Letters from James Murtagh, item 13

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 left page 


 King George's Seal 


He whom this scroll commemorates

was numbered among those who,

at the call of King and Country, left all

that was dear to them, endured hardness,

faced danger, and finally passed out of

the sight of men by the path of duty 

and self-sacrifice, giving up their own

lives that others might live in freedom.

  Let those who come after see to it

  that his name be not forgotten.


Pte. James C. Murtagh

Royal Fusiliers


Memorial Scroll


 right page 


A Brief history of the 37th Division


 image of a horseshoe 


Raised for the Sixth New Army, the 37th Division began to form in March 1915. It was originally known 

as 44th Division. A War Office decision to convert the Fourth New Army into training units and to 

replace 16th (Irish) Division in Second New Army led to it being "promoted." It now became 37th 

Division and was in Second New Army, and a Divisional HQ was established at Andover on 12 April 

1915. Many units that had been formed for a while came into its command. 


In April 1915 the Division concentrated at Cholderton on Salisbury Plain and on 25 June the units were 

inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill. On 22 July 1915 the Division began to cross the English 

Channel and by 2 August all units were concentrated near Tilques. 


The Division then remained on the Western Front for the remainder of the war and took part in the 

following engagements:


1916

The Battle of the Ancre


1917

The First Battle of the Scarpe, including the capture of Monchy-le-Preux

The Second Battle of the Scarpe

The Battle of Arleux

The Battle of Pilkem Ridge

The Battle of the Menin Road Bridge

The Battle of Polygon Wood

The Battle of Broodseinde

The Battle of Poelcapelle

The First Battle of Passchendaele



Transcription saved

 left page 


 King George's Seal 


He whom this scroll commemorates

was numbered among those who,

at the call of King and Country, left all

that was dear to them, endured hardness,

faced danger, and finally passed out of

the sight of men by the path of duty 

and self-sacrifice, giving up their own

lives that others might live in freedom.

  Let those who come after see to it

  that his name be not forgotten.


Pte. James C. Murtagh

Royal Fusiliers


Memorial Scroll


 right page 


A Brief history of the 37th Division


 image of a horseshoe 


Raised for the Sixth New Army, the 37th Division began to form in March 1915. It was originally known 

as 44th Division. A War Office decision to convert the Fourth New Army into training units and to 

replace 16th (Irish) Division in Second New Army led to it being "promoted." It now became 37th 

Division and was in Second New Army, and a Divisional HQ was established at Andover on 12 April 

1915. Many units that had been formed for a while came into its command. 


In April 1915 the Division concentrated at Cholderton on Salisbury Plain and on 25 June the units were 

inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill. On 22 July 1915 the Division began to cross the English 

Channel and by 2 August all units were concentrated near Tilques. 


The Division then remained on the Western Front for the remainder of the war and took part in the 

following engagements:


1916

The Battle of the Ancre


1917

The First Battle of the Scarpe, including the capture of Monchy-le-Preux

The Second Battle of the Scarpe

The Battle of Arleux

The Battle of Pilkem Ridge

The Battle of the Menin Road Bridge

The Battle of Polygon Wood

The Battle of Broodseinde

The Battle of Poelcapelle

The First Battle of Passchendaele




Transcription history
  • January 14, 2018 17:22:45 Thomas A. Lingner

     left page 


     King George's Seal 


    He whom this scroll commemorates

    was numbered among those who,

    at the call of King and Country, left all

    that was dear to them, endured hardness,

    faced danger, and finally passed out of

    the sight of men by the path of duty 

    and self-sacrifice, giving up their own

    lives that others might live in freedom.

      Let those who come after see to it

      that his name be not forgotten.


    Pte. James C. Murtagh

    Royal Fusiliers


    Memorial Scroll


     right page 


    A Brief history of the 37th Division


     image of a horseshoe 


    Raised for the Sixth New Army, the 37th Division began to form in March 1915. It was originally known 

    as 44th Division. A War Office decision to convert the Fourth New Army into training units and to 

    replace 16th (Irish) Division in Second New Army led to it being "promoted." It now became 37th 

    Division and was in Second New Army, and a Divisional HQ was established at Andover on 12 April 

    1915. Many units that had been formed for a while came into its command. 


    In April 1915 the Division concentrated at Cholderton on Salisbury Plain and on 25 June the units were 

    inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill. On 22 July 1915 the Division began to cross the English 

    Channel and by 2 August all units were concentrated near Tilques. 


    The Division then remained on the Western Front for the remainder of the war and took part in the 

    following engagements:


    1916

    The Battle of the Ancre


    1917

    The First Battle of the Scarpe, including the capture of Monchy-le-Preux

    The Second Battle of the Scarpe

    The Battle of Arleux

    The Battle of Pilkem Ridge

    The Battle of the Menin Road Bridge

    The Battle of Polygon Wood

    The Battle of Broodseinde

    The Battle of Poelcapelle

    The First Battle of Passchendaele




  • January 14, 2018 17:17:11 Thomas A. Lingner

     left page 


     King George's Seal 


    He whom this scroll commemorates

    was numbered among those who,

    at the call of King and Country, left all

    that was dear to them, endured hardness,

    faced danger, and finally passed out of

    the sight of men by the path of duty 

    and self-sacrifice, giving up their own

    lives that others might live in freedom.

      Let those who come after see to it

      that his name be not forgotten.


    Pte. James C. Murtagh

    Royal Fusiliers


Description

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    Location(s)


    ID
    3798 / 46809
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Maine Delaney
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front




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