POW diaries - Captain Percival Lowe, item 7

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1.  Written in the upper right corner 

Sept 20th 1914. My first clear impression was, that I was in the enemy's

field Hospital. This was in a farm building. We were halted and allowed

to lie down. Immediately we were surrounded by a crowd of inquisitive

soldiers. They seemed none too pleased too see us! I on the outside of

the circle we had formed, was kicked by one of these apostles of

culture, in the ribs. After waiting about an hour or so it was

evident that this hospital would have nothing to do with us.

We left one of our number who was too badly wounded to move here, and continued

our journey. We were a party of between 50 + 60, all wounded.

We were marched at a slow pace, apparently along a road which

ran more or less parallel to the Aisne. We passed the batteries

which had been shelling us in the morning, and the captive

sausage shaped balloon which had directed their fire. We met a large number of troops, 

who were for the most part abusive. The walk seemed interminable.

It was night when we reached a small town.

Here again the hospital would have none of us. Later we were

placed in a church. This had been laid out with matresses

for the wounded - the enemy's wounded. We were all placed in

a kind of chapel. I think there was straw on the floor. Our

captors gave us nothing to eat. At a later hour however

a French sister of mercy brought us bread and soup - and

kind words. We were naturally surrounded by a ring of bayonets.

It was very cold. Fortunately I had a flask of whiskey.

 

 Lines drawn leading from the adjacent page indicating this place for the insertion of the text: 

To give the devil his due it is but

fair to state that I had has as yet neither

money nor personal property removed.

 

We three officers had a nip and then managed to doze.

Sept 21st After being given some so called coffee we were ordered to fall

in and march. After a comparatively short walk we reached our

destination LAON. This is a town perched on the top of a hill. And to

the very apex we went. Here we had to wait on the side of the

street, whilst herds of the enemy, slightly wounded, were marched

past. It was surprising the number that seemed to be hit in

Transcription saved

1.  Written in the upper right corner 

Sept 20th 1914. My first clear impression was, that I was in the enemy's

field Hospital. This was in a farm building. We were halted and allowed

to lie down. Immediately we were surrounded by a crowd of inquisitive

soldiers. They seemed none too pleased too see us! I on the outside of

the circle we had formed, was kicked by one of these apostles of

culture, in the ribs. After waiting about an hour or so it was

evident that this hospital would have nothing to do with us.

We left one of our number who was too badly wounded to move here, and continued

our journey. We were a party of between 50 + 60, all wounded.

We were marched at a slow pace, apparently along a road which

ran more or less parallel to the Aisne. We passed the batteries

which had been shelling us in the morning, and the captive

sausage shaped balloon which had directed their fire. We met a large number of troops, 

who were for the most part abusive. The walk seemed interminable.

It was night when we reached a small town.

Here again the hospital would have none of us. Later we were

placed in a church. This had been laid out with matresses

for the wounded - the enemy's wounded. We were all placed in

a kind of chapel. I think there was straw on the floor. Our

captors gave us nothing to eat. At a later hour however

a French sister of mercy brought us bread and soup - and

kind words. We were naturally surrounded by a ring of bayonets.

It was very cold. Fortunately I had a flask of whiskey.

 

 Lines drawn leading from the adjacent page indicating this place for the insertion of the text: 

To give the devil his due it is but

fair to state that I had has as yet neither

money nor personal property removed.

 

We three officers had a nip and then managed to doze.

Sept 21st After being given some so called coffee we were ordered to fall

in and march. After a comparatively short walk we reached our

destination LAON. This is a town perched on the top of a hill. And to

the very apex we went. Here we had to wait on the side of the

street, whilst herds of the enemy, slightly wounded, were marched

past. It was surprising the number that seemed to be hit in


Transcription history
  • November 3, 2017 21:54:02 Thomas A. Lingner

    1.  Written in the upper right corner 

    Sept 20th 1914. My first clear impression was, that I was in the enemy's

    field Hospital. This was in a farm building. We were halted and allowed

    to lie down. Immediately we were surrounded by a crowd of inquisitive

    soldiers. They seemed none too pleased too see us! I on the outside of

    the circle we had formed, was kicked by one of these apostles of

    culture, in the ribs. After waiting about an hour or so it was

    evident that this hospital would have nothing to do with us.

    We left one of our number who was too badly wounded to move here, and continued

    our journey. We were a party of between 50 + 60, all wounded.

    We were marched at a slow pace, apparently along a road which

    ran more or less parallel to the Aisne. We passed the batteries

    which had been shelling us in the morning, and the captive

    sausage shaped balloon which had directed their fire. We met a large number of troops, 

    who were for the most part abusive. The walk seemed interminable.

    It was night when we reached a small town.

    Here again the hospital would have none of us. Later we were

    placed in a church. This had been laid out with matresses

    for the wounded - the enemy's wounded. We were all placed in

    a kind of chapel. I think there was straw on the floor. Our

    captors gave us nothing to eat. At a later hour however

    a French sister of mercy brought us bread and soup - and

    kind words. We were naturally surrounded by a ring of bayonets.

    It was very cold. Fortunately I had a flask of whiskey.

     

     Lines drawn leading from the adjacent page indicating this place for the insertion of the text: 

    To give the devil his due it is but

    fair to state that I had has as yet neither

    money nor personal property removed.

     

    We three officers had a nip and then managed to doze.

    Sept 21st After being given some so called coffee we were ordered to fall

    in and march. After a comparatively short walk we reached our

    destination LAON. This is a town perched on the top of a hill. And to

    the very apex we went. Here we had to wait on the side of the

    street, whilst herds of the enemy, slightly wounded, were marched

    past. It was surprising the number that seemed to be hit in


  • November 3, 2017 21:52:47 Thomas A. Lingner

    1.  Written in the upper right corner 

    Sept 20th 1914. My first clear impression was, that I was in the enemy's

    field Hospital. This was in a farm building. We were halted and allowed

    to lie down. Immediately we were surrounded by a crowd of inquisitive

    soldiers. They seemed none too pleased too see us! I on the outside of

    the circle we had formed, was kicked by one of these apostles of

    culture, in the ribs. After waiting about an hour or so it was

    evident that this hospital would have nothing to do with us.

    We left one of our number who was too badly wounded to move here, and continued

    our journey. We were a party of between 50 + 60, all wounded.

    We were marched at a slow pace, apparently along a road which

    ran more or less parallel to the Aisne. We passed the batteries

    which had been shelling us in the morning, and the  captive 

    sausage shaped balloon which had directed their fire. We met a large number of troops, 

    who were for the most part abusive. The walk seemed interminable.

    It was night when we reached a small town.

    Here again the hospital would have none of us. Later we were

    placed in a church. This had been laid out with matresses

    for the wounded - the enemy's wounded. We were all placed in

    a kind of chapel. I think there was straw on the floor. Our

    captors gave us nothing to eat. At a later hour however

    a French sister of mercy brought us bread and soup - and

    kind words. We were naturally surrounded by a ring of bayonets.

    It was very cold. Fortunately I had a flask of whiskey.

     

    Lines drawn leading from the adjacent page indicating this place for the insertion of the text:

    To give the devil his due it is but

    fair to state that I had has as  yet neither

    money nor personal property removed.

     

    We three officers had a nip and then managed to doze.

    Sept 21st After being given some so called coffee we were ordered to fall

    in and march. After a comparatively short walk we reached our

    destination LAON. This is a town perched on the top of a hill. And to

    the very apex we went. Here we had to wait on the side of the

    street, whilst herds of the enemy, slightly wounded, were marched

    past. It was surprising the number that seemed to be hit in


  • June 16, 2017 11:41:09 L G

    1.  Written in the upper right corner 

    Sept 20th 1914. My first clear impression was that I was in the enemy's

    field Hospital. This was in a farm building. We were halted and allowed

    to lie down. Immediately we were surrounded by a crowd of inquisitive

    soldiers. They seemed none too pleased too see us! I on the outside of

    the circle we has formed, was kicked by one of these apostles of

    culture, in the ribs. After waiting about an hour or so it was

    evident that this hospital would have nothing to do with us.

    We left one of our number who was too badly wounded to move here, and continued

    our journey. We were a party of between 50 + 60, all wounded.

    We were marched at a slow pace, apparently along a road which

    ran more or less parallel to the Aisne. We passed the batteries

    which had been shelling us in the morning, and the  captive 

    sausage shaped balloon which had directed their fire. We met a large number of troops, 

    who were for the most part abusive. The walk seemed interminable.

    It was night when we reached a small town.

    Here again the hospital would have none of us. Later we were

    placed in a church. This had been laid out with matresses

    for the wounded- the enemy's wounded. We were all placed in

    a kind of chapel. I think there was straw on the floor. Our

    captors gave us nothing to eat. At a later hour however

    a French sister of mercy brought us bread and soup- and

    kind words. We were naturally surrounded by a ring of bayonets.

    It was very cold. Fortunately I had a flask of whiskey.

     

    Lines drawn leading from the adjacent page indicating this place for the insertion of the text:

    To give the devil his due it is but

    fair to state that I had has as  yet neither

    money nor personal property removed.

     

    We three officers had a nip and then managed to doze.

    Sept 21st After being given some so called coffee we were ordered to fall

    in and march. After a comparatively short walk we reached our

    destination LAON. This is a town perched on the top of a hill. And to

    the very apex we went. Here we had to wait on the side of the

    street, whilst herds of the enemy, slightly wounded, were marched

    past. It was surprising the number that seemed to be hit in


Description

Save description
  • 49.564133||3.61989||

    Laon, France

Location(s)
  • Document location Laon, France


ID
3963 / 243316
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
Toby Backhouse
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


  • English

  • Western Front

  • Prisoners of War



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