POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 21

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8.  In the upper right corner 

The court yard was overlooked by a row of good sized houses, where

sunday afternoon amusement was, parties to look at the prisoners.

The sketch opposite explains the positions of the various buildings.

The part on which one was allowed to exercise was either very

rough earth or pavement, the whole being permeated with

coal dust. At any rate if it blew, which it generally

did, everything was covered with black.

The sanitary arrangements were vile, no less word expresses

that situation.

The sleeping house where I was placed consisted of a series of

large long rooms one above the other. Some tables, & form forms

occupied the centre of the room. We slept on both sides of those. We

were provided with a straw mattress and the two blankets we

had drawn. Each mattress was practically touching its next

door neighbour's. No smoking allowed here!

The Hospital consisted of a small room with practically no stores

and was run by an English officer of the R. A. M. Corps.

The Barn was a large draughty building. which was used as a

sleeping room.

I now come to the canteen. The floor was made of log piles which

were never cleaned, the intervening spaces being full of skins

of bacon, matches and other refuse. The furniture consisted of

little tables and garden chairs. There was a canteen from which

one could purchase various articles. One had to buy all one's

meals here. At dinner, 1 p.m. a hot meal of kinds, could be

procured for 50 pp. In the morning coffee was on sale & in

the evening cocoa & soup. Brodchen brotchen, a small bread could be obtained. One

had to cater for one self according to the length of one's

purse or ones proficiency at sleight of hand.

Half an hour before meals a big queue formed and the obtaining

Transcription saved

8.  In the upper right corner 

The court yard was overlooked by a row of good sized houses, where

sunday afternoon amusement was, parties to look at the prisoners.

The sketch opposite explains the positions of the various buildings.

The part on which one was allowed to exercise was either very

rough earth or pavement, the whole being permeated with

coal dust. At any rate if it blew, which it generally

did, everything was covered with black.

The sanitary arrangements were vile, no less word expresses

that situation.

The sleeping house where I was placed consisted of a series of

large long rooms one above the other. Some tables, & form forms

occupied the centre of the room. We slept on both sides of those. We

were provided with a straw mattress and the two blankets we

had drawn. Each mattress was practically touching its next

door neighbour's. No smoking allowed here!

The Hospital consisted of a small room with practically no stores

and was run by an English officer of the R. A. M. Corps.

The Barn was a large draughty building. which was used as a

sleeping room.

I now come to the canteen. The floor was made of log piles which

were never cleaned, the intervening spaces being full of skins

of bacon, matches and other refuse. The furniture consisted of

little tables and garden chairs. There was a canteen from which

one could purchase various articles. One had to buy all one's

meals here. At dinner, 1 p.m. a hot meal of kinds, could be

procured for 50 pp. In the morning coffee was on sale & in

the evening cocoa & soup. Brodchen brotchen, a small bread could be obtained. One

had to cater for one self according to the length of one's

purse or ones proficiency at sleight of hand.

Half an hour before meals a big queue formed and the obtaining


Transcription history
  • June 17, 2017 16:01:57 L G

    8.  In the upper right corner 

    The court yard was overlooked by a row of good sized houses, where

    sunday afternoon amusement was, parties to look at the prisoners.

    The sketch opposite explains the positions of the various buildings.

    The part on which one was allowed to exercise was either very

    rough earth or pavement, the whole being permeated with

    coal dust. At any rate if it blew, which it generally

    did, everything was covered with black.

    The sanitary arrangements were vile, no less word expresses

    that situation.

    The sleeping house where I was placed consisted of a series of

    large long rooms one above the other. Some tables, & form forms

    occupied the centre of the room. We slept on both sides of those. We

    were provided with a straw mattress and the two blankets we

    had drawn. Each mattress was practically touching its next

    door neighbour's. No smoking allowed here!

    The Hospital consisted of a small room with practically no stores

    and was run by an English officer of the R. A. M. Corps.

    The Barn was a large draughty building. which was used as a

    sleeping room.

    I now come to the canteen. The floor was made of log piles which

    were never cleaned, the intervening spaces being full of skins

    of bacon, matches and other refuse. The furniture consisted of

    little tables and garden chairs. There was a canteen from which

    one could purchase various articles. One had to buy all one's

    meals here. At dinner, 1 p.m. a hot meal of kinds, could be

    procured for 50 pp. In the morning coffee was on sale & in

    the evening cocoa & soup. Brodchen brotchen, a small bread could be obtained. One

    had to cater for one self according to the length of one's

    purse or ones proficiency at sleight of hand.

    Half an hour before meals a big queue formed and the obtaining


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    ID
    3963 / 243330
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



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