POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 19

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7.

we had been quartered at Cambridge now we were to be

imprisoned in a german university town!

Halle. 

I have now to describe one of the worst camps it was my fortune

to be in, and at perhaps its worst period. The camp was in

some factory building. You came in through a gate. In front

of you, was a wire fence, inside of which , prisoners were walking

up and down. Our walk from the station had been more or

less uneventful except for a crowd of small boys and children 

with their usual remark "swinehund."  Schweinhund, offensive term "pig-dog" the march had been

quite a short one, but we had been kept an hour or two at

the station before undertaking it. On arrival we were first ushered

into a kind of guard room, outside the fence- where we

An "x" above and between the words "searched" and "asked" in the line below, indicates the insertion of the phrase "but only in a perfunctory manner," from the previous page 

were searched asked questions and finally given two blankets

and a towel. The officer told us we ought to have been sent

to Torgau not here. As if this had been our fault. We were

then bundled inside the wire fence and left to our devices.

There were a few English there who at once told us the limitations

of the camp. I staked out a claim for a sleeping place

with an officer of the Gordons on one side and a Russian on

the other. But of this room more anon.

The first thing to do was get a wash. For all the thousand odd

officers in the place, there was one small wash house, with about

20 basins and a few taps of cold water. The floor from constant

use stood an inch deep in water. I had now at last an

opportunity of washing my foot which had been on the ground

all these days. It was much swollen, It was however more or less

of a fight to get into the wash place at all. I should sat there

were in camp over 1, 000 Russians, 5 or 600 French, and a mixed bag

of English.

Transcription saved

7.

we had been quartered at Cambridge now we were to be

imprisoned in a german university town!

Halle. 

I have now to describe one of the worst camps it was my fortune

to be in, and at perhaps its worst period. The camp was in

some factory building. You came in through a gate. In front

of you, was a wire fence, inside of which , prisoners were walking

up and down. Our walk from the station had been more or

less uneventful except for a crowd of small boys and children 

with their usual remark "swinehund."  Schweinhund, offensive term "pig-dog" the march had been

quite a short one, but we had been kept an hour or two at

the station before undertaking it. On arrival we were first ushered

into a kind of guard room, outside the fence- where we

An "x" above and between the words "searched" and "asked" in the line below, indicates the insertion of the phrase "but only in a perfunctory manner," from the previous page 

were searched asked questions and finally given two blankets

and a towel. The officer told us we ought to have been sent

to Torgau not here. As if this had been our fault. We were

then bundled inside the wire fence and left to our devices.

There were a few English there who at once told us the limitations

of the camp. I staked out a claim for a sleeping place

with an officer of the Gordons on one side and a Russian on

the other. But of this room more anon.

The first thing to do was get a wash. For all the thousand odd

officers in the place, there was one small wash house, with about

20 basins and a few taps of cold water. The floor from constant

use stood an inch deep in water. I had now at last an

opportunity of washing my foot which had been on the ground

all these days. It was much swollen, It was however more or less

of a fight to get into the wash place at all. I should sat there

were in camp over 1, 000 Russians, 5 or 600 French, and a mixed bag

of English.


Transcription history
  • November 22, 2017 15:51:17 Lisa Phongsavath (F&F)

    7.

    we had been quartered at Cambridge now we were to be

    imprisoned in a german university town!

    Halle. 

    I have now to describe one of the worst camps it was my fortune

    to be in, and at perhaps its worst period. The camp was in

    some factory building. You came in through a gate. In front

    of you, was a wire fence, inside of which , prisoners were walking

    up and down. Our walk from the station had been more or

    less uneventful except for a crowd of small boys and children 

    with their usual remark "swinehund."  Schweinhund, offensive term "pig-dog" the march had been

    quite a short one, but we had been kept an hour or two at

    the station before undertaking it. On arrival we were first ushered

    into a kind of guard room, outside the fence- where we

    An "x" above and between the words "searched" and "asked" in the line below, indicates the insertion of the phrase "but only in a perfunctory manner," from the previous page 

    were searched asked questions and finally given two blankets

    and a towel. The officer told us we ought to have been sent

    to Torgau not here. As if this had been our fault. We were

    then bundled inside the wire fence and left to our devices.

    There were a few English there who at once told us the limitations

    of the camp. I staked out a claim for a sleeping place

    with an officer of the Gordons on one side and a Russian on

    the other. But of this room more anon.

    The first thing to do was get a wash. For all the thousand odd

    officers in the place, there was one small wash house, with about

    20 basins and a few taps of cold water. The floor from constant

    use stood an inch deep in water. I had now at last an

    opportunity of washing my foot which had been on the ground

    all these days. It was much swollen, It was however more or less

    of a fight to get into the wash place at all. I should sat there

    were in camp over 1, 000 Russians, 5 or 600 French, and a mixed bag

    of English.


  • June 19, 2017 14:22:40 L G

    7.  In the upper right corner. 

    we had been quatered at Cambridge now we were to be

    imprisoned in a german university town!

    Halle. 

    I have now to describe one of the worst camps it was my  fortune 

    to be in, and at perhaps its worst period. The camp was in

    some factory building. You came in through a gate. In front

    of you, was a wire fence, inside of which , prisoners were walking

    up and down. Our walk from the station had been more or

    less uneventful except for a crowd of small boys and children 

    with their usual remark "swinehund."  Schweinhund, offensive term "pig-dog" the march had been

    quite a short one, but we had been kept an hour or two at

    the station before undertaking it. On arrival we were first ushered

    into a kind of guard room, outside the fence- where we

    An "x" above and between the words "searched" and "asked" in the line below, indicates the insertion of the phrase "but only in a perfunctory manner," from the previous page 

    were searched asked questions and finally given two blankets

    and a towel. The officer told us we ought to have been sent

    to Torgau not here. As if this had been our fault. We were

    then bundled inside the wire fence and left to our devices.

    There were a few English there who at once told us the limitations

    of the camp. I staked out a claim for a sleeping place

    with an officer of the Gordons on one side and a Russian on

    the other. But of this room more anon.

    The first thing to do was get a wash. For all the thousand odd

    officers in the place, there was one small wash house, with about

    20 basins and a few taps of cold water. The floor from constant

    use stood an inch deep in water. I had now at last an

    opportunity of washing my foot which had been on the ground

    all these days. It was much swollen, It was however more or less

    of a fight to get into the wash place at all. I should sat there

    were in camp over 1, 000 Russians, 5 or 600 French, and a mixed bag

    of English.


  • June 17, 2017 16:24:33 L G

    7.  In the upper right corner. 

    we had been quatered at Cambridge now we were to be

    imprisoned in a german university town!

    Halle. 

    I have now to describe one of the worst camps it was my  fortune 

    to be in, and at perhaps its worst period. The camp was in

    some factory building. You came in through a gate. In front

    of you, was a wire fence, inside of which , prisoners were walking

    up and down. Our walk from the station had been more or

    less uneventful except for a crowd of small boys and children 

    with their usual remark "swinehund."  Schweinhund Offensive term "pig-dog" the march had been

    quite a short one, but we had been kept an hour or two at

    the station before undertaking it. On arrival we were first ushered

    into a kind of guard room, outside the fence- where we

    An "x" above and between the words "searched" and "asked" in the line below, indicates the insertion of the phrase "but only in a perfunctory manner," from the previous page 

    were searched asked questions and finally given two blankets

    and a towel. The officer told us we ought to have been sent

    to Torgau not here. As if this had been our fault. We were

    then bundled inside the wire fence and left to our devices.

    There were a few English there who at once told us the limitations

    of the camp. I staked out a claim for a sleeping place

    with an officer of the Gordons on one side and a Russian on

    the other. But of this room more anon.

    The first thing to do was get a wash. For all the thousand odd

    officers in the place, there was one small wash house, with about

    20 basins and a few taps of cold water. The floor from constant

    use stood an inch deep in water. I had now at last an

    opportunity of washing my foot which had been on the ground

    all these days. It was much swollen, It was however more or less

    of a fight to get into the wash place at all. I should sat there

    were in camp over 1, 000 Russians, 5 or 600 French, and a mixed bag

    of English.


  • June 17, 2017 12:18:14 L G

    7.  In the upper right corner. 

    we had been quatered at Cambridge now we were to be

    imprisoned in a german university town!

    Halle. 

    I have now to describe one of the worst camps it was my  fortune 

    to be in, and at perhaps its worst period. The camp was in

    some factory building. You came in through a gate. In front

    of you, was a wire fence, inside of which , prisoners were walking

    up and down. Our walk from the station had been more or

    less uneventful except for a crowd of small boys and children 

    with their usual remark "swinehund."  Schweinhund Offensive term "pig-dog" the march had been

    quite a short one, but we had been kept an hour or two at

    the station before undertaking it. On arrival we were first ushered

    into a kind of guard room, outside the fence- where we

    An "x" above and between the words "searched" and "asked" in the line below, indicates the insertion of the phrase "but only in a perfunctory manner," from the previous page 

    were searched asked questions and finally given two blankets

    and a towel. The officer told us we ought to have been sent

    to Torgau not here. As if this had been our fault. We were

    then bundled inside the wire fence and left to our devices.

    There were a few English there who at once told us the limitations

    of the camp. I staked out a claim for a sleeping place

    with an officer of the  ...  on one side and a Russian on

    the other. But of this room more anon.

    The first thing to do was get a wash. For all the thousand odd

    officers in the place, there was one small wash house, with about

    20 basins and a few taps of cold water. The floor from constant

    use stood an inch deep in water. I had now at last an

    opportunity of washing my foot which had been on the ground

    all these days. It was much swollen, It was however more or less

    of a fight to get into the wash place at all. I should sat there

    were in camp over 1, 000 Russians, 5 or 600 French, and a mixed bag

    of English.


Description

Save description
  • 51.4969802||11.9688029||

    Halle (Saale), Germany

  • 51.557934||12.991583||

    Torgau, Germany

Location(s)
  • Document location Halle (Saale), Germany
  • Additional document location Torgau, Germany
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ID
3963 / 243328
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
Toby Backhouse
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


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