

    At the beginning the days slipped along more or less uneventfully.

    Before Xmas we were told on appel that his excellency the General

    had been asked if the prisoners might receive luxuries such

    as chocolate from home and he had decided that on no

    account could this priv[insert] i [/insert]aledge be granted.This was taken as

    an excuse for removing any food stuff which our parcels

    might contain. The excuse for this robbery was that it would

    be given the German Red Cross. One was thus frequently

    asked to sign for a parcel which was opened in your presence

    and the contents solemnly taken away. For some reason the

    French were allowed their food stuff, owing it was said to

    an agreement with the French Government.

    I found that the Belgians & French celebrated Xmas on Xmas

    Eve. Not that there was any celebration here. The night

    however was made hideous with church Bells in the town.

    Our Xmas dinner in Casemate 8 is worth recording. It did

    not arrive till about 4 p.m. Then we had a kind of sago

    sweet soup. After an interval came an underdone chunk

    of pork- My portion was all fat. We waited a considerable

    time for potatoes there being our staple diet. It turned out

    however that none were forthcoming. The German in charge

    of the kitchen arrangements being drunk. Followed 3 preserved

    cherries on a saucer. We solemnly gave each other presents

    of a value of about 2d each.

    I had fortunately received in a packet a smak tin of

    tobacco. I got it just in time. By making but one

    pipe a day I made it last some time.





  • June 20, 2017 20:42:17 Annick Rodriguez

                                                            29.

    We fed  at the top of the room with him. He had a private

    lamp, of here only oil lamps were in use. He also ( a very 

    important point) had the Hun Sous officier in his pay.

    At the beginning the days slipped along more or less uneventfully.

    Before Xmas we were told on appel that his excellency the General

    had been asked if the prisoners might receive luxuries such

    as chocolate from home and he had decided that on no

    account could this priv[insert] i [/insert]aledge be granted.This was taken as

    an excuse for removing any food stuff which our parcels

    might contain. The excuse for this robbery was that it would

    be given the German Red Cross. One was thus frequently

    asked to sign for a parcel which was opened in your presence

    and the contents solemnly taken away. For some reason the

    French were allowed their food stuff, owing it was said to

    an agreement with the French Government.

    I found that the Belgians & French celebrated Xmas on Xmas

    Eve. Not that there was any celebration here. The night

    however was made hideous with church Bells in the town.

    Our Xmas dinner in Casemate 8 is worth recording. It did

    not arrive till about 4 p.m. Then we had a kind of sago

    sweet soup. After an interval came an underdone chunk

    of pork- My portion was all fat. We waited a considerable

    time for potatoes there being our staple diet. It turned out





  • June 20, 2017 20:39:05 Annick Rodriguez

                                                            29.

    We fed  at the top of the room with him. He had a private

    lamp, of here only oil lamps were in use. He also ( a very 

    important point) had the Hun Sous officier in his pay.

    At the beginning the days slipped along more or less uneventfully.

    Before Xmas we were told on appel that his excellency the General

    had been asked if the prisoners might receive luxuries such

    as chocolate from home and he had decided that on no

    account could this priv[insert] i [/insert]aledge be granted.This was taken as

    an excuse for removing any food stuff which our parcels

    might contain. The excuse for this robbery was that it would

    be given the German Red Cross. One was thus frequently

    asked to sign for a parcel which was opened in your presence

    and the contents solemnly taken away. For some reason the




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    ID
    3963 / 243364
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



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