POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 12

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 Page  4

that I had had for several days. But we soon saw that we,

and the French, were on quite different footings. Thus whilst

the French were merely asked if they had any weapons, we

were minutely searched. They also wanted us to give our

parole not to escape; of course we did nothing of the 

kind. It was further intimated that if one of us escaped,

the others would be shot. This may have been bluff,

or it may not. In any case, they were taking no

chances. All the officers' escort was concentrated in

our part of the compartment, the French being more or

less unguarded. We did not progress very far by rail. 

When we were derailed, it appeared that the

French in their retreat had blown up a big viaduct,

and numerous bridges; that the real rail head

was some 26 kilometres away. The result of this was

a very unpleasant walk. I had had the greatest difficulty

to get my boot on in the morning. We were now on

a direct line of communication and were continually

passing wagons, guns etc, going either to the front or

the rear. One ammunition wagon we passed was on fire. A

pleasing sight! The greater part of the march lay through forest. We passed through

HIRSON which had been fortified, abattis etc. Long after dark

and dead tired, we reached our destination ARNOT but not the end of

our walk. We were first marched to the railway station. There

we were met by the commandant, & a lieutenant. The latter

was not a bad sort. The former might have come out of comic

opera. The Hauptman drew his sword shouted, & pranced about.

The lieutenant told us his Captain did not like the English. The day before

A line leading from the adjacent page to a mark(X) after the word English in the line above indicates the insertion of the text "& that in Germany he was a big man politically." 

a party of English prisoners whom, I subsequently discovered were my own

Regt. had been attacked & the garrison had to be threatened with

Transcription saved

 Page  4

that I had had for several days. But we soon saw that we,

and the French, were on quite different footings. Thus whilst

the French were merely asked if they had any weapons, we

were minutely searched. They also wanted us to give our

parole not to escape; of course we did nothing of the 

kind. It was further intimated that if one of us escaped,

the others would be shot. This may have been bluff,

or it may not. In any case, they were taking no

chances. All the officers' escort was concentrated in

our part of the compartment, the French being more or

less unguarded. We did not progress very far by rail. 

When we were derailed, it appeared that the

French in their retreat had blown up a big viaduct,

and numerous bridges; that the real rail head

was some 26 kilometres away. The result of this was

a very unpleasant walk. I had had the greatest difficulty

to get my boot on in the morning. We were now on

a direct line of communication and were continually

passing wagons, guns etc, going either to the front or

the rear. One ammunition wagon we passed was on fire. A

pleasing sight! The greater part of the march lay through forest. We passed through

HIRSON which had been fortified, abattis etc. Long after dark

and dead tired, we reached our destination ARNOT but not the end of

our walk. We were first marched to the railway station. There

we were met by the commandant, & a lieutenant. The latter

was not a bad sort. The former might have come out of comic

opera. The Hauptman drew his sword shouted, & pranced about.

The lieutenant told us his Captain did not like the English. The day before

A line leading from the adjacent page to a mark(X) after the word English in the line above indicates the insertion of the text "& that in Germany he was a big man politically." 

a party of English prisoners whom, I subsequently discovered were my own

Regt. had been attacked & the garrison had to be threatened with


Transcription history
  • November 4, 2017 00:56:30 Thomas A. Lingner

     Page  4

    that I had had for several days. But we soon saw that we,

    and the French, were on quite different footings. Thus whilst

    the French were merely asked if they had any weapons, we

    were minutely searched. They also wanted us to give our

    parole not to escape; of course we did nothing of the 

    kind. It was further intimated that if one of us escaped,

    the others would be shot. This may have been bluff,

    or it may not. In any case, they were taking no

    chances. All the officers' escort was concentrated in

    our part of the compartment, the French being more or

    less unguarded. We did not progress very far by rail. 

    When we were derailed, it appeared that the

    French in their retreat had blown up a big viaduct,

    and numerous bridges; that the real rail head

    was some 26 kilometres away. The result of this was

    a very unpleasant walk. I had had the greatest difficulty

    to get my boot on in the morning. We were now on

    a direct line of communication and were continually

    passing wagons, guns etc, going either to the front or

    the rear. One ammunition wagon we passed was on fire. A

    pleasing sight! The greater part of the march lay through forest. We passed through

    HIRSON which had been fortified, abattis etc. Long after dark

    and dead tired, we reached our destination ARNOT but not the end of

    our walk. We were first marched to the railway station. There

    we were met by the commandant, & a lieutenant. The latter

    was not a bad sort. The former might have come out of comic

    opera. The Hauptman drew his sword shouted, & pranced about.

    The lieutenant told us his Captain did not like the English. The day before

    A line leading from the adjacent page to a mark(X) after the word English in the line above indicates the insertion of the text "& that in Germany he was a big man politically." 

    a party of English prisoners whom, I subsequently discovered were my own

    Regt. had been attacked & the garrison had to be threatened with

  • June 17, 2017 17:30:45 L G

                                                                       4

    that I had had for several days. But we soon saw that we,

    and the French, were on quite different footings. Thus whilst

    the French were merely asked if they had any weapons, we

    were minutely searched. They also wanted us to give our

    parole not to escape; of course we did nothing of the 

    kind. It was further intimated that if one of us escaped,

    the others would be shot. This may have been bluff,

    or it may not. In any cases, they were taking no

    chances. All the officers' escourt was concentrated in

    our part of the compartment, the French being more or

    less unguarded. We did not progress very far by rail. 

    When we were disembarked derailed, it appeared that the

    French in their retreat had blown up a big viaduct,

    and numerous bridges; and that the real rail head

    was some 26 kilometres away.  The result of this was

    a very unpleasant walk. I had had the greatest difficulty

    to get my boot on in the morning. We were now on

    a direct line of communication and were continually

    passing wagons, guns etc, going either to the front or

    the rear. One ammunition wagon we passed was on fire. A

    [insert] pleasing sight! [/insert] The greater part of the march lay through forest. We passed through

    one place  HIRSON which had been fortified, abattis etc. X Long after dark

    and dead tired, we reached our destination ^[insert] ARNOT [/insert] but not the end of

    our walk. We were first marched to the railway station. There

    we were met by the commanant, & a lieutenant. The latter

    was not a bad sort. The former might have come out of comic

    opera. He The Hauptman drew his sword and shouted , & pranced about

    The lieutenant told us he ^[insert] his Captain [/insert] did not like the English X The day before

    A line leading from the adjacent page to a mark(X) after the word English in the line above indicates the insertion of the text "& that in Germany he was a big man politically." 

    a party of English ^[insert] prisoners [/insert] whom,  I subsequently discovered were my own

    Regt. had been attacked & the garrison had to be threatened with


  • June 17, 2017 17:30:38 L G

                                                                       4

    that I had had for several days. But we soon saw that we,

    and the French, were on quite different footings. Thus whilst

    the French were merely asked if they had any weapons, we

    were minutely searched. They also wanted us to give our

    parole not to escape; of course we did nothing of the 

    kind. It was further intimated that if one of us escaped,

    the others would be shot. This may have been bluff,

    or it may not. In any cases, they were taking no

    chances. All the officers' escourt was concentrated in

    our part of the compartment, the French being more or

    less unguarded. We did not progress very far by rail. 

    When we were disembarked derailed, it appeared that the

    French in their retreat had blown up a big viaduct,

    and numerous bridges; and that the real rail head

    was some 26 kilometres away.  The result of this was

    a very unpleasant walk. I had had the greatest difficulty

    to get my boot on in the morning. We were now on

    a direct line of communication and were continually

    passing wagons, guns etc, going either to the front or

    the rear. One ammunition wagon we passed was on fire. A

    [insert] pleasing sight! [/insert] The greater part of the march lay through forest. We passed through

    one place  HIRSON which had been fortified, abattis etc. X Long after dark

    and dead tired, we reached our destination ^[insert] ARNOT [/insert] but not the end of

    our walk. We were first marched to the railway station. There

    we were met by the commanant, & a lieutenant. The latter

    was not a bad sort. The former might have come out of comic

    opera. He The Hauptman drew his sword and shouted , & pranced about

    The lieutenant told us he ^[insert] his Captain [/insert] did not like the English X The day before

    A line leading from the adjacent page to a mark(X) after the word english in the line above indicates the insertion of the text "& that in Germany he was a big man politically." 

    a party of English ^[insert] prisoners [/insert] whom,  I subsequently discovered were my own

    Regt. had been attacked & the garrison had to be threatened with


  • June 17, 2017 17:30:19 L G

                                                                       4

    that I had had for several days. But we soon saw that we,

    and the French, were on quite different footings. Thus whilst

    the French were merely asked if they had any weapons, we

    were minutely searched. They also wanted us to give our

    parole not to escape; of course we did nothing of the 

    kind. It was further intimated that if one of us escaped,

    the others would be shot. This may have been bluff,

    or it may not. In any cases, they were taking no

    chances. All the officers' escourt was concentrated in

    our part of the compartment, the French being more or

    less unguarded. We did not progress very far by rail. 

    When we were disembarked derailed, it appeared that the

    French in their retreat had blown up a big viaduct,

    and numerous bridges; and that the real rail head

    was some 26 kilometres away.  The result of this was

    a very unpleasant walk. I had had the greatest difficulty

    to get my boot on in the morning. We were now on

    a direct line of communication and were continually

    passing wagons, guns etc, going either to the front or

    the rear. One ammunition wagon we passed was on fire. A

    [insert] pleasing sight! [/insert] The greater part of the march lay through forest. We passed through

    one place  HIRSON which had been fortified, abattis etc. X Long after dark

    and dead tired, we reached our destination ^[insert] ARNOT [/insert] but not the end of

    our walk. We were first marched to the railway station. There

    we were met by the commanant, & a lieutenant. The latter

    was not a bad sort. The former might have come out of comic

    opera. He The Hauptman drew his sword and shouted , & pranced about

    The lieutenant told us he ^[insert] his Captain [/insert] did not like the English X The day before

     A line leading from the adjacent page to a mark(X) after the word english in the line above indicates the insertion of the text "& that in Germany he was a big man politically." 

    a party of English ^[insert] prisoners [/insert] whom,  I subsequently discovered were my own

    Regt. had been attacked & the garrison had to be threatened with


  • June 17, 2017 16:23:55 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                       4

    that I had had for several days. But we soon saw that we,

    and the French, were on quite different footings. Thus whilst

    the French were merely asked if they had any weapons, we

    were minutely searched. They also wanted us to give our

    parole not to escape; of course we did nothing of the 

    kind. It was further intimated that if one of us escaped,

    the others would be shot; This may have been bluff,

    or it may not. In any cases, they were taking no

    chances. All the officers' escourt was concentrated in

    our part of the compartment, the French being more or

    less unguarded. We did not progress very far by rail. 

    When we were disembarked derailed; it appeared that the

    French in their retreat had blown up a big viaduct,

    and numerous bridges; and that the real rail head

    was some 26 kilometres away.  The result of this was

    a very unpleasant walk. I had had the greatest difficulty

    to get my boot on in the morning. We were now on

    a direct line of communication and were continually

    passing wagons, guns etc, going either to the front or

    the rear. One ammunition wagon we passed was on fire. A

    [insert] pleasing sight! [/insert] The greater part of the march lay through forest. We passed through

    one place  HIRSON which had been fortified, abattis the X Long after dark

    and dead tired, we reached our destination ^[insert] ARNOT [/insert] but not the end of

    our walk. We were first marched to the railway station. There

    we were met by the commanant, & a lieutenant. The latter

    was not a bad sort. The former might have come out of comic

    opera. He The Hauptman drew his sword and shouted , & pranced about

    The lieutenant told us he ^[insert] his Captain [/insert] did not like the English X The day before

    a party of English ^[insert] prisoners [/insert] whom,  I subsequently discovered were my own

    Regt. had been attacked & the garrison had to be threatened with


  • June 16, 2017 22:48:45 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                       4

    that I had had for several days. But we soon saw that we,

    and the French, were on quite different footings. Thus whilst

    the French were merely asked if they had any weapons, we

    were minutely searched. They also wanted us to give our

    parole not to escape; of course we did nothing of the 

    kind. It was further intimated that if one of us escaped,

    the others would be shot; This may have been bluff,

    or it may not. In any case


  • June 16, 2017 22:44:44 Annick Rodriguez

                                                                       4

    that I had had


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    ID
    3963 / 243321
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Toby Backhouse
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


    • English

    • Western Front

    • Prisoners of War



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