POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 34

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                                                                                                  10.                     

                                           Halle

for the English. Here I was senior British officer. It was

not long before a row took place. The Russian in the bed

X next mine was rather an ag[insert] g [/insert] ressive fellow. X He This Russian used to move

when he slept . Most of the night however he chewed sweets

and spat on the floor. As my bed was at the outside

3" from his I did not appreciate this. My scot[insert] c [/insert] h neighbour

kept a stick, for which he appeared to have two main uses.

one to prod the Russian when he made the night melod-

-ious and the other to keep the window near his bed

open. It was over the air question that trouble arose.

We were herded in a long room & we demanded  a certain

amount of ventilation. We wanted one window, in perhaps

twenty open. The Russians opposed this , & were backed up

by their Doctor who said they would all get chills.

We opened it, they shut it. As we were by the window

we carried the situation prof. tem. They then appealed

to the Germans. The Germans had me up & stated that

we had to agree. If there was any more trouble about

it, we English would all be transferred to the barn.

This was a Draughty building with a stone floor where

at present the sailors were located. Temporally arily the Russians

scored a victory, practically the window was again opened

when the Germans had left!

We had little to do to fill in the day. The retired army officer

had some cards & we used to occasionally play bridge.

We walked for a certain amount of time. This walking

round a cage 200 by 10 yards requires some moral force

for it is a most monotonous proceeding . Most of us

however did it for a certain number of hours but it was

a penance, not a pleasure.

We were allowed to write a Post Card or letter home, but it was

very problematical if they were ever sent.

Transcription saved

                                                                                                  10.                     

                                           Halle

for the English. Here I was senior British officer. It was

not long before a row took place. The Russian in the bed

X next mine was rather an ag[insert] g [/insert] ressive fellow. X He This Russian used to move

when he slept . Most of the night however he chewed sweets

and spat on the floor. As my bed was at the outside

3" from his I did not appreciate this. My scot[insert] c [/insert] h neighbour

kept a stick, for which he appeared to have two main uses.

one to prod the Russian when he made the night melod-

-ious and the other to keep the window near his bed

open. It was over the air question that trouble arose.

We were herded in a long room & we demanded  a certain

amount of ventilation. We wanted one window, in perhaps

twenty open. The Russians opposed this , & were backed up

by their Doctor who said they would all get chills.

We opened it, they shut it. As we were by the window

we carried the situation prof. tem. They then appealed

to the Germans. The Germans had me up & stated that

we had to agree. If there was any more trouble about

it, we English would all be transferred to the barn.

This was a Draughty building with a stone floor where

at present the sailors were located. Temporally arily the Russians

scored a victory, practically the window was again opened

when the Germans had left!

We had little to do to fill in the day. The retired army officer

had some cards & we used to occasionally play bridge.

We walked for a certain amount of time. This walking

round a cage 200 by 10 yards requires some moral force

for it is a most monotonous proceeding . Most of us

however did it for a certain number of hours but it was

a penance, not a pleasure.

We were allowed to write a Post Card or letter home, but it was

very problematical if they were ever sent.


Transcription history
  • June 17, 2017 21:07:22 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                                                      10.                     

                                               Halle

    for the English. Here I was senior British officer. It was

    not long before a row took place. The Russian in the bed

    X next mine was rather an ag[insert] g [/insert] ressive fellow. X He This Russian used to move

    when he slept . Most of the night however he chewed sweets

    and spat on the floor. As my bed was at the outside

    3" from his I did not appreciate this. My scot[insert] c [/insert] h neighbour

    kept a stick, for which he appeared to have two main uses.

    one to prod the Russian when he made the night melod-

    -ious and the other to keep the window near his bed

    open. It was over the air question that trouble arose.

    We were herded in a long room & we demanded  a certain

    amount of ventilation. We wanted one window, in perhaps

    twenty open. The Russians opposed this , & were backed up

    by their Doctor who said they would all get chills.

    We opened it, they shut it. As we were by the window

    we carried the situation prof. tem. They then appealed

    to the Germans. The Germans had me up & stated that

    we had to agree. If there was any more trouble about

    it, we English would all be transferred to the barn.

    This was a Draughty building with a stone floor where

    at present the sailors were located. Temporally arily the Russians

    scored a victory, practically the window was again opened

    when the Germans had left!

    We had little to do to fill in the day. The retired army officer

    had some cards & we used to occasionally play bridge.

    We walked for a certain amount of time. This walking

    round a cage 200 by 10 yards requires some moral force

    for it is a most monotonous proceeding . Most of us

    however did it for a certain number of hours but it was

    a penance, not a pleasure.

    We were allowed to write a Post Card or letter home, but it was

    very problematical if they were ever sent.


  • June 17, 2017 18:57:01 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                                                      10.                     

                                               Halle

    for the English. Here I was senior British officer. It was

    not long before a row took place. The Russian in the bed

    X next mine was rather an ag[insert] g [/insert] ressive fellow. X He This Russian used to move

    when he slept . Most of the night however he chewed sweets

    and spat on the floor. As my bed was at the outside

    3" from his I did not appreciate this. My scot[insert] c [/insert] h neighbour

    kept a stick, for which he appeared to have two main uses.

    one to prod the Russian when he made the night melod-

    -ious and the other to keep the window near his bed

    open. It was over the air question that trouble arose.

    We were herded in a long room &


  • June 17, 2017 18:55:48 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                                                      10.                     

                                               Halle

    for the English. Here I was senior British officer. It was

    not long before a row took place. The Russian in the bed

    X next mine was rather an ag[insert] g [/insert] ressive fellow. X He This Russian used to move

    when he slept . Most of the night however he chewed sweets

    and spat on the floor. As my bed was at the outside

    3" from his I did not appreciate this. My scot[insert] c [/insert] h neighbour

    kept a stick, for which he appeared to have two main uses.


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    ID
    3963 / 243343
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



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