Letters from James Murtagh, item 10

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 LEFT PAGE 


Regimental History Extract


 Left column, page 149 

BATTLE OF THE ANCRE, NOVEMBER 14th  

battalion was reorganized about 2 a.m. on November 14th,

and at 6 a.m. the Fusiliers attacked once more. It was 

at this point that the 7th Battalion came into contact

with the 13th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, who attacked

between the 13th Rifle Brigade and the 13th King's Royal

Rifle Corps. The 13th moved off a little too eagerly and

suffered some casualties from our own barrage. They 

withdrew 50 yards and then resumed the advance under

a harassing machine gun fire from the Beaucourt village.

A strong point on the left flank resisted with great determination,

and the 13th Rifle Brigade were to the rear of

the 13th Royal Fusiliers when the first objective was

taken. Meanwhile, Captain Goddard, with the 7th, had

amalgamated the battalion's two waves, and after one

and a half hours' shelling of the final objective, advanced

and took it without much opposition. He had turned

to the right and with elements of the 13th Battalion, the

13th K.R.R.C., and the H.A.C., consolidated the right

flank on the bank of the Ancre, south-east of Beaucourt,

which had fallen a little earlier to the charge of Freyberg's 

force.

  Up to this point the position on the left of the 13th 

Battalion still caused trouble. Most of the casualties

suffered by the 7th in their advance to the final objective

had come from this quarter, and the 13th remained on

the first line captured. But the 10th Battalion, who, like

the 13th, belonged to the 111th Brigade, had had the

pleasant experience of co-operating with a tank in the 

reduction of the German redoubt which had held up the

centre of the 63rd Division. The mere appearance of the

tank seems to have been sufficient, and without firing a 

shot the 10th Battalion took 270 German prisoners,* and

three machine guns. They also liberated 60 British

prisoners who had been well treated, but were naturally 

glad to get back to their own army. The 7th Battalion

passed from this area and the 13th did not figure in again in 

the battle. The former had attacked 22 officers and

 note at bottom of page 

*Eight hundred prisoners in all were taken from this redoubt.

 right column, page 150 

ROYAL FUSILIERS IN THE GREAT WAR


629 other ranks strong. They lost 13 officers and 331

other ranks, more than half the total strength. The 

casualties of the 13th were 8 officers (including Lieut.-

Colonel Ardagh, wounded) and 130 other ranks. But the 

victory was complete. It was a great blow to German

prestige, and it made an important improvement in the 

British positions.

* * * *

There were still some local operations in this area before

the battle died down and a final line could be organised

for winter. The 10th Battalion took a prominent part

in these attempts to round off the gains of the first three

days. Part of the final line still remained in German

hands. The 13th Battalion, on the morning of the 14th,

had been held up by opposition on its left, and patrols 

sent out failed even to locate the objective. Muck Trench,

as it was called, continued to lure the 111th Brigade, and

the 10th Battalion attacked at dawn on November 16th

with the object of capturing it. They were beaten back

by intense machine gun fire. In the afternoon two

bombing parties attempted to get forward and actually

reached the trench, but they were promptly attacked by

superior forces and compelled to retire. Lieutenant R.

Stephenson was killed on this occasion. The German 

barrage prevented a third attempt, but Second Lieutenant

Ground succeeded in establishing two posts in the trench

on the left before dusk, and two others were established

during the night by Second Lieutenant Bainbridge.

These posts were reinforced and organized. But during 

the night of the 17th the machine gun team in the trench

was shelled and almost wiped out. At 6.10 a.m. on the

18th the battalion attacked on the right of the 32nd

Division and stormed all its objectives but one. Unfortunately

these gains had to abandoned owing to the

failure of the right of the 32nd Division. On November 

19th the 10th delivered yet another attack. Two patrols,

under Second Lieutenants Bainbridge and Heywood,

respectively, reached the objective, but were compelled

 end of first clipping 

 second clipping, page 151 

END OF THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME

to withdraw. During the night the battalion was relieved

after an extraordinary exhibition of tenacity of purpose.

  The most important and most spectacular achievement

of the Fusiliers in the battle of Ancre was the capture

of the redoubt which had almost brought the advance to 

a standstill. But it was the least difficult task, and the 

10th, who accomplished it, did more distinguished service

in the following days, though their repeated attacks merely

served to secure a few points of tactical importance.


 RIGHT PAGE 


 ornate border showing silhouetted scenes of soldiers, medals, and other elements 


IRELAND'S MEMORIAL RECORDS 1914-1918


MURRIE, JOHN WILLIAM COWELL.

Reg. No. 43300. Rank, Private, Northumberland

Fusiliers (Tyneside Irish); died,

France, April 28, 1817; born Amble, Northumberland


MURRIN, PATRICK. Reg. No. 2247-

Rank, Private, Irish Guards, 1st Batt.: killed

in action, France, April 5, 1915; born

Killybegs, Co. Donegal.


MURTAGH, CHRISTOPHER. Reg. No.

17624. Rank, Lance-Corporal, Royal Dublin

Fusiliers, 8th Batt.; died of wounds, France,

April 29, 1916; born Dublin.


MURTAGH, JAMES. Reg. No. 26565.

Rank, Private, Royal Irish Regiment, 7th

Batt.; killed in action, France, October 23, 

1918; born Meath.


MURTAGH, JAMES. Reg. No. 27177.

Rank, Private, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers,

1st Batt.: killed in action, January 27, 1917;

born Dungannon, Co. Tyrone.


MURTAGH, JAMES C. Reg. No. 5192.

Rank, Private, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers,

1st Batt.: killed in action, January 27, 1917;

born Dungannon, Co. Tyrone.


MURTAGH, JOHN. Reg. No. 8871.

Rank, Corporal, Royal Irish Rifles, 1st Batt.;

killed in action, France, May 9, 1915, born

Newry, Co. Down.


MURTAGH, JOHN. Reg. No. 9281.

Rank, Private, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers,

1st Batt.; died of wounds, Egypt, September

20, 1915; born Bulgriffin


MURTAGH, JOHN. Reg. No. 18477.

Rank, Private, Royal Irish Fusiliers, 1st Batt.;

killed in action, France, October 12, 1916;

born Dromiskin, Co. Louth.


MURTAGH, MICHAEL. Rank. Private,

Connaught Rangers; killed in action, France,

1915, born Ireland; age 24.


MURTAGH, MICHAEL. Reg. No. 10139.

Rank, Private, 2nd Leinster Regiment; died

of wounds, France, April 10, 1915; born

Portumna, Co. Galway.


MURTAGH, MICHAEL. Reg. No. 40027.

Rank, Rifleman, 7th Royal Irish Rifles;

killed in action, France, August 16, 1917;

born Clayton, Co. Mayo.


MURTAGH, PATRICK. Reg. No. 4356.

Rank, Private, Irish Guards, 1st Batt.; died,

France, April 23, 1916; born Forkhill, Co.

Armagh.


MURTAGH, PATRICK. Reg. No. 13060

Rank, Guardsman, Grenadier Guards, 1st

Batt.; killed in action, France, October 26,

1914; born Knock, Ballyhaunis, Co. Mayo.


MURTAGH, PATRICK. Reg. No. 219973.

Rank, Driver, Royal Field Artillery (formerly

Royal Army Service Corps); killed in

action, France, February 18, 1918; born

Castlebar, Co. Mayo.


MURTAGH, ROBERT. Reg. No. 8118.

Rank, Lance-Corporal, Connaught Rangers,

1st Batt.; killed in action, Mesopotamia,

January 21, 1916; born Dublin.



Transcription saved

 LEFT PAGE 


Regimental History Extract


 Left column, page 149 

BATTLE OF THE ANCRE, NOVEMBER 14th  

battalion was reorganized about 2 a.m. on November 14th,

and at 6 a.m. the Fusiliers attacked once more. It was 

at this point that the 7th Battalion came into contact

with the 13th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, who attacked

between the 13th Rifle Brigade and the 13th King's Royal

Rifle Corps. The 13th moved off a little too eagerly and

suffered some casualties from our own barrage. They 

withdrew 50 yards and then resumed the advance under

a harassing machine gun fire from the Beaucourt village.

A strong point on the left flank resisted with great determination,

and the 13th Rifle Brigade were to the rear of

the 13th Royal Fusiliers when the first objective was

taken. Meanwhile, Captain Goddard, with the 7th, had

amalgamated the battalion's two waves, and after one

and a half hours' shelling of the final objective, advanced

and took it without much opposition. He had turned

to the right and with elements of the 13th Battalion, the

13th K.R.R.C., and the H.A.C., consolidated the right

flank on the bank of the Ancre, south-east of Beaucourt,

which had fallen a little earlier to the charge of Freyberg's 

force.

  Up to this point the position on the left of the 13th 

Battalion still caused trouble. Most of the casualties

suffered by the 7th in their advance to the final objective

had come from this quarter, and the 13th remained on

the first line captured. But the 10th Battalion, who, like

the 13th, belonged to the 111th Brigade, had had the

pleasant experience of co-operating with a tank in the 

reduction of the German redoubt which had held up the

centre of the 63rd Division. The mere appearance of the

tank seems to have been sufficient, and without firing a 

shot the 10th Battalion took 270 German prisoners,* and

three machine guns. They also liberated 60 British

prisoners who had been well treated, but were naturally 

glad to get back to their own army. The 7th Battalion

passed from this area and the 13th did not figure in again in 

the battle. The former had attacked 22 officers and

 note at bottom of page 

*Eight hundred prisoners in all were taken from this redoubt.

 right column, page 150 

ROYAL FUSILIERS IN THE GREAT WAR


629 other ranks strong. They lost 13 officers and 331

other ranks, more than half the total strength. The 

casualties of the 13th were 8 officers (including Lieut.-

Colonel Ardagh, wounded) and 130 other ranks. But the 

victory was complete. It was a great blow to German

prestige, and it made an important improvement in the 

British positions.

* * * *

There were still some local operations in this area before

the battle died down and a final line could be organised

for winter. The 10th Battalion took a prominent part

in these attempts to round off the gains of the first three

days. Part of the final line still remained in German

hands. The 13th Battalion, on the morning of the 14th,

had been held up by opposition on its left, and patrols 

sent out failed even to locate the objective. Muck Trench,

as it was called, continued to lure the 111th Brigade, and

the 10th Battalion attacked at dawn on November 16th

with the object of capturing it. They were beaten back

by intense machine gun fire. In the afternoon two

bombing parties attempted to get forward and actually

reached the trench, but they were promptly attacked by

superior forces and compelled to retire. Lieutenant R.

Stephenson was killed on this occasion. The German 

barrage prevented a third attempt, but Second Lieutenant

Ground succeeded in establishing two posts in the trench

on the left before dusk, and two others were established

during the night by Second Lieutenant Bainbridge.

These posts were reinforced and organized. But during 

the night of the 17th the machine gun team in the trench

was shelled and almost wiped out. At 6.10 a.m. on the

18th the battalion attacked on the right of the 32nd

Division and stormed all its objectives but one. Unfortunately

these gains had to abandoned owing to the

failure of the right of the 32nd Division. On November 

19th the 10th delivered yet another attack. Two patrols,

under Second Lieutenants Bainbridge and Heywood,

respectively, reached the objective, but were compelled

 end of first clipping 

 second clipping, page 151 

END OF THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME

to withdraw. During the night the battalion was relieved

after an extraordinary exhibition of tenacity of purpose.

  The most important and most spectacular achievement

of the Fusiliers in the battle of Ancre was the capture

of the redoubt which had almost brought the advance to 

a standstill. But it was the least difficult task, and the 

10th, who accomplished it, did more distinguished service

in the following days, though their repeated attacks merely

served to secure a few points of tactical importance.


 RIGHT PAGE 


 ornate border showing silhouetted scenes of soldiers, medals, and other elements 


IRELAND'S MEMORIAL RECORDS 1914-1918


MURRIE, JOHN WILLIAM COWELL.

Reg. No. 43300. Rank, Private, Northumberland

Fusiliers (Tyneside Irish); died,

France, April 28, 1817; born Amble, Northumberland


MURRIN, PATRICK. Reg. No. 2247-

Rank, Private, Irish Guards, 1st Batt.: killed

in action, France, April 5, 1915; born

Killybegs, Co. Donegal.


MURTAGH, CHRISTOPHER. Reg. No.

17624. Rank, Lance-Corporal, Royal Dublin

Fusiliers, 8th Batt.; died of wounds, France,

April 29, 1916; born Dublin.


MURTAGH, JAMES. Reg. No. 26565.

Rank, Private, Royal Irish Regiment, 7th

Batt.; killed in action, France, October 23, 

1918; born Meath.


MURTAGH, JAMES. Reg. No. 27177.

Rank, Private, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers,

1st Batt.: killed in action, January 27, 1917;

born Dungannon, Co. Tyrone.


MURTAGH, JAMES C. Reg. No. 5192.

Rank, Private, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers,

1st Batt.: killed in action, January 27, 1917;

born Dungannon, Co. Tyrone.


MURTAGH, JOHN. Reg. No. 8871.

Rank, Corporal, Royal Irish Rifles, 1st Batt.;

killed in action, France, May 9, 1915, born

Newry, Co. Down.


MURTAGH, JOHN. Reg. No. 9281.

Rank, Private, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers,

1st Batt.; died of wounds, Egypt, September

20, 1915; born Bulgriffin


MURTAGH, JOHN. Reg. No. 18477.

Rank, Private, Royal Irish Fusiliers, 1st Batt.;

killed in action, France, October 12, 1916;

born Dromiskin, Co. Louth.


MURTAGH, MICHAEL. Rank. Private,

Connaught Rangers; killed in action, France,

1915, born Ireland; age 24.


MURTAGH, MICHAEL. Reg. No. 10139.

Rank, Private, 2nd Leinster Regiment; died

of wounds, France, April 10, 1915; born

Portumna, Co. Galway.


MURTAGH, MICHAEL. Reg. No. 40027.

Rank, Rifleman, 7th Royal Irish Rifles;

killed in action, France, August 16, 1917;

born Clayton, Co. Mayo.


MURTAGH, PATRICK. Reg. No. 4356.

Rank, Private, Irish Guards, 1st Batt.; died,

France, April 23, 1916; born Forkhill, Co.

Armagh.


MURTAGH, PATRICK. Reg. No. 13060

Rank, Guardsman, Grenadier Guards, 1st

Batt.; killed in action, France, October 26,

1914; born Knock, Ballyhaunis, Co. Mayo.


MURTAGH, PATRICK. Reg. No. 219973.

Rank, Driver, Royal Field Artillery (formerly

Royal Army Service Corps); killed in

action, France, February 18, 1918; born

Castlebar, Co. Mayo.


MURTAGH, ROBERT. Reg. No. 8118.

Rank, Lance-Corporal, Connaught Rangers,

1st Batt.; killed in action, Mesopotamia,

January 21, 1916; born Dublin.




Transcription history
  • January 14, 2018 17:13:48 Thomas A. Lingner

     LEFT PAGE 


    Regimental History Extract


     Left column, page 149 

    BATTLE OF THE ANCRE, NOVEMBER 14th  

    battalion was reorganized about 2 a.m. on November 14th,

    and at 6 a.m. the Fusiliers attacked once more. It was 

    at this point that the 7th Battalion came into contact

    with the 13th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, who attacked

    between the 13th Rifle Brigade and the 13th King's Royal

    Rifle Corps. The 13th moved off a little too eagerly and

    suffered some casualties from our own barrage. They 

    withdrew 50 yards and then resumed the advance under

    a harassing machine gun fire from the Beaucourt village.

    A strong point on the left flank resisted with great determination,

    and the 13th Rifle Brigade were to the rear of

    the 13th Royal Fusiliers when the first objective was

    taken. Meanwhile, Captain Goddard, with the 7th, had

    amalgamated the battalion's two waves, and after one

    and a half hours' shelling of the final objective, advanced

    and took it without much opposition. He had turned

    to the right and with elements of the 13th Battalion, the

    13th K.R.R.C., and the H.A.C., consolidated the right

    flank on the bank of the Ancre, south-east of Beaucourt,

    which had fallen a little earlier to the charge of Freyberg's 

    force.

      Up to this point the position on the left of the 13th 

    Battalion still caused trouble. Most of the casualties

    suffered by the 7th in their advance to the final objective

    had come from this quarter, and the 13th remained on

    the first line captured. But the 10th Battalion, who, like

    the 13th, belonged to the 111th Brigade, had had the

    pleasant experience of co-operating with a tank in the 

    reduction of the German redoubt which had held up the

    centre of the 63rd Division. The mere appearance of the

    tank seems to have been sufficient, and without firing a 

    shot the 10th Battalion took 270 German prisoners,* and

    three machine guns. They also liberated 60 British

    prisoners who had been well treated, but were naturally 

    glad to get back to their own army. The 7th Battalion

    passed from this area and the 13th did not figure in again in 

    the battle. The former had attacked 22 officers and

     note at bottom of page 

    *Eight hundred prisoners in all were taken from this redoubt.

     right column, page 150 

    ROYAL FUSILIERS IN THE GREAT WAR


    629 other ranks strong. They lost 13 officers and 331

    other ranks, more than half the total strength. The 

    casualties of the 13th were 8 officers (including Lieut.-

    Colonel Ardagh, wounded) and 130 other ranks. But the 

    victory was complete. It was a great blow to German

    prestige, and it made an important improvement in the 

    British positions.

    * * * *

    There were still some local operations in this area before

    the battle died down and a final line could be organised

    for winter. The 10th Battalion took a prominent part

    in these attempts to round off the gains of the first three

    days. Part of the final line still remained in German

    hands. The 13th Battalion, on the morning of the 14th,

    had been held up by opposition on its left, and patrols 

    sent out failed even to locate the objective. Muck Trench,

    as it was called, continued to lure the 111th Brigade, and

    the 10th Battalion attacked at dawn on November 16th

    with the object of capturing it. They were beaten back

    by intense machine gun fire. In the afternoon two

    bombing parties attempted to get forward and actually

    reached the trench, but they were promptly attacked by

    superior forces and compelled to retire. Lieutenant R.

    Stephenson was killed on this occasion. The German 

    barrage prevented a third attempt, but Second Lieutenant

    Ground succeeded in establishing two posts in the trench

    on the left before dusk, and two others were established

    during the night by Second Lieutenant Bainbridge.

    These posts were reinforced and organized. But during 

    the night of the 17th the machine gun team in the trench

    was shelled and almost wiped out. At 6.10 a.m. on the

    18th the battalion attacked on the right of the 32nd

    Division and stormed all its objectives but one. Unfortunately

    these gains had to abandoned owing to the

    failure of the right of the 32nd Division. On November 

    19th the 10th delivered yet another attack. Two patrols,

    under Second Lieutenants Bainbridge and Heywood,

    respectively, reached the objective, but were compelled

     end of first clipping 

     second clipping, page 151 

    END OF THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME

    to withdraw. During the night the battalion was relieved

    after an extraordinary exhibition of tenacity of purpose.

      The most important and most spectacular achievement

    of the Fusiliers in the battle of Ancre was the capture

    of the redoubt which had almost brought the advance to 

    a standstill. But it was the least difficult task, and the 

    10th, who accomplished it, did more distinguished service

    in the following days, though their repeated attacks merely

    served to secure a few points of tactical importance.


     RIGHT PAGE 


     ornate border showing silhouetted scenes of soldiers, medals, and other elements 


    IRELAND'S MEMORIAL RECORDS 1914-1918


    MURRIE, JOHN WILLIAM COWELL.

    Reg. No. 43300. Rank, Private, Northumberland

    Fusiliers (Tyneside Irish); died,

    France, April 28, 1817; born Amble, Northumberland


    MURRIN, PATRICK. Reg. No. 2247-

    Rank, Private, Irish Guards, 1st Batt.: killed

    in action, France, April 5, 1915; born

    Killybegs, Co. Donegal.


    MURTAGH, CHRISTOPHER. Reg. No.

    17624. Rank, Lance-Corporal, Royal Dublin

    Fusiliers, 8th Batt.; died of wounds, France,

    April 29, 1916; born Dublin.


    MURTAGH, JAMES. Reg. No. 26565.

    Rank, Private, Royal Irish Regiment, 7th

    Batt.; killed in action, France, October 23, 

    1918; born Meath.


    MURTAGH, JAMES. Reg. No. 27177.

    Rank, Private, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers,

    1st Batt.: killed in action, January 27, 1917;

    born Dungannon, Co. Tyrone.


    MURTAGH, JAMES C. Reg. No. 5192.

    Rank, Private, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers,

    1st Batt.: killed in action, January 27, 1917;

    born Dungannon, Co. Tyrone.


    MURTAGH, JOHN. Reg. No. 8871.

    Rank, Corporal, Royal Irish Rifles, 1st Batt.;

    killed in action, France, May 9, 1915, born

    Newry, Co. Down.


    MURTAGH, JOHN. Reg. No. 9281.

    Rank, Private, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers,

    1st Batt.; died of wounds, Egypt, September

    20, 1915; born Bulgriffin


    MURTAGH, JOHN. Reg. No. 18477.

    Rank, Private, Royal Irish Fusiliers, 1st Batt.;

    killed in action, France, October 12, 1916;

    born Dromiskin, Co. Louth.


    MURTAGH, MICHAEL. Rank. Private,

    Connaught Rangers; killed in action, France,

    1915, born Ireland; age 24.


    MURTAGH, MICHAEL. Reg. No. 10139.

    Rank, Private, 2nd Leinster Regiment; died

    of wounds, France, April 10, 1915; born

    Portumna, Co. Galway.


    MURTAGH, MICHAEL. Reg. No. 40027.

    Rank, Rifleman, 7th Royal Irish Rifles;

    killed in action, France, August 16, 1917;

    born Clayton, Co. Mayo.


    MURTAGH, PATRICK. Reg. No. 4356.

    Rank, Private, Irish Guards, 1st Batt.; died,

    France, April 23, 1916; born Forkhill, Co.

    Armagh.


    MURTAGH, PATRICK. Reg. No. 13060

    Rank, Guardsman, Grenadier Guards, 1st

    Batt.; killed in action, France, October 26,

    1914; born Knock, Ballyhaunis, Co. Mayo.


    MURTAGH, PATRICK. Reg. No. 219973.

    Rank, Driver, Royal Field Artillery (formerly

    Royal Army Service Corps); killed in

    action, France, February 18, 1918; born

    Castlebar, Co. Mayo.


    MURTAGH, ROBERT. Reg. No. 8118.

    Rank, Lance-Corporal, Connaught Rangers,

    1st Batt.; killed in action, Mesopotamia,

    January 21, 1916; born Dublin.



  • January 14, 2018 16:39:29 Thomas A. Lingner

    Regimental History Extract


     Left column, page 149 

    BATTLE OF THE ANCRE, NOVEMBER 14th  

    battalion was reorganized about 2 a.m. on November 14th,

    and at 6 a.m. the Fusiliers attacked once more. It was 

    at this point that the 7th Battalion came into contact

    with the 13th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, who attacked

    between the 13th Rifle Brigade and the 13th King's Royal

    Rifle Corps. The 13th moved off a little too eagerly and

    suffered some casualties from our own barrage. They 

    withdrew 50 yards and then resumed the advance under

    a harassing machine gun fire from the Beaucourt village.

    A strong point on the left flank resisted with great determination,

    and the 13th Rifle Brigade were to the rear of

    the 13th Royal Fusiliers when the first objective was

    taken. Meanwhile, Captain Goddard, with the 7th, had

    amalgamated the battalion's two waves, and after one

    and a half hours' shelling of the final objective, advanced

    and took it without much opposition. He had turned

    to the right and with elements of the 13th Battalion, the

    13th K.R.R.C., and the H.A.C., consolidated the right

    flank on the bank of the Ancre, south-east of Beaucourt,

    which had fallen a little earlier to the charge of Freyberg's 

    force.

      Up to this point the position on the left of the 13th 

    Battalion still caused trouble. Most of the casualties

    suffered by the 7th in their advance to the final objective

    had come from this quarter, and the 13th remained on

    the first line captured. But the 10th Battalion, who, like

    the 13th, belonged to the 111th Brigade, had had the

    pleasant experience of co-operating with a tank in the 

    reduction of the German redoubt which had held up the

    centre of the 63rd Division. The mere appearance of the

    tank seems to have been sufficient, and without firing a 

    shot the 10th Battalion took 270 German prisoners,* and

    three machine guns. They also liberated 60 British

    prisoners who had been well treated, but were naturally 

    glad to get back to their own army. The 7th Battalion

    passed from this area and the 13th did not figure in again in 

    the battle. The former had attacked 22 officers and

     note at bottom of page 

    *Eight hundred prisoners in all were taken from this redoubt.

     right column, page 150 

    ROYAL FUSILIERS IN THE GREAT WAR


    629 other ranks strong. They lost 13 officers and 331

    other ranks, more than half the total strength. The 

    casualties of the 13th were 8 officers (including Lieut.-

    Colonel Ardagh, wounded) and 130 other ranks. But the 

    victory was complete. It was a great blow to German

    prestige, and it made an important improvement in the 

    British positions.

    * * * *

    There were still some local operations in this area before

    the battle died down and a final line could be organised

    for winter. The 10th Battalion took a prominent part

    in these attempts to round off the gains of the first three

    days. Part of the final line still remained in German

    hands. The 13th Battalion, on the morning of the 14th,

    had been held up by opposition on its left, and patrols 

    sent out failed even to locate the objective. Muck Trench,

    as it was called, continued to lure the 111th Brigade, and

    the 10th Battalion attacked at dawn on November 16th

    with the object of capturing it. They were beaten back

    by intense machine gun fire. In the afternoon two

    bombing parties attempted to get forward and actually

    reached the trench, but they were promptly attacked by

    superior forces and compelled to retire. Lieutenant R.

    Stephenson was killed on this occasion. The German 

    barrage prevented a third attempt, but Second Lieutenant

    Ground succeeded in establishing two posts in the trench

    on the left before dusk, and two others were established

    during the night by Second Lieutenant Bainbridge.

    These posts were reinforced and organized. But during 

    the night of the 17th the machine gun team in the trench

    was shelled and almost wiped out. At 6.10 a.m. on the

    18th the battalion attacked on the right of the 32nd

    Division and stormed all its objectives but one. Unfortunately

    these gains had to abandoned owing to the

    failure of the right of the 32nd Division. On November 

    19th the 10th delivered yet another attack. Two patrols,

    under Second Lieutenants Bainbridge and Heywood,

    respectively, reached the objective, but were compelled

     end of first clipping 

     second clipping, page 151 

    END OF THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME

    to withdraw. During the night the battalion was relieved

    after an extraordinary exhibition of tenacity of purpose.

      The most important and most spectacular achievement

    of the Fusiliers in the battle of Ancre was the capture

    of the redoubt which had almost brought the advance to 

    a standstill. But it was the least difficult task, and the 

    10th, who accomplished it, did more distinguished service

    in the following days, though their repeated attacks merely

    served to secure a few points of tactical importance.



  • January 14, 2018 16:36:51 Thomas A. Lingner

    Regimental History Extract


     Left column, page 149 

    BATTLE OF THE ANCRE, NOVEMBER 14th  

    battalion was reorganized about 2 a.m. on November 14th,

    and at 6 a.m. the Fusiliers attacked once more. It was 

    at this point that the 7th Battalion came into contact

    with the 13th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, who attacked

    between the 13th Rifle Brigade and the 13th King's Royal

    Rifle Corps. The 13th moved off a little too eagerly and

    suffered some casualties from our own barrage. They 

    withdrew 50 yards and then resumed the advance under

    a harassing machine gun fire from the Beaucourt village.

    A strong point on the left flank resisted with great determination,

    and the 13th Rifle Brigade were to the rear of

    the 13th Royal Fusiliers when the first objective was

    taken. Meanwhile, Captain Goddard, with the 7th, had

    amalgamated the battalion's two waves, and after one

    and a half hours' shelling of the final objective, advanced

    and took it without much opposition. He had turned

    to the right and with elements of the 13th Battalion, the

    13th K.R.R.C., and the H.A.C., consolidated the right

    flank on the bank of the Ancre, south-east of Beaucourt,

    which had fallen a little earlier to the charge of Freyberg's 

    force.

      Up to this point the position on the left of the 13th 

    Battalion still caused trouble. Most of the casualties

    suffered by the 7th in their advance to the final objective

    had come from this quarter, and the 13th remained on

    the first line captured. But the 10th Battalion, who, like

    the 13th, belonged to the 111th Brigade, had had the

    pleasant experience of co-operating with a tank in the 

    reduction of the German redoubt which had held up the

    centre of the 63rd Division. The mere appearance of the

    tank seems to have been sufficient, and without firing a 

    shot the 10th Battalion took 270 German prisoners,* and

    three machine guns. They also liberated 60 British

    prisoners who had been well treated, but were naturally 

    glad to get back to their own army. The 7th Battalion

    passed from this area and the 13th did not figure in again in 

    the battle. The former had attacked 22 officers and

     note at bottom of page 

    *Eight hundred prisoners in all were taken from this redoubt.

     right column, page 150 

    ROYAL FUSILIERS IN THE GREAT WAR


    629 other ranks strong. They lost 13 officers and 331

    other ranks, more than half the total strength. The 

    casualties of the 13th were 8 officers (including Lieut.-

    Colonel Ardagh, wounded) and 130 other ranks. But the 

    victory was complete. It was a great blow to German

    prestige, and it made an important improvement in the 

    British positions.

    * * * *

    There were still some local operations in this area before

    the battle died down and a final line could be organised

    for winter. The 10th Battalion took a prominent part

    in these attempts to round off the gains of the first three

    days. Part of the final line still remained in German

    hands. The 13th Battalion, on the morning of the 14th,

    had been held up by opposition on its left, and patrols 

    sent out failed even to locate the objective. Muck Trench,

    as it was called, continued to lure the 111th Brigade, and

    the 10th Battalion attacked at dawn on November 16th

    with the object of capturing it. They were beaten back

    by intense machine gun fire. In the afternoon two

    bombing parties attempted to get forward and actually

    reached the trench, but they were promptly attacked by

    superior forces and compelled to retire. Lieutenant R.

    Stephenson was killed on this occasion. The German 

    barrage prevented a third attempt, but Second Lieutenant

    Ground succeeded in establishing two posts in the trench

    on the left before dusk, and two others were established

    during the night by Second Lieutenant Bainbridge.

    These posts were reinforced and organized. But during 

    the night of the 17th the machine gun team in the trench

    was shelled and almost wiped out. At 6.10 a.m. on the

    18th the battalion attacked on the right of the 32nd

    Division and stormed all its objectives but one. Unfortunately

    these gains had to abandoned owing to the

    failure of the right of the 32nd Division. On November 

    19th the 10th delivered yet another attack. Two patrols,

    under Second Lieutenants Bainbridge and Heywood,

    respectively, reached the objective, but were compelled



  • January 14, 2018 16:34:03 Thomas A. Lingner

    Regimental History Extract


     Left column, page 149 

    BATTLE OF THE ANCRE, NOVEMBER 14th  

    battalion was reorganized about 2 a.m. on November 14th,

    and at 6 a.m. the Fusiliers attacked once more. It was 

    at this point that the 7th Battalion came into contact

    with the 13th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, who attacked

    between the 13th Rifle Brigade and the 13th King's Royal

    Rifle Corps. The 13th moved off a little too eagerly and

    suffered some casualties from our own barrage. They 

    withdrew 50 yards and then resumed the advance under

    a harassing machine gun fire from the Beaucourt village.

    A strong point on the left flank resisted with great determination,

    and the 13th Rifle Brigade were to the rear of

    the 13th Royal Fusiliers when the first objective was

    taken. Meanwhile, Captain Goddard, with the 7th, had

    amalgamated the battalion's two waves, and after one

    and a half hours' shelling of the final objective, advanced

    and took it without much opposition. He had turned

    to the right and with elements of the 13th Battalion, the

    13th K.R.R.C., and the H.A.C., consolidated the right

    flank on the bank of the Ancre, south-east of Beaucourt,

    which had fallen a little earlier to the charge of Freyberg's 

    force.

      Up to this point the position on the left of the 13th 

    Battalion still caused trouble. Most of the casualties

    suffered by the 7th in their advance to the final objective

    had come from this quarter, and the 13th remained on

    the first line captured. But the 10th Battalion, who, like

    the 13th, belonged to the 111th Brigade, had had the

    pleasant experience of co-operating with a tank in the 

    reduction of the German redoubt which had held up the

    centre of the 63rd Division. The mere appearance of the

    tank seems to have been sufficient, and without firing a 

    shot the 10th Battalion took 270 German prisoners,* and

    three machine guns. They also liberated 60 British

    prisoners who had been well treated, but were naturally 

    glad to get back to their own army. The 7th Battalion

    passed from this area and the 13th did not figure in again in 

    the battle. The former had attacked 22 officers and

     note at bottom of page 

    *Eight hundred prisoners in all were taken from this redoubt.

     right column, page 150 

    ROYAL FUSILIERS IN THE GREAT WAR


    629 other ranks strong. They lost 13 officers and 331

    other ranks, more than half the total strength. The 

    casualties of the 13th were 8 officers (including Lieut.-

    Colonel Ardagh, wounded) and 130 other ranks. But the 

    victory was complete. It was a great blow to German

    prestige, and it made an important improvement in the 

    British positions.

    * * * *

    There were still some local operations in this area before

    the battle died down and a final line could be organised

    for winter. The 10th Battalion took a prominent part

    in these attempts to round off the gains of the first three

    days. Part of the final line still remained in German

    hands. The 13th Battalion, on the morning of the 14th,

    had been held up by opposition on its left, and patrols 

    sent out failed even to locate the objective. Muck Trench,

    as it was called, continued to lure the 111th Brigade, and

    the 10th Battalion attacked at dawn on November 16th

    with the object of capturing it. They were beaten back

    by intense machine gun fire. In the afternoon two

    bombing parties attempted to get forward and actually

    reached the trench, but they were promptly attacked by

    superior forces and compelled to retire. Lieutenant R.

    Stephenson was killed on this occasion. 



  • January 14, 2018 16:27:23 Thomas A. Lingner

    Left page

    Regimental History Extract


    BATTLE OF THE ANCRE, NOVEMBER 14th  

    battalion was reorganized about 2 a.m. on November 14th,

    and at 6 a.m. the Fusiliers attacked once more. It was 

    at this point that the 7th Battalion came into contact

    with the 13th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, who attacked

    between the 13th Rifle Brigade and the 13th King's Royal

    Rifle Corps. The 13th moved off a little too eagerly and

    suffered some casualties from our own barrage. They 

    withdrew 50 yards and then resumed the advance under

    a harassing machine gun fire from the Beaucourt village.

    A strong point on the left flank resisted with great determination,

    and the 13th Rifle Brigade were to the rear of

    the 13th Royal Fusiliers when the first objective was

    taken. Meanwhile, Captain Goddard, with the 7th, had

    amalgamated the battalion's two waves, and after one

    and a half hours' shelling of the final objective, advanced

    and took it without much opposition. He had turned

    to the right and with elements of the 13th Battalion, the

    13th K.R.R.C., and the H.A.C., consolidated the right

    flank on the bank of the Ancre, south-east of Beaucourt,

    which had fallen a little earlier to the charge of Freyberg's 

    force.

      Up to this point the position on the left of the 13th 

    Battalion still caused trouble. Most of the casualties

    suffered by the 7th in their advance to the final objective

    had come from this quarter, and the 13th remained on

    the first line captured. But the 10th Battalion, who, like

    the 13th, belonged to the 111th Brigade, had had the

    pleasant experience of co-operating with a tank in the 

    reduction of the German redoubt which had held up the

    centre of the 63rd Division. The mere appearance of the

    tank seems to have been sufficient, and without firing a 

    shot the 10th Battalion took 270 German prisoners,* and

    three machine guns. 


  • January 14, 2018 16:25:02 Thomas A. Lingner

    Left page

    Regimental History Extract


    BATTLE OF THE ANCRE, NOVEMBER 14th  

    battalion was reorganized about 2 a.m. on November 14th,

    and at 6 a.m. the Fusiliers attacked once more. It was 

    at this point that the 7th Battalion came into contact

    with the 13th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, who attacked

    between the 13th Rifle Brigade and the 13th King's Royal

    Rifle Corps. The 13th moved off a little too eagerly and

    suffered some casualties from our own barrage. They 

    withdrew 50 yards and then resumed the advance under

    a harassing machine gun fire from the Beaucourt village.

    A strong point on the left flank resisted with great determination,

    and the 13th Rifle Brigade were to the rear of

    the 13th Royal Fusiliers when the first objective was

    taken. Meanwhile, Captain Goddard, with the 7th, had

    amalgamated the battalion's two waves, and after one

    and a half hours' shelling of the final objective, advanced

    and took it without much opposition. He had turned

    to the right and with elements of the 13th Battalion, the

    13th K.R.R.C., and the H.A.C., consolidated the right

    flank on the bank of the Ancre, south-east of Beaucourt,

    which had fallen a little earlier to the charge of Freyberg's 

    force.

      


  • January 14, 2018 16:23:26 Thomas A. Lingner

    Left page

    Regimental History Extract


    BATTLE OF THE ANCRE, NOVEMBER 14th  

    battalion was reorganized about 2 a.m. on November 14th,

    and at 6 a.m. the Fusiliers attacked once more. It was 

    at this point that the 7th Battalion came into contact

    with the 13th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, who attacked

    between the 13th Rifle Brigade and the 13th King's Royal

    Rifle Corps. The 13th moved off a little too eagerly and

    suffered some casualties from our own barrage. They 

    withdrew 50 yards and then resumed the advance under

    a harassing machine gun fire from the Beaucourt village.

    A strong point on the left flank resisted with great determination,

    and the 13th Rifle Brigade were to the rear of

    the 13th Royal Fusiliers when the first objective was

    taken.


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    ID
    3798 / 46806
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Maine Delaney
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


    • English

    • Western Front




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