POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 54

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                                                            28.

The Casemate consisted of a [insert indicated by arrow] fairly [/insert] long room (lofty) .It

was very old & dirty , It went  going right through the

parapet. A bar[insert] r [/insert] ed window looked out to the front

this was glazed & verboden to be opened. The window

& door at the rear looked on the ammunition building

opposite perhaps 18 yards away & naturally gave little

light.

The boards had in some places great holes. It was I found

the habit of one of the French officers to wash his hands

and chuck the dirty water down the hole. ^[insert] in the floor [/insert] As chef de

chambre I objected to this on sanitary grounds. This

was perhaps better than another officer who appeared to

have taken a vow never to wash till the war was 

finished.

The night was the most objectionable . We opened the window

during the half hour we were allowed out. Then everything

was hermetically closed. The smell in the room next

morning defies description. But in this breakfast was

served. I must confess that I often could not eat it.

At 10 the room was ventilated & cleaned out by the

orderly.

We had appel when it pleased the Germans to blow a whistle

sometimes twice a day sometimes every two days. We soon

got to know that an appel as a rule meant something

unpleasant.

Here we had our first introduction to swinegeld. That is

to say follows representing money. They were as a rule

little tin circles  which could have been easily forged.

The Belgian in the room was a gentleman who had ridden at

Olympia.  spoke good English , & was a good sort.




Transcription saved

                                                            28.

The Casemate consisted of a [insert indicated by arrow] fairly [/insert] long room (lofty) .It

was very old & dirty , It went  going right through the

parapet. A bar[insert] r [/insert] ed window looked out to the front

this was glazed & verboden to be opened. The window

& door at the rear looked on the ammunition building

opposite perhaps 18 yards away & naturally gave little

light.

The boards had in some places great holes. It was I found

the habit of one of the French officers to wash his hands

and chuck the dirty water down the hole. ^[insert] in the floor [/insert] As chef de

chambre I objected to this on sanitary grounds. This

was perhaps better than another officer who appeared to

have taken a vow never to wash till the war was 

finished.

The night was the most objectionable . We opened the window

during the half hour we were allowed out. Then everything

was hermetically closed. The smell in the room next

morning defies description. But in this breakfast was

served. I must confess that I often could not eat it.

At 10 the room was ventilated & cleaned out by the

orderly.

We had appel when it pleased the Germans to blow a whistle

sometimes twice a day sometimes every two days. We soon

got to know that an appel as a rule meant something

unpleasant.

Here we had our first introduction to swinegeld. That is

to say follows representing money. They were as a rule

little tin circles  which could have been easily forged.

The Belgian in the room was a gentleman who had ridden at

Olympia.  spoke good English , & was a good sort.





Transcription history
  • June 20, 2017 20:33:28 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                28.

    The Casemate consisted of a [insert indicated by arrow] fairly [/insert] long room (lofty) .It

    was very old & dirty , It went  going right through the

    parapet. A bar[insert] r [/insert] ed window looked out to the front

    this was glazed & verboden to be opened. The window

    & door at the rear looked on the ammunition building

    opposite perhaps 18 yards away & naturally gave little

    light.

    The boards had in some places great holes. It was I found

    the habit of one of the French officers to wash his hands

    and chuck the dirty water down the hole. ^[insert] in the floor [/insert] As chef de

    chambre I objected to this on sanitary grounds. This

    was perhaps better than another officer who appeared to

    have taken a vow never to wash till the war was 

    finished.

    The night was the most objectionable . We opened the window

    during the half hour we were allowed out. Then everything

    was hermetically closed. The smell in the room next

    morning defies description. But in this breakfast was

    served. I must confess that I often could not eat it.

    At 10 the room was ventilated & cleaned out by the

    orderly.

    We had appel when it pleased the Germans to blow a whistle

    sometimes twice a day sometimes every two days. We soon

    got to know that an appel as a rule meant something

    unpleasant.

    Here we had our first introduction to swinegeld. That is

    to say follows representing money. They were as a rule

    little tin circles  which could have been easily forged.

    The Belgian in the room was a gentleman who had ridden at

    Olympia.  spoke good English , & was a good sort.




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    ID
    3963 / 243363
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



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