Miss Beauchamp's War in Salonika, item 31

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that all Salonica had gone, this was

succeeded by a general apathy in 

which nobody seemed to care about 

anything.

  By then it was a normal sight to

see a new street afire and the refugees,

who were lying everywhere on 

their goods and chattels near the

port, looked on with apparently unheeding

eyes.

  By nine the fire after running in

a long straight line east turned 

south in obedience to the wind and

leaped the Rue Egnatia in its stride,

the vaulted wooden roof of the

bazaar acting as a perfect conductor

down into the commercial quarter.

From then onwards to eleven I 

observed the fire a number of times

from the flat roof, watching its 

progress with a very personal

interest, and one looked into several

square miles of flame in which here 

and there white minarets stood out

with striking effect, and extraordinary

to relate all of them came through

the furnace unscathed except for the

loss of their metal tops.

  By ten o'clock I had decided to

become a refugee myself. A little

while after the flat roof was ablaze

and by eleven all the streets running

near and parallel to the water's edge

were repeating the same scene (on a 

larger scale) which had been witnessed

a few hours before away up the

hill.

  By midnight everybody had realised

that the whole water front was

doomed and then the flames, executing

a quick flank movement just

short of the White Tower, cut into 

the water front so that the only

exit from the town was towards the

Monastir Road.

  Long before this time better methods

had got to work, hoses were 

run out from navy lighters near the 

quay wall and the British Army was

doing good work with two modern fire

engines, but it was all merely like

shaking one's fist at the fire. From 

now onwards every effort was directed

towards helping and saving 

the refugees by the aid of

the admirable Allied transport

service. Lorries and motor cars

were brought in apparently

unlimited quantities. I saw scores and

scores of motor lorries loaded up with

men, women, children, babies and

their poor effects - those that had

not been thrown away - and it was

heartening to see the way in which

officers and men behaved to this multitude

of distracted or numbed people

of whose language they understood

not a word. "Come on, mother we'll

hand the ids up afterwards," I remember

one man saying to a wrinkled

dame in a comic opera costume, and

that sort of homely little touch was 

being repeated a dozen times a minute.

  At this time it seemed as though

the only exit from the town would be

cut off and that the sea would be the 

only escape for great numbers of the

multitude, and on the one crowded 

line of communication there were

scenes of great anxiety. Here again

the Navy came into service, all lighters 

possible were run into the 

quay wall and the crowds and their 

baggage were conducted or carried

on board, it being often a case of old 

folks as well as children in 

arms. One cannot imagine greater

solicitude than our men displayed,

and everybody worked like niggers

evacuating the homeless crowds by 

road and sea.

  And with the front now beginning 

to blaze and apparently the whole 

city one mass of flame one cannot imagine

a more grim and fantastic sight

than that of the escaping multitude

who awoke from their dumb inertia

as they saw some chance of help

and climbed into the motor lorries

amid a babel of cries and counter-cries,

with here and there a distracted

mother raising her voice in a hoarse

scream for a missing infant. By the

time the front was blazing, in one

great cliff of orange and white light,

practically all the people had been 

got out of harm's way.

  Then we stood there and watched

the familiar buildings which, after

a year or two year's residence we

know as we know home disappear

one by one. Venizelos street was an

arcade of flame with hops crashing

down and clouds of fire shooting up.

On the front the rebuilt Hotel Splendide

was a melancholy glory of flame

and ruin with its spacious new

restaurant and tea rooms gone after

a few month's life. But the strangest

sight of all was the Place de la

Liberte, the centre of Salonica life

with its crowded café terraces and

where the Allied military bands

played three days a week. At about

2.30 a.m. its destruction, began, the 

famous Café Floca became a burst of

red flames, and brickwork and tiles

came rattling down. It was a sad sight

to see the beginning of the destruction 

of the Cercle des Etrangers

the one real club - and

a good one - founded some 

forty years ago by a British consul

and the scene of innumerable meetings

and friendships among British 

officers here down from the 

front for a few days.

  And at something after four, sated

with reeling raging destruction, I

turned from the blazing front and

began to think of seeking a lodging

for the night somewhere in the

mountain up on the Monastir

Street along which the refugee

caravan was rumbling.

At least two extraordinary fire 

freaks have so far come under my 

notice. Stein's Oriental Stores, on

the corner of Place de la Liberté,

escaped without the slightest damage

not even a window being broken. It 

is faced with marble, which perhaps

accounts for its immunity, and it is

indeed ironical that the one shop

which has escaped in all the region

should be one which is on the list as

having enemy connections, and

therefore is not to be traded with by

the Allied troops.

  And amid a world of complete 

ruin with buildings of fantastic

shapes all around it the office of the

Balkan News, the newspaper published

here for the British Army, has so 

far escaped completely and seems

likely to do so in spite of fires which 

are still burning in many quarters

of the city.

  The Balkan News was printing until

nearly eleven o'clock but then found

it impossible to get papers away. At

present of course all motor power is

cut off but it is expected to start

publication again very soon.

  Yesterday (Monday) a Boche aeroplane

came over to see what damage

had been done. It was briskly shelled 

by the Allied guns but must have gone

away with a very satisfying report to

make. 

  Everything possible is now being 

done for the many thousands of 

refugees who at present are camped

on the outskirts of the city.

  H. C. OWEN

----------------------

No Papers

  An official note says: Owing

to a fire which broke out in 

Salonica on Saturday night no

local papers have been able to

appear. No military damage 

has been caused by this fire,

but considerable civilian property 

has been destroyed.

------------------------

Stand of the Russian Armies

  London Monday: The Observer,

discussing the situation in 

the Russian armies, says that the 

7th and 11th Russian armies

rallied on the river Zbruch, and 

the Germans are now being 

held up on the Galician frontier. 

  Between the Doiester and

the Pruth the Austrians are

being turned back from Bassarabia.


Saturday's British Officials.

  Land forces: - Early 

this morning the enemy delivered 

another counter-attack 

against our recently captured 

positions immediately northwest 

of Lens. His troops were 

again completely repulsed. After 

sharp fighting we secured 

a few prisoners. There has been 

considerable hostile artillery

activity during the night in 

this neighborhood and also 

northeast of Ypres. 

  Later : In addition to the 

hostile attacks north west of 

Lens reported in this morning's 

communiqué, the enemy made 

two other counter-attacks early 

this morning on this front;  

one east of Loos and the other 

in the neighborhood of Bois

Hugo. In the first case, the 

enemy's attacking troops were 

caught by our barrage and 

machine - gun fire at short 

range and driven back in 

disorder after heavy losses. In 

the second attack also the 

enemy's infantry though supported 

by flammenwerfer failed 

to reach our trenches. On the 

Ypres battle front hostile artillery

has been quieter.

  Sea forces: The admiral 

announces that some 

of our light naval forces scouting

in the German Bight on 

the 16th August (Thursday)

sighted an enemy destroyer at 

9.45 a. m. Fire was opened,

and the enemy destroyer was 

chased. She was seen to be 

repeatedly hit and afire, but 

escaped through the mist over

a minefield.

  Enemy mine-sweepers were 

sighted shortly after sighting 

the destroyer and heavy fire

opened upon them. At least 

two of the mine-sweepers were 

seen to be severely damaged,

but as in the case of 

the destroyer, our ships were

unable to follow them owing

to the proximity of mine-fields.

  During the engagements our 

vessels were attacked by a

submarine and after the action

a second submarine attacked,

in both cases without result.

Our vessels suffered no damage

whatever. 

  Air Forces: - The R. N. 

A. S. raided Thourout railway

station and junction during 

the night of Thursday. It 

is thought that an ammunition

dump was hit and the railway

damaged. Many tons of bombs 

were dropped.

  On the Western front, in 

air fighting 12 German aeroplanes

were brought down and 

8 driven out of control.

12 of our machines are missing.

------

Saturday's French Official:

  In Belgium our troops continued

to make progress north of

the Bixschoote-Langemarckroad

and carried an enemy strong 

point east of the Steenbeke.

  During the day of the 17th

and the night 111 aeroplanes

took part in various flights in

the course of which 13,000

kilograms of projectiles were

dropped.

Sunday's British Officials:

  LAND FORCES. We carried

out a successful local operation 

early this morning south east

of Epeby. We captured the

German trenches in the neighborhood

of Gillemont farm

and took several prisoners. 

Last night our raiding parties

entered the enemy's positions 

south west of Havrincourt and

returned with prisoners after 

inflicting heavy casualties. 

  Later: Successful minor 

operations were carried out 

early this morning near Ypres

and Poelcapelle. Our line was

advanced to a depth of about

500 yards on a front of (?) a

mile. All our objectives which

included a series of strongly 

fortified farms were captured

at slight loss. The enemy's 

losses were considerable. 

  The prisoners captured by 

the Allies on Thursday last 

north east of Ypres number

2114, including 35 officers. 

  AIR FORCES: Three German 

aeroplanes were brought 

down, 4 others were driven 

down, 8 of ours are missing.

  On the night of Thursday 

enemy aircraft bombed British 

C.C.S's. 10 wounded German 

prisoners were killed and 9 

wounded German prisoners 

were again wounded by bombs.

 --

  The French Sunday official 

reports nothing of importance 

except that 17 enemy machines

were brought down, 11

being destroyed, and that 

important air raids on Belgium 

were carried out. 

--------------------

Russian Offensive Expected

  London Monday. - The Sunday 

Times Petrograd correspondent 

says, that it is confidently 

believed that before long 

the German advance against 

Russia will be arrested, and 

as soon as the work of organization 

is complete, a powerful 

offensive will be directed 

against the Germans. The 

Government is secure at 

last, and there is a real 

fighting spirit in the army.

  On the northern section the

front line is secure. The correspondent 

recently visited several 

units of the army and 

fleet and found everywhere a 

great improvement in discipline 

and better relations between 

officers and men than he ever 

anticipated. 

  It is now generally agreed 

in Russia that the war must 

be continued until a force is 

formed which shall not only 

restore freedom to all nationalities 

but shall end for ever 

all military despotism that 

threatens the peace of the world. 

The Russian delegates will, 

therefore, not go to Stockholm 

with the idea of preparing the 

way for an indefinite peace but 

for a peace that will ensure the

aims which the Russian people 

desires and which the Entente 

is agreed upon. 


PRINTED BY THE SURVEY COMPANY, R.E., B.S.F. No. 765 22-8-17

Transcription saved

that all Salonica had gone, this was

succeeded by a general apathy in 

which nobody seemed to care about 

anything.

  By then it was a normal sight to

see a new street afire and the refugees,

who were lying everywhere on 

their goods and chattels near the

port, looked on with apparently unheeding

eyes.

  By nine the fire after running in

a long straight line east turned 

south in obedience to the wind and

leaped the Rue Egnatia in its stride,

the vaulted wooden roof of the

bazaar acting as a perfect conductor

down into the commercial quarter.

From then onwards to eleven I 

observed the fire a number of times

from the flat roof, watching its 

progress with a very personal

interest, and one looked into several

square miles of flame in which here 

and there white minarets stood out

with striking effect, and extraordinary

to relate all of them came through

the furnace unscathed except for the

loss of their metal tops.

  By ten o'clock I had decided to

become a refugee myself. A little

while after the flat roof was ablaze

and by eleven all the streets running

near and parallel to the water's edge

were repeating the same scene (on a 

larger scale) which had been witnessed

a few hours before away up the

hill.

  By midnight everybody had realised

that the whole water front was

doomed and then the flames, executing

a quick flank movement just

short of the White Tower, cut into 

the water front so that the only

exit from the town was towards the

Monastir Road.

  Long before this time better methods

had got to work, hoses were 

run out from navy lighters near the 

quay wall and the British Army was

doing good work with two modern fire

engines, but it was all merely like

shaking one's fist at the fire. From 

now onwards every effort was directed

towards helping and saving 

the refugees by the aid of

the admirable Allied transport

service. Lorries and motor cars

were brought in apparently

unlimited quantities. I saw scores and

scores of motor lorries loaded up with

men, women, children, babies and

their poor effects - those that had

not been thrown away - and it was

heartening to see the way in which

officers and men behaved to this multitude

of distracted or numbed people

of whose language they understood

not a word. "Come on, mother we'll

hand the ids up afterwards," I remember

one man saying to a wrinkled

dame in a comic opera costume, and

that sort of homely little touch was 

being repeated a dozen times a minute.

  At this time it seemed as though

the only exit from the town would be

cut off and that the sea would be the 

only escape for great numbers of the

multitude, and on the one crowded 

line of communication there were

scenes of great anxiety. Here again

the Navy came into service, all lighters 

possible were run into the 

quay wall and the crowds and their 

baggage were conducted or carried

on board, it being often a case of old 

folks as well as children in 

arms. One cannot imagine greater

solicitude than our men displayed,

and everybody worked like niggers

evacuating the homeless crowds by 

road and sea.

  And with the front now beginning 

to blaze and apparently the whole 

city one mass of flame one cannot imagine

a more grim and fantastic sight

than that of the escaping multitude

who awoke from their dumb inertia

as they saw some chance of help

and climbed into the motor lorries

amid a babel of cries and counter-cries,

with here and there a distracted

mother raising her voice in a hoarse

scream for a missing infant. By the

time the front was blazing, in one

great cliff of orange and white light,

practically all the people had been 

got out of harm's way.

  Then we stood there and watched

the familiar buildings which, after

a year or two year's residence we

know as we know home disappear

one by one. Venizelos street was an

arcade of flame with hops crashing

down and clouds of fire shooting up.

On the front the rebuilt Hotel Splendide

was a melancholy glory of flame

and ruin with its spacious new

restaurant and tea rooms gone after

a few month's life. But the strangest

sight of all was the Place de la

Liberte, the centre of Salonica life

with its crowded café terraces and

where the Allied military bands

played three days a week. At about

2.30 a.m. its destruction, began, the 

famous Café Floca became a burst of

red flames, and brickwork and tiles

came rattling down. It was a sad sight

to see the beginning of the destruction 

of the Cercle des Etrangers

the one real club - and

a good one - founded some 

forty years ago by a British consul

and the scene of innumerable meetings

and friendships among British 

officers here down from the 

front for a few days.

  And at something after four, sated

with reeling raging destruction, I

turned from the blazing front and

began to think of seeking a lodging

for the night somewhere in the

mountain up on the Monastir

Street along which the refugee

caravan was rumbling.

At least two extraordinary fire 

freaks have so far come under my 

notice. Stein's Oriental Stores, on

the corner of Place de la Liberté,

escaped without the slightest damage

not even a window being broken. It 

is faced with marble, which perhaps

accounts for its immunity, and it is

indeed ironical that the one shop

which has escaped in all the region

should be one which is on the list as

having enemy connections, and

therefore is not to be traded with by

the Allied troops.

  And amid a world of complete 

ruin with buildings of fantastic

shapes all around it the office of the

Balkan News, the newspaper published

here for the British Army, has so 

far escaped completely and seems

likely to do so in spite of fires which 

are still burning in many quarters

of the city.

  The Balkan News was printing until

nearly eleven o'clock but then found

it impossible to get papers away. At

present of course all motor power is

cut off but it is expected to start

publication again very soon.

  Yesterday (Monday) a Boche aeroplane

came over to see what damage

had been done. It was briskly shelled 

by the Allied guns but must have gone

away with a very satisfying report to

make. 

  Everything possible is now being 

done for the many thousands of 

refugees who at present are camped

on the outskirts of the city.

  H. C. OWEN

----------------------

No Papers

  An official note says: Owing

to a fire which broke out in 

Salonica on Saturday night no

local papers have been able to

appear. No military damage 

has been caused by this fire,

but considerable civilian property 

has been destroyed.

------------------------

Stand of the Russian Armies

  London Monday: The Observer,

discussing the situation in 

the Russian armies, says that the 

7th and 11th Russian armies

rallied on the river Zbruch, and 

the Germans are now being 

held up on the Galician frontier. 

  Between the Doiester and

the Pruth the Austrians are

being turned back from Bassarabia.


Saturday's British Officials.

  Land forces: - Early 

this morning the enemy delivered 

another counter-attack 

against our recently captured 

positions immediately northwest 

of Lens. His troops were 

again completely repulsed. After 

sharp fighting we secured 

a few prisoners. There has been 

considerable hostile artillery

activity during the night in 

this neighborhood and also 

northeast of Ypres. 

  Later : In addition to the 

hostile attacks north west of 

Lens reported in this morning's 

communiqué, the enemy made 

two other counter-attacks early 

this morning on this front;  

one east of Loos and the other 

in the neighborhood of Bois

Hugo. In the first case, the 

enemy's attacking troops were 

caught by our barrage and 

machine - gun fire at short 

range and driven back in 

disorder after heavy losses. In 

the second attack also the 

enemy's infantry though supported 

by flammenwerfer failed 

to reach our trenches. On the 

Ypres battle front hostile artillery

has been quieter.

  Sea forces: The admiral 

announces that some 

of our light naval forces scouting

in the German Bight on 

the 16th August (Thursday)

sighted an enemy destroyer at 

9.45 a. m. Fire was opened,

and the enemy destroyer was 

chased. She was seen to be 

repeatedly hit and afire, but 

escaped through the mist over

a minefield.

  Enemy mine-sweepers were 

sighted shortly after sighting 

the destroyer and heavy fire

opened upon them. At least 

two of the mine-sweepers were 

seen to be severely damaged,

but as in the case of 

the destroyer, our ships were

unable to follow them owing

to the proximity of mine-fields.

  During the engagements our 

vessels were attacked by a

submarine and after the action

a second submarine attacked,

in both cases without result.

Our vessels suffered no damage

whatever. 

  Air Forces: - The R. N. 

A. S. raided Thourout railway

station and junction during 

the night of Thursday. It 

is thought that an ammunition

dump was hit and the railway

damaged. Many tons of bombs 

were dropped.

  On the Western front, in 

air fighting 12 German aeroplanes

were brought down and 

8 driven out of control.

12 of our machines are missing.

------

Saturday's French Official:

  In Belgium our troops continued

to make progress north of

the Bixschoote-Langemarckroad

and carried an enemy strong 

point east of the Steenbeke.

  During the day of the 17th

and the night 111 aeroplanes

took part in various flights in

the course of which 13,000

kilograms of projectiles were

dropped.

Sunday's British Officials:

  LAND FORCES. We carried

out a successful local operation 

early this morning south east

of Epeby. We captured the

German trenches in the neighborhood

of Gillemont farm

and took several prisoners. 

Last night our raiding parties

entered the enemy's positions 

south west of Havrincourt and

returned with prisoners after 

inflicting heavy casualties. 

  Later: Successful minor 

operations were carried out 

early this morning near Ypres

and Poelcapelle. Our line was

advanced to a depth of about

500 yards on a front of (?) a

mile. All our objectives which

included a series of strongly 

fortified farms were captured

at slight loss. The enemy's 

losses were considerable. 

  The prisoners captured by 

the Allies on Thursday last 

north east of Ypres number

2114, including 35 officers. 

  AIR FORCES: Three German 

aeroplanes were brought 

down, 4 others were driven 

down, 8 of ours are missing.

  On the night of Thursday 

enemy aircraft bombed British 

C.C.S's. 10 wounded German 

prisoners were killed and 9 

wounded German prisoners 

were again wounded by bombs.

 --

  The French Sunday official 

reports nothing of importance 

except that 17 enemy machines

were brought down, 11

being destroyed, and that 

important air raids on Belgium 

were carried out. 

--------------------

Russian Offensive Expected

  London Monday. - The Sunday 

Times Petrograd correspondent 

says, that it is confidently 

believed that before long 

the German advance against 

Russia will be arrested, and 

as soon as the work of organization 

is complete, a powerful 

offensive will be directed 

against the Germans. The 

Government is secure at 

last, and there is a real 

fighting spirit in the army.

  On the northern section the

front line is secure. The correspondent 

recently visited several 

units of the army and 

fleet and found everywhere a 

great improvement in discipline 

and better relations between 

officers and men than he ever 

anticipated. 

  It is now generally agreed 

in Russia that the war must 

be continued until a force is 

formed which shall not only 

restore freedom to all nationalities 

but shall end for ever 

all military despotism that 

threatens the peace of the world. 

The Russian delegates will, 

therefore, not go to Stockholm 

with the idea of preparing the 

way for an indefinite peace but 

for a peace that will ensure the

aims which the Russian people 

desires and which the Entente 

is agreed upon. 


PRINTED BY THE SURVEY COMPANY, R.E., B.S.F. No. 765 22-8-17


Transcription history
  • August 2, 2019 12:31:56 Thomas A. Lingner

    that all Salonica had gone, this was

    succeeded by a general apathy in 

    which nobody seemed to care about 

    anything.

      By then it was a normal sight to

    see a new street afire and the refugees,

    who were lying everywhere on 

    their goods and chattels near the

    port, looked on with apparently unheeding

    eyes.

      By nine the fire after running in

    a long straight line east turned 

    south in obedience to the wind and

    leaped the Rue Egnatia in its stride,

    the vaulted wooden roof of the

    bazaar acting as a perfect conductor

    down into the commercial quarter.

    From then onwards to eleven I 

    observed the fire a number of times

    from the flat roof, watching its 

    progress with a very personal

    interest, and one looked into several

    square miles of flame in which here 

    and there white minarets stood out

    with striking effect, and extraordinary

    to relate all of them came through

    the furnace unscathed except for the

    loss of their metal tops.

      By ten o'clock I had decided to

    become a refugee myself. A little

    while after the flat roof was ablaze

    and by eleven all the streets running

    near and parallel to the water's edge

    were repeating the same scene (on a 

    larger scale) which had been witnessed

    a few hours before away up the

    hill.

      By midnight everybody had realised

    that the whole water front was

    doomed and then the flames, executing

    a quick flank movement just

    short of the White Tower, cut into 

    the water front so that the only

    exit from the town was towards the

    Monastir Road.

      Long before this time better methods

    had got to work, hoses were 

    run out from navy lighters near the 

    quay wall and the British Army was

    doing good work with two modern fire

    engines, but it was all merely like

    shaking one's fist at the fire. From 

    now onwards every effort was directed

    towards helping and saving 

    the refugees by the aid of

    the admirable Allied transport

    service. Lorries and motor cars

    were brought in apparently

    unlimited quantities. I saw scores and

    scores of motor lorries loaded up with

    men, women, children, babies and

    their poor effects - those that had

    not been thrown away - and it was

    heartening to see the way in which

    officers and men behaved to this multitude

    of distracted or numbed people

    of whose language they understood

    not a word. "Come on, mother we'll

    hand the ids up afterwards," I remember

    one man saying to a wrinkled

    dame in a comic opera costume, and

    that sort of homely little touch was 

    being repeated a dozen times a minute.

      At this time it seemed as though

    the only exit from the town would be

    cut off and that the sea would be the 

    only escape for great numbers of the

    multitude, and on the one crowded 

    line of communication there were

    scenes of great anxiety. Here again

    the Navy came into service, all lighters 

    possible were run into the 

    quay wall and the crowds and their 

    baggage were conducted or carried

    on board, it being often a case of old 

    folks as well as children in 

    arms. One cannot imagine greater

    solicitude than our men displayed,

    and everybody worked like niggers

    evacuating the homeless crowds by 

    road and sea.

      And with the front now beginning 

    to blaze and apparently the whole 

    city one mass of flame one cannot imagine

    a more grim and fantastic sight

    than that of the escaping multitude

    who awoke from their dumb inertia

    as they saw some chance of help

    and climbed into the motor lorries

    amid a babel of cries and counter-cries,

    with here and there a distracted

    mother raising her voice in a hoarse

    scream for a missing infant. By the

    time the front was blazing, in one

    great cliff of orange and white light,

    practically all the people had been 

    got out of harm's way.

      Then we stood there and watched

    the familiar buildings which, after

    a year or two year's residence we

    know as we know home disappear

    one by one. Venizelos street was an

    arcade of flame with hops crashing

    down and clouds of fire shooting up.

    On the front the rebuilt Hotel Splendide

    was a melancholy glory of flame

    and ruin with its spacious new

    restaurant and tea rooms gone after

    a few month's life. But the strangest

    sight of all was the Place de la

    Liberte, the centre of Salonica life

    with its crowded café terraces and

    where the Allied military bands

    played three days a week. At about

    2.30 a.m. its destruction, began, the 

    famous Café Floca became a burst of

    red flames, and brickwork and tiles

    came rattling down. It was a sad sight

    to see the beginning of the destruction 

    of the Cercle des Etrangers

    the one real club - and

    a good one - founded some 

    forty years ago by a British consul

    and the scene of innumerable meetings

    and friendships among British 

    officers here down from the 

    front for a few days.

      And at something after four, sated

    with reeling raging destruction, I

    turned from the blazing front and

    began to think of seeking a lodging

    for the night somewhere in the

    mountain up on the Monastir

    Street along which the refugee

    caravan was rumbling.

    At least two extraordinary fire 

    freaks have so far come under my 

    notice. Stein's Oriental Stores, on

    the corner of Place de la Liberté,

    escaped without the slightest damage

    not even a window being broken. It 

    is faced with marble, which perhaps

    accounts for its immunity, and it is

    indeed ironical that the one shop

    which has escaped in all the region

    should be one which is on the list as

    having enemy connections, and

    therefore is not to be traded with by

    the Allied troops.

      And amid a world of complete 

    ruin with buildings of fantastic

    shapes all around it the office of the

    Balkan News, the newspaper published

    here for the British Army, has so 

    far escaped completely and seems

    likely to do so in spite of fires which 

    are still burning in many quarters

    of the city.

      The Balkan News was printing until

    nearly eleven o'clock but then found

    it impossible to get papers away. At

    present of course all motor power is

    cut off but it is expected to start

    publication again very soon.

      Yesterday (Monday) a Boche aeroplane

    came over to see what damage

    had been done. It was briskly shelled 

    by the Allied guns but must have gone

    away with a very satisfying report to

    make. 

      Everything possible is now being 

    done for the many thousands of 

    refugees who at present are camped

    on the outskirts of the city.

      H. C. OWEN

    ----------------------

    No Papers

      An official note says: Owing

    to a fire which broke out in 

    Salonica on Saturday night no

    local papers have been able to

    appear. No military damage 

    has been caused by this fire,

    but considerable civilian property 

    has been destroyed.

    ------------------------

    Stand of the Russian Armies

      London Monday: The Observer,

    discussing the situation in 

    the Russian armies, says that the 

    7th and 11th Russian armies

    rallied on the river Zbruch, and 

    the Germans are now being 

    held up on the Galician frontier. 

      Between the Doiester and

    the Pruth the Austrians are

    being turned back from Bassarabia.


    Saturday's British Officials.

      Land forces: - Early 

    this morning the enemy delivered 

    another counter-attack 

    against our recently captured 

    positions immediately northwest 

    of Lens. His troops were 

    again completely repulsed. After 

    sharp fighting we secured 

    a few prisoners. There has been 

    considerable hostile artillery

    activity during the night in 

    this neighborhood and also 

    northeast of Ypres. 

      Later : In addition to the 

    hostile attacks north west of 

    Lens reported in this morning's 

    communiqué, the enemy made 

    two other counter-attacks early 

    this morning on this front;  

    one east of Loos and the other 

    in the neighborhood of Bois

    Hugo. In the first case, the 

    enemy's attacking troops were 

    caught by our barrage and 

    machine - gun fire at short 

    range and driven back in 

    disorder after heavy losses. In 

    the second attack also the 

    enemy's infantry though supported 

    by flammenwerfer failed 

    to reach our trenches. On the 

    Ypres battle front hostile artillery

    has been quieter.

      Sea forces: The admiral 

    announces that some 

    of our light naval forces scouting

    in the German Bight on 

    the 16th August (Thursday)

    sighted an enemy destroyer at 

    9.45 a. m. Fire was opened,

    and the enemy destroyer was 

    chased. She was seen to be 

    repeatedly hit and afire, but 

    escaped through the mist over

    a minefield.

      Enemy mine-sweepers were 

    sighted shortly after sighting 

    the destroyer and heavy fire

    opened upon them. At least 

    two of the mine-sweepers were 

    seen to be severely damaged,

    but as in the case of 

    the destroyer, our ships were

    unable to follow them owing

    to the proximity of mine-fields.

      During the engagements our 

    vessels were attacked by a

    submarine and after the action

    a second submarine attacked,

    in both cases without result.

    Our vessels suffered no damage

    whatever. 

      Air Forces: - The R. N. 

    A. S. raided Thourout railway

    station and junction during 

    the night of Thursday. It 

    is thought that an ammunition

    dump was hit and the railway

    damaged. Many tons of bombs 

    were dropped.

      On the Western front, in 

    air fighting 12 German aeroplanes

    were brought down and 

    8 driven out of control.

    12 of our machines are missing.

    ------

    Saturday's French Official:

      In Belgium our troops continued

    to make progress north of

    the Bixschoote-Langemarckroad

    and carried an enemy strong 

    point east of the Steenbeke.

      During the day of the 17th

    and the night 111 aeroplanes

    took part in various flights in

    the course of which 13,000

    kilograms of projectiles were

    dropped.

    Sunday's British Officials:

      LAND FORCES. We carried

    out a successful local operation 

    early this morning south east

    of Epeby. We captured the

    German trenches in the neighborhood

    of Gillemont farm

    and took several prisoners. 

    Last night our raiding parties

    entered the enemy's positions 

    south west of Havrincourt and

    returned with prisoners after 

    inflicting heavy casualties. 

      Later: Successful minor 

    operations were carried out 

    early this morning near Ypres

    and Poelcapelle. Our line was

    advanced to a depth of about

    500 yards on a front of (?) a

    mile. All our objectives which

    included a series of strongly 

    fortified farms were captured

    at slight loss. The enemy's 

    losses were considerable. 

      The prisoners captured by 

    the Allies on Thursday last 

    north east of Ypres number

    2114, including 35 officers. 

      AIR FORCES: Three German 

    aeroplanes were brought 

    down, 4 others were driven 

    down, 8 of ours are missing.

      On the night of Thursday 

    enemy aircraft bombed British 

    C.C.S's. 10 wounded German 

    prisoners were killed and 9 

    wounded German prisoners 

    were again wounded by bombs.

     --

      The French Sunday official 

    reports nothing of importance 

    except that 17 enemy machines

    were brought down, 11

    being destroyed, and that 

    important air raids on Belgium 

    were carried out. 

    --------------------

    Russian Offensive Expected

      London Monday. - The Sunday 

    Times Petrograd correspondent 

    says, that it is confidently 

    believed that before long 

    the German advance against 

    Russia will be arrested, and 

    as soon as the work of organization 

    is complete, a powerful 

    offensive will be directed 

    against the Germans. The 

    Government is secure at 

    last, and there is a real 

    fighting spirit in the army.

      On the northern section the

    front line is secure. The correspondent 

    recently visited several 

    units of the army and 

    fleet and found everywhere a 

    great improvement in discipline 

    and better relations between 

    officers and men than he ever 

    anticipated. 

      It is now generally agreed 

    in Russia that the war must 

    be continued until a force is 

    formed which shall not only 

    restore freedom to all nationalities 

    but shall end for ever 

    all military despotism that 

    threatens the peace of the world. 

    The Russian delegates will, 

    therefore, not go to Stockholm 

    with the idea of preparing the 

    way for an indefinite peace but 

    for a peace that will ensure the

    aims which the Russian people 

    desires and which the Entente 

    is agreed upon. 


    PRINTED BY THE SURVEY COMPANY, R.E., B.S.F. No. 765 22-8-17

  • August 2, 2019 12:21:59 Thomas A. Lingner

    that all Salonica had gone, this was

    succeeded by a general apathy in 

    which nobody seemed to care about 

    anything.

      By then it was a normal sight to

    see a new street afire and the refugees,

    who were lying everywhere on 

    their goods and chattels near the

    port, looked on with apparently unheeding

    eyes.

      By nine the fire after running in

    a long straight line east turned 

    south in obedience to the wind and

    leaped the Rue Egnatia in its stride,

    the vaulted wooden roof of the

    bazaar acting as a perfect conductor

    down into the commercial quarter.

    From then onwards to eleven I 

    observed the fire a number of times

    from the flat roof, watching its 

    progress with a very personal

    interest, and one looked into several

    square miles of flame in which here 

    and there white minarets stood out

    with striking effect, and extraordinary

    to relate all of them came through

    the furnace unscathed except for the

    loss of their metal tops.

      By ten o'clock I had decided to

    become a refugee myself. A little

    while after the flat roof was ablaze

    and by eleven all the streets running

    near and parallel to the water's edge

    were repeating the same scene (on a 

    larger scale) which had been witnessed

    a few hours before away up the

    hill.

      By midnight everybody had realised

    that the whole water front was

    doomed and then the flames, executing

    a quick flank movement just

    short of the White Tower, cut into 

    the water front so that the only

    exit from the town was towards the

    Monastir Road.

      Long before this time better methods

    had got to work, hoses were 

    run out from navy lighters near the 

    quay wall and the British Army was

    doing good work with two modern fire

    engines, but it was all merely like

    shaking one's fist at the fire. From 

    now onwards every effort was directed

    towards helping and saving 

    the refugees by the aid of

    the admirable Allied transport

    service. Lorries and motor cars

    were brought in apparently

    unlimited quantities. I saw scores and

    scores of motor lorries loaded up with

    men, women, children, babies and

    their poor effects - those that had

    not been thrown away - and it was

    heartening to see the way in which

    officers and men behaved to this multitude

    of distracted or numbed people

    of whose language they understood

    not a word. "Come on, mother we'll

    hand the ids up afterwards," I remember

    one man saying to a wrinkled

    dame in a comic opera costume, and

    that sort of homely little touch was 

    being repeated a dozen times a minute.

      At this time it seemed as though

    the only exit from the town would be

    cut off and that the sea would be the 

    only escape for great numbers of the

    multitude, and on the one crowded 

    line of communication there were

    scenes of great anxiety. Here again

    the Navy came into service, all lighters 

    possible were run into the 

    quay wall and the crowds and their 

    baggage were conducted or carried

    on board, it being often a case of old 

    folks as well as children in 

    arms. One cannot imagine greater

    solicitude than our men displayed,

    and everybody worked like niggers

    evacuating the homeless crowds by 

    road and sea.

      And with the front now beginning 

    to blaze and apparently the whole 

    city one mass of flame one cannot imagine

    a more grim and fantastic sight

    than that of the escaping multitude

    who awoke from their dumb inertia

    as they saw some chance of help

    and climbed into the motor lorries

    amid a babel of cries and counter-cries,

    with here and there a distracted

    mother raising her voice in a hoarse

    scream for a missing infant. By the

    time the front was blazing, in one

    great cliff of orange and white light,

    practically all the people had been 

    got out of harm's way.

      Then we stood there and watched

    the familiar buildings which, after

    a year or two year's residence we

    know as we know home disappear

    one by one. Venizelos street was an

    arcade of flame with hops crashing

    down and clouds of fire shooting up.

    On the front the rebuilt Hotel Splendide

    was a melancholy glory of flame

    and ruin with its spacious new

    restaurant and tea rooms gone after

    a few month's life. But the strangest

    sight of all was the Place de la

    Liberte, the centre of Salonica life

    with its crowded café terraces and

    where the Allied military bands

    played three days a week. At about

    2.30 a.m. its destruction, began, the 

    famous Café Floca became a burst of

    red flames, and brickwork and tiles

    came rattling down. It was a sad sight

    to see the beginning of the destruction 

    of the Cercle des Etrangers

    the one real club - and

    a good one - founded some 

    forty years ago by a British consul

    and the scene of innumerable meetings

    and friendships among British 

    officers here down from the 

    front for a few days.

      And at something after four, sated

    with reeling raging destruction, I

    turned from the blazing front and

    began to think of seeking a lodging

    for the night somewhere in the

    mountain up on the Monastir

    Street along which the refugee

    caravan was rumbling.

    At least two extraordinary fire 

    freaks have so far come under my 

    notice. Stein's Oriental Stores, on

    the corner of Place de la Liberté,

    escaped without the slightest damage

    not even a window being broken. It 

    is faced with marble, which perhaps

    accounts for its immunity, and it is

    indeed ironical that the one shop

    which has escaped in all the region

    should be one which is on the list as

    having enemy connections, and

    therefore is not to be traded with by

    the Allied troops.

      And amid a world of complete 

    ruin with buildings of fantastic

    shapes all around it the office of the

    Balkan News, the newspaper published

    here for the British Army, has so 

    far escaped completely and seems

    likely to do so in spite of fires which 

    are still burning in many quarters

    of the city.

      The Balkan News was printing until

    nearly eleven o'clock but then found

    it impossible to get papers away. At

    present of course all motor power is

    cut off but it is expected to start

    publication again very soon.

      Yesterday (Monday) a Boche aeroplane

    came over to see what damage

    had been done. It was briskly shelled 

    by the Allied guns but must have gone

    away with a very satisfying report to

    make. 

      Everything possible is now being 

    done for the many thousands of 

    refugees who at present are camped

    on the outskirts of the city.

      H. C. OWEN

    ----------------------

    No Papers

      An official note says: Owing

    to a fire which broke out in 

    Salonica on Saturday night no

    local papers have been able to

    appear. No military damage 

    has been caused by this fire,

    but considerable civilian property 

    has been destroyed.

    ------------------------

    Stand of the Russian Armies

      London Monday: The Observer,

    discussing the situation in 

    the Russian armies, says that the 

    7th and 11th Russian armies

    rallied on the river Zbruch, and 

    the Germans are now being 

    held up on the Galician frontier. 

      Between the Doiester and

    the Pruth the Austrians are

    being turned back from Bassarabia.


    Saturday's British Officials.

      Land forces: - Early 

    this morning the enemy delivered 

    another counter-attack 

    against our recently captured 

    positions immediately northwest 

    of Lens. His troops were 

    again completely repulsed. After 

    sharp fighting we secured 

    a few prisoners. There has been 

    considerable hostile artillery

    activity during the night in 

    this neighborhood and also 

    northeast of Ypres. 

      Later : In addition to the 

    hostile attacks north west of 

    Lens reported in this morning's 

    communiqué, the enemy made 

    two other counter-attacks early 

    this morning on this front;  

    one east of Loos and the other 

    in the neighborhood of Bois

    Hugo. In the first case, the 

    enemy's attacking troops were 

    caught by our barrage and 

    machine - gun fire at short 

    range and driven back in 

    disorder after heavy losses. In 

    the second attack also the 

    enemy's infantry though supported 

    by flammenwerfer failed 

    to reach our trenches. On the 

    Ypres battle front hostile artillery

    has been quieter.

      Sea forces: The admiral 

    announces that some 

    of our light naval forces scouting

    in the German Bight on 

    the 16th August (Thursday)

    sighted an enemy destroyer at 

    9.45 a. m. Fire was opened,

    and the enemy destroyer was 

    chased. She was seen to be 

    repeatedly hit and afire, but 

    escaped through the mist over

    a minefield.

      Enemy mine-sweepers were 

    sighted shortly after sighting 

    the destroyer and heavy fire

    opened upon them. At least 

    two of the mine-sweepers were 

    seen to be severely damaged,

    but as in the case of 

    the destroyer, our ships were

    unable to follow them owing

    to the proximity of mine-fields.

      During the engagements our 

    vessels were attacked by a

    submarine and after the action

    a second submarine attacked,

    in both cases without result.

    Our vessels suffered no damage

    whatever. 

      Air Forces: - The R. N. 

    A. S. raided Thourout railway

    station and junction during 

    the night of Thursday. It 

    is thought that an ammunition

    dump was hit and the railway

    damaged. Many tons of bombs 

    were dropped.

      On the Western front, in 

    air fighting 12 German aeroplanes

    were brought down and 

    8 driven out of control.

    12 of our machines are missing.

    ------

    Saturday's French Official:

      In Belgium our troops continued

    to make progress north of

    the Bixschoote-Langemarckroad

    and carried an enemy strong 

    point east of the Steenbeke.

      During the day of the 17th

    and the night 111 aeroplanes

    took part in various flights in

    the course of which 13,000

    kilograms of projectiles were

    dropped.



  • August 2, 2019 02:02:55 Thomas A. Lingner

    that all Salonica had gone, this was

    succeeded by a general apathy in 

    which nobody seemed to care about 

    anything.

      By then it was a normal sight to

    see a new street afire and the refugees,

    who were lying everywhere on 

    their goods and chattels near the

    port, looked on with apparently unheeding

    eyes.

      By nine the fire after running in

    a long straight line east turned 

    south in obedience to the wind and

    leaped the Rue Egnatia in its stride,

    the vaulted wooden roof of the

    bazaar acting as a perfect conductor

    down into the commercial quarter.

    From then onwards to eleven I 

    observed the fire a number of times

    from the flat roof, watching its 

    progress with a very personal

    interest, and one looked into several

    square miles of flame in which here 

    and there white minarets stood out

    with striking effect, and extraordinary

    to relate all of them came through

    the furnace unscathed except for the

    loss of their metal tops.

      By ten o'clock I had decided to

    become a refugee myself. A little

    while after the flat roof was ablaze

    and by eleven all the streets running

    near and parallel to the water's edge

    were repeating the same scene (on a 

    larger scale) which had been witnessed

    a few hours before away up the

    hill.

      By midnight everybody had realised

    that the whole water front was

    doomed and then the flames, executing

    a quick flank movement just

    short of the White Tower, cut into 

    the water front so that the only

    exit from the town was towards the

    Monastir Road.

      Long before this time better methods

    had got to work, hoses were 

    run out from navy lighters near the 

    quay wall and the British Army was

    doing good work with two modern fire

    engines, but it was all merely like

    shaking one's fist at the fire. From 

    now onwards every effort was directed

    towards helping and saving 

    the refugees by the aid of

    the admirable Allied transport

    service. Lorries and motor cars

    were brought in apparently

    unlimited quantities. I saw scores and

    scores of motor lorries loaded up with

    men, women, children, babies and

    their poor effects - those that had

    not been thrown away - and it was

    heartening to see the way in which

    officers and men behaved to this multitude

    of distracted or numbed people

    of whose language they understood

    not a word. "Come on, mother we'll

    hand the ids up afterwards," I remember

    one man saying to a wrinkled

    dame in a comic opera costume, and

    that sort of homely little touch was 

    being repeated a dozen times a minute.

      At this time it seemed as though

    the only exit from the town would be

    cut off and that the sea would be the 

    only escape for great numbers of the

    multitude, and on the one crowded 

    line of communication there were

    scenes of great anxiety. Here again

    the Navy came into service, all lighters 

    possible were run into the 

    quay wall and the crowds and their 

    baggage were conducted or carried

    on board, it being often a case of old 

    folks as well as children in 

    arms. One cannot imagine greater

    solicitude than our men displayed,

    and everybody worked like niggers

    evacuating the homeless crowds by 

    road and sea.

      And with the front now beginning 

    to blaze and apparently the whole 

    city one mass of flame one cannot imagine

    a more grim and fantastic sight

    than that of the escaping multitude

    who awoke from their dumb inertia

    as they saw some chance of help

    and climbed into the motor lorries

    amid a babel of cries and counter-cries,

    with here and there a distracted

    mother raising her voice in a hoarse

    scream for a missing infant. By the

    time the front was blazing, in one

    great cliff of orange and white light,

    practically all the people had been 

    got out of harm's way.

      Then we stood there and watched

    the familiar buildings which, after

    a year or two year's residence we

    know as we know home disappear

    one by one. Venizelos street was an

    arcade of flame with hops crashing

    down and clouds of fire shooting up.

    On the front the rebuilt Hotel Splendide

    was a melancholy glory of flame

    and ruin with its spacious new

    restaurant and tea rooms gone after

    a few month's life. But the strangest

    sight of all was the Place de la

    Liberte, the centre of Salonica life

    with its crowded café terraces and

    where the Allied military bands

    played three days a week. At about

    2.30 a.m. its destruction, began, the 

    famous Café Floca became a burst of

    red flames, and brickwork and tiles

    came rattling down. It was a sad sight

    to see the beginning of the destruction 

    of the Cercle des Etrangers

    the one real club - and

    a good one - founded some 

    forty years ago by a British consul

    and the scene of innumerable meetings

    and friendships among British 

    officers here down from the 

    front for a few days.

      And at something after four, sated

    with reeling raging destruction, I

    turned from the blazing front and

    began to think of seeking a lodging

    for the night somewhere in the

    mountain up on the Monastir

    Street along which the refugee

    caravan was rumbling.

    At least two extraordinary fire 

    freaks have so far come under my 

    notice. Stein's Oriental Stores, on

    the corner of Place de la Liberté,

    escaped without the slightest damage

    not even a window being broken. It 

    is faced with marble, which perhaps

    accounts for its immunity, and it is

    indeed ironical that the one shop

    which has escaped in all the region

    should be one which is on the list as

    having enemy connections, and

    therefore is not to be traded with by

    the Allied troops.

      And amid a world of complete 

    ruin with buildings of fantastic

    shapes all around it the office of the

    Balkan News, the newspaper published

    here for the British Army, has so 

    far escaped completely and seems

    likely to do so in spite of fires which 

    are still burning in many quarters

    of the city.

      The Balkan News was printing until

    nearly eleven o'clock but then found

    it impossible to get papers away. At

    present of course all motor power is

    cut off but it is expected to start

    publication again very soon.

      Yesterday (Monday) a Boche aeroplane

    came over to see what damage

    had been done. It was briskly shelled 

    by the Allied guns but must have gone

    away with a very satisfying report to

    make. 

      Everything possible is now being 

    done for the many thousands of 

    refugees who at present are camped

    on the outskirts of the city.

      H. C. OWEN


  • August 2, 2019 01:56:04 Thomas A. Lingner

    that all Salonica had gone, this was

    succeeded by a general apathy in 

    which nobody seemed to care about 

    anything.

      By then it was a normal sight to

    see a new street afire and the refugees,

    who were lying everywhere on 

    their goods and chattels near the

    port, looked on with apparently unheeding

    eyes.

      By nine the fire after running in

    a long straight line east turned 

    south in obedience to the wind and

    leaped the Rue Egnatia in its stride,

    the vaulted wooden roof of the

    bazaar acting as a perfect conductor

    down into the commercial quarter.

    From then onwards to eleven I 

    observed the fire a number of times

    from the flat roof, watching its 

    progress with a very personal

    interest, and one looked into several

    square miles of flame in which here 

    and there white minarets stood out

    with striking effect, and extraordinary

    to relate all of them came through

    the furnace unscathed except for the

    loss of their metal tops.

      By ten o'clock I had decided to

    become a refugee myself. A little

    while after the flat roof was ablaze

    and by eleven all the streets running

    near and parallel to the water's edge

    were repeating the same scene (on a 

    larger scale) which had been witnessed

    a few hours before away up the

    hill.

      By midnight everybody had realised

    that the whole water front was

    doomed and then the flames, executing

    a quick flank movement just

    short of the White Tower, cut into 

    the water front so that the only

    exit from the town was towards the

    Monastir Road.

      Long before this time better methods

    had got to work, hoses were 

    run out from navy lighters near the 

    quay wall and the British Army was

    doing good work with two modern fire

    engines, but it was all merely like

    shaking one's fist at the fire. From 

    now onwards every effort was directed

    towards helping and saving 

    the refugees by the aid of

    the admirable Allied transport

    service. Lorries and motor cars

    were brought in apparently

    unlimited quantities. I saw scores and

    scores of motor lorries loaded up with

    men, women, children, babies and

    their poor effects - those that had

    not been thrown away - and it was

    heartening to see the way in which

    officers and men behaved to this multitude

    of distracted or numbed people

    of whose language they understood

    not a word. "Come on, mother we'll

    hand the ids up afterwards," I remember

    one man saying to a wrinkled

    dame in a comic opera costume, and

    that sort of homely little touch was 

    being repeated a dozen times a minute.

      At this time it seemed as though

    the only exit from the town would be

    cut off and that the sea would be the 

    only escape for great numbers of the

    multitude, and on the one crowded 

    line of communication there were

    scenes of great anxiety. Here again

    the Navy came into service, all lighters 

    possible were run into the 

    quay wall and the crowds and their 

    baggage were conducted or carried

    on board, it being often a case of old 

    folks as well as children in 

    arms. One cannot imagine greater

    solicitude than our men displayed,

    and everybody worked like niggers

    evacuating the homeless crowds by 

    road and sea.

      And with the front now beginning 

    to blaze and apparently the whole 

    city one mass of flame one cannot imagine

    a more grim and fantastic sight

    than that of the escaping multitude

    who awoke from their dumb inertia

    as they saw some chance of help

    and climbed into the motor lorries

    amid a babel of cries and counter-cries,

    with here and there a distracted

    mother raising her voice in a hoarse

    scream for a missing infant. By the

    time the front was blazing, in one

    great cliff of orange and white light,

    practically all the people had been 

    got out of harm's way.

      Then we stood there and watched

    the familiar buildings which, after

    a year or two year's residence we

    know as we know home disappear

    one by one. Venizelos street was an

    arcade of flame with hops crashing

    down and clouds of fire shooting up.

    On the front the rebuilt Hotel Splendide

    was a melancholy glory of flame

    and ruin with its spacious new

    restaurant and tea rooms gone after

    a few month's life. But the strangest

    sight of all was the Place de la

    Liberte, the centre of Salonica life

    with its crowded café terraces and

    where the Allied military bands

    played three days a week. At about

    2.30 a.m. its destruction, began, the 

    famous Café Floca became a burst of

    red flames, and brickwork and tiles

    came rattling down. It was a sad sight

    to see the beginning of the destruction 

    of the Cercle des Etrangers

    the one real club - and

    a good one - founded some 

    forty years ago by a British consul

    and the scene of innumerable meetings

    and friendships among British 

    officers here down from the 

    front for a few days.

      And at something after four, sated

    with 


  • August 2, 2019 01:45:52 Thomas A. Lingner

    that all Salonica had gone, this was

    succeeded by a general apathy in 

    which nobody seemed to care about 

    anything.

      By then it was a normal sight to

    see a new street afire and the refugees,

    who were lying everywhere on 

    their goods and chattels near the

    port, looked on with apparently unheeding

    eyes.

      By nine the fire after running in

    a long straight line east turned 

    south in obedience to the wind and

    leaped the Rue Egnatia in its stride,

    the vaulted wooden roof of the

    bazaar acting as a perfect conductor

    down into the commercial quarter.

    From then onwards to eleven I 

    observed the fire a number of times

    from the flat roof, watching its 

    progress with a very personal

    interest, and one looked into several

    square miles of flame in which here 

    and there white minarets stood out

    with striking effect, and extraordinary

    to relate all of them came through

    the furnace unscathed except for the

    loss of their metal tops.

      By ten o'clock I had decided to

    become a refugee myself. A little

    while after the flat roof was ablaze

    and by eleven all the streets running

    near and parallel to the water's edge

    were repeating the same scene (on a 

    larger scale) which had been witnessed

    a few hours before away up the

    hill.

      By midnight everybody had realised

    that the whole water front was

    doomed and then the flames, executing

    a quick flank movement just

    short of the White Tower, cut into 

    the water front so that the only

    exit from the town was towards the

    Monastir Road.

      Long before this time better methods

    had got to work, hoses were 

    run out from navy lighters near the 

    quay wall and the British Army was

    doing good work with two modern fire

    engines, but it was all merely like

    shaking one's fist at the fire. From 

    now onwards every effort was directed

    towards helping and saving 

    the refugees by the aid of

    the admirable Allied transport

    service. Lorries and motor cars

    were brought in apparently

    unlimited quantities. I saw scores and

    scores of motor lorries loaded up with

    men, women, children, babies and

    their poor effects - those that had

    not been thrown away - and it was

    heartening to see the way in which

    officers and men behaved to this multitude

    of distracted or numbed people

    of whose language they understood

    not a word. 


Description

Save description
  • 40.6400629||22.944419100000005||

    Salonika

    ||1
Location(s)
  • Story location Salonika


ID
19509 / 221735
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
Sarah Wedderburn
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


August 22, 1917

  • Balkans

  • Women



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