POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 33

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                                               9.

of one's food was almost a free fight, with the result that a

certain amount was never paid for. Above the canteen, ran

balconies which were utilised for further sleeping accom [insert] mo [/insert] dation.

The German supervision seemed somewhat lax. We nevr had

appel or roll call.  The German officer used however to come

round at night when we were in bed. The German sentries

were very unpleasant and obnoxious going out of their way

to be rude. At the Canteen one could purchase beside what

I have mentioned, jam, eggs (of the curated variety) , tobacco,

cigars, sweets, chocolate and articles of necessity such as hair

brushes, clothes brushes, soap and saf[insert] e [/insert] ty razors. (the other kind

were not allowed)

Personally I was captured with very little money on me 2

every penny to be spent had to be carefully thought out.

I could not shave for I could not afford a razor. I bought

however a clothes brush, but and it was several days before

I got the mud off my uniform.

My compatriots were of a very mixed character. There were several

merchant officers who had been caught in German Ports on the

Declaration of War. Most had ^[insert] tried but had [/insert] not been allowed to leave, before

war was declared. There were  two  Cambridge undergraduates

A Volunteer officer, who was in the country. A Naval officer

who was attached to the Turkish Navy and was going

home on leave. A retired army officer and about 17  serving 

Officers. including a doctor. One British private soldier.

A  fair number of Russians with several priests.

I only spent 8 or 9 days before going to another camp. All

camps as will  be  seen  varried enormously in every way.

A German Padre came in on Sundays + held a  service 

Transcription saved

                                               9.

of one's food was almost a free fight, with the result that a

certain amount was never paid for. Above the canteen, ran

balconies which were utilised for further sleeping accom [insert] mo [/insert] dation.

The German supervision seemed somewhat lax. We nevr had

appel or roll call.  The German officer used however to come

round at night when we were in bed. The German sentries

were very unpleasant and obnoxious going out of their way

to be rude. At the Canteen one could purchase beside what

I have mentioned, jam, eggs (of the curated variety) , tobacco,

cigars, sweets, chocolate and articles of necessity such as hair

brushes, clothes brushes, soap and saf[insert] e [/insert] ty razors. (the other kind

were not allowed)

Personally I was captured with very little money on me 2

every penny to be spent had to be carefully thought out.

I could not shave for I could not afford a razor. I bought

however a clothes brush, but and it was several days before

I got the mud off my uniform.

My compatriots were of a very mixed character. There were several

merchant officers who had been caught in German Ports on the

Declaration of War. Most had ^[insert] tried but had [/insert] not been allowed to leave, before

war was declared. There were  two  Cambridge undergraduates

A Volunteer officer, who was in the country. A Naval officer

who was attached to the Turkish Navy and was going

home on leave. A retired army officer and about 17  serving 

Officers. including a doctor. One British private soldier.

A  fair number of Russians with several priests.

I only spent 8 or 9 days before going to another camp. All

camps as will  be  seen  varried enormously in every way.

A German Padre came in on Sundays + held a  service 


Transcription history
  • June 19, 2017 14:46:05 L G

                                                   9.

    of one's food was almost a free fight, with the result that a

    certain amount was never paid for. Above the canteen, ran

    balconies which were utilised for further sleeping accom [insert] mo [/insert] dation.

    The German supervision seemed somewhat lax. We nevr had

    appel or roll call.  The German officer used however to come

    round at night when we were in bed. The German sentries

    were very unpleasant and obnoxious going out of their way

    to be rude. At the Canteen one could purchase beside what

    I have mentioned, jam, eggs (of the curated variety) , tobacco,

    cigars, sweets, chocolate and articles of necessity such as hair

    brushes, clothes brushes, soap and saf[insert] e [/insert] ty razors. (the other kind

    were not allowed)

    Personally I was captured with very little money on me 2

    every penny to be spent had to be carefully thought out.

    I could not shave for I could not afford a razor. I bought

    however a clothes brush, but and it was several days before

    I got the mud off my uniform.

    My compatriots were of a very mixed character. There were several

    merchant officers who had been caught in German Ports on the

    Declaration of War. Most had ^[insert] tried but had [/insert] not been allowed to leave, before

    war was declared. There were  two  Cambridge undergraduates

    A Volunteer officer, who was in the country. A Naval officer

    who was attached to the Turkish Navy and was going

    home on leave. A retired army officer and about 17  serving 

    Officers. including a doctor. One British private soldier.

    A  fair number of Russians with several priests.

    I only spent 8 or 9 days before going to another camp. All

    camps as will  be  seen  varried enormously in every way.

    A German Padre came in on Sundays + held a  service 


  • June 17, 2017 18:50:48 Annick Rodriguez

                                                   9.

    of one's food was almost a free fight, with the result that a

    certain amount was never paid for. Above the canteen, ran

    balconies which were utilised for further sleeping accom [insert] mo [/insert] dation.

    The German supervision viewed somewhat lax. We nevr had

    appel or roll call.  The German officer used however to come

    round at night when we were in bed. The German sentries

    were very unpleasant and obnoxious going out of their way

    to be rude. At the Canteen one could purchase beside what

    I have mentioned, jam, eggs (of the curated variety) , tobacco,

    cigars, sweets, chocolate and article of necessity such as hair

    brushes, clothes brushes, soap and saf[insert] e [/insert] ty razors. (the other kind

    were not allowed)

    Personally I was captured with very little money on me 2

    every penny to be spent had to be carefully thought out.

    I could not shave for I could not afford a razor. I bought

    however a clothes brush, but and it was several days before

    I got the mud off my uniform.

    My compatriots were of a very mixed character. There were several

    merchant officers who had been caught in German Ports  on the

    Declaration of War. Most had ^[insert] tried but had [/insert] not been allowed to leave, before

    war was declared. There were  ...  Cambridge undergraduates

    A Volunteer officer, who was in the country. A Naval officer

    who was attached to the Turkish Navy and was going

    home on leave. A retired army officer and about 17  ... 

    Officers. including a doctor. One British private soldier.

    A  fair number of Russians with several priests.

    I only spent 8 or 9 days before going to another camp. All

    camps as will  ...  ...  varried enormously in every way.

    A German Padre came in on Sundays + held a  ... 


  • June 17, 2017 18:41:29 Annick Rodriguez

                                                   9.

    of one's food was almost a free fight, with the result that a

    certain amount was never paid for. Above the canteen, ran

    balconies which were utilised for further sleeping accom [insert] mo [/insert] dation.

    The German supervision viewed somewhat lax. We nevr had

    appel or roll call.  The German officer used however to come

    round at night when we were in bed. The German sentries

    were very unpleasant and obnoxious going out of their way

    to be rude. At the Canteen one could purchase beside what

    I have mentioned, jam, eggs (of the curated variety) , tobacco,

    cigars, sweets, chocolate and article of necessity such as hair

    brushes, clothes brushes, soap and saf[insert] e [/insert] ty razors. (the other kind

    were not allowed)

    Personally


  • June 17, 2017 18:26:14 Annick Rodriguez

                                                   9.

    of one's food was almost a free fight, with the result that a

    certain amount was never paid for. Above the canteen, ran

    balconies which were untilised for further


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    ID
    3963 / 243342
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



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