POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 35

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                                                                              12

in the dark. I dont remember much about the journey. We

tried to play bridge on an improvised table but the train

swayed so much that this was out of the question.

                      TORGAU

We had a considerable delay at the station. We were there

marched with a strong escourt to the lager which was in

an old fort on the other side of the ELBE. The march

was a long one and as all our lame officers had to walk

it was also a slow one. It was a rainy nasty night so

not many of the inhabitants were on view. Those who

were, reviled us in the manner which by now had become

quite familiar.

On arrival we were met by an English Staff officer & then various

particulars were taken down by the official interpreter. He,

in civil life, was a professor (of languages I think), at Belfast

University . In his short military life he was a corporal in

the R.E. The Germans then took us in hand,  they issued out

to us with  a basin, a towel, & blankets a pillow, and the

Article which they put the blankets in, and a mattress.

We were then marched over to our sleeping quarters. Here

back to the main building w^[insert] h [/insert] ere a supper was issued to

us in the canteen.

This place is run on quite other principles. Firstly the inside of the

redoubt covers a large space it takes a good ten minutes to

walk round it. There are a nice quantity of trees inside.

One must not climb to the top of the rampart under the

penalty of being shot. Again I was one day ordered off the

gymnastic ladder which stands in the big yard. We have

an apel each morning which is run by the British.

Transcription saved

                                                                              12

in the dark. I dont remember much about the journey. We

tried to play bridge on an improvised table but the train

swayed so much that this was out of the question.

                      TORGAU

We had a considerable delay at the station. We were there

marched with a strong escourt to the lager which was in

an old fort on the other side of the ELBE. The march

was a long one and as all our lame officers had to walk

it was also a slow one. It was a rainy nasty night so

not many of the inhabitants were on view. Those who

were, reviled us in the manner which by now had become

quite familiar.

On arrival we were met by an English Staff officer & then various

particulars were taken down by the official interpreter. He,

in civil life, was a professor (of languages I think), at Belfast

University . In his short military life he was a corporal in

the R.E. The Germans then took us in hand,  they issued out

to us with  a basin, a towel, & blankets a pillow, and the

Article which they put the blankets in, and a mattress.

We were then marched over to our sleeping quarters. Here

back to the main building w^[insert] h [/insert] ere a supper was issued to

us in the canteen.

This place is run on quite other principles. Firstly the inside of the

redoubt covers a large space it takes a good ten minutes to

walk round it. There are a nice quantity of trees inside.

One must not climb to the top of the rampart under the

penalty of being shot. Again I was one day ordered off the

gymnastic ladder which stands in the big yard. We have

an apel each morning which is run by the British.


Transcription history
  • June 18, 2017 16:06:43 L G

                                                                                  12

    in the dark. I dont remember much about the journey. We

    tried to play bridge on an improvised table but the train

    swayed so much that this was out of the question.

                          TORGAU

    We had a considerable delay at the station. We were there

    marched with a strong escourt to the lager which was in

    an old fort on the other side of the ELBE. The march

    was a long one and as all our lame officers had to walk

    it was also a slow one. It was a rainy nasty night so

    not many of the inhabitants were on view. Those who

    were, reviled us in the manner which by now had become

    quite familiar.

    On arrival we were met by an English Staff officer & then various

    particulars were taken down by the official interpreter. He,

    in civil life, was a professor (of languages I think), at Belfast

    University . In his short military life he was a corporal in

    the R.E. The Germans then took us in hand,  they issued out

    to us with  a basin, a towel, & blankets a pillow, and the

    Article which they put the blankets in, and a mattress.

    We were then marched over to our sleeping quarters. Here

    back to the main building w^[insert] h [/insert] ere a supper was issued to

    us in the canteen.

    This place is run on quite other principles. Firstly the inside of the

    redoubt covers a large space it takes a good ten minutes to

    walk round it. There are a nice quantity of trees inside.

    One must not climb to the top of the rampart under the

    penalty of being shot. Again I was one day ordered off the

    gymnastic ladder which stands in the big yard. We have

    an apel each morning which is run by the British.


  • June 17, 2017 21:20:34 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                                  12

    in the dark. I dont remember much about the journey. We

    tried to play bridge on an improvised table out the train

    swayed so much that this was out of the question.

                          TORGAU

    We has a considerable  ...  at the station. We were there

    marched with a strong escourt to the lager which was in

    an old fort on the other side of the ELBE. The march

    was a long one and as all out lame officers had to walk

    it as also a slow one. It was a rainy nasty night so

    no many of the inhabitants were on view. Those who

    were, reviled us in the manner which by now had become

    quite familiar.

    On arrival we were met by an English Staff officer  & then various

    particulars were taken down by the official interpreter. He,

    in civil life, was a professor (of languages I think), at Belfast

    University . In his short military life he was a corporal in

    the R.E. The Germans then took us in hand,  they  ... 

    us with  a basin, a towel, & blankets a pillow, and the

    Article which they put the blankets in, and a matress.

    We were then marched over to our sleeping quarters. Here

    back to the main building w^[insert] h [/insert] ere a supper was issued to

    us in the canteen.

    This place is run on quite other principles. Firstly the inside of the

    redoubt covers a large space it takes a good ten minutes to

    walk round it. There are a nice quantity of trees inside.

    One must not climb to the top of the rampart under the

    penalty of being shot. Again I was one day ordered off the

    gymnastic ladder which stands in the big yard. We have

    an apel cash morning which is run by the British.


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    ID
    3963 / 243344
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



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