page of war diary transcript

Edit transcription:
...
Transcription saved
Enhance your transcribing experience by using full-screen mode

Transcription

You have to be logged in to transcribe. Please login or register and click the pencil-button again

The 'Chester Chronicle' dated 24/4/1947 carried a report after interviewing

Major Claridge which reads:

"There must be very few people who have been in the Services and not done

'sentry go.' One of them is Major George Claridge , a Holywell veteran who

last Thursday night, was presented by members of the local branch with a

certificate of life membership of the (British) Legion. Now 79, Major

Claridge has been an outstanding figure in local affairs for many years;

and has been Chairman since the branch was reformed in 1930. He joined the

Service at the age of 16 1/2, and following initial training at Wrexham joined

his regiment in County  Cork, soon becoming a Lance corporal and not long

after a Corporal, no mean achievement in the old days of the regular Army.

He had some interesting experiences to recall about the conditions that

existed in Ireland in those days during the boycotting, when all soldiers

had to be extremely careful after the hours of darkness.

As they were not allowed to carry bayonets or weapons, it was their

practice , he confessed , to take the barrack room poker up their sleeves on

a piece of string and trail it along the ground when they were passing any

suspected side turning, no doubt as a warning to would be attackers, but

there was the light side, too, and he told how he and two other young

Corporals visiting a local hostelry for a supper of porter , pigs feet and

potatoes, took the grandfather's clock from the inn and hung it on the

railings outside the offices of the County Constabulary! - a prank to

capture the heart of any young soldier. The next day they were 'on the

mat', but the Commanding Officer looked upon it as a boys escapade!"

.....................................................................................................

His service record reveals that he was mentioned in despatches twice and

reads:-

'Mentioned in despatches and awarded the next higher rate of pay for

services in the field.'

'Mentioned in despatches of General Sir H. Murray G.C.M.G, K.C.B, C in C

Egyptian Exp. Field Force, for gallant and distinguished service in the

field.'

This second honour was obtained during the period of duty in Palestine.

Medals awarded during his career are as follows:-

1914-15 Medal, Long Service Medal, Victory Medal 1914-1919, Coronation

Medal (George 5th and Queen Mary), 'Good Conduct Medal' (06/04/1903),

Meritorious Service Medal (*), 'Territorial Decoration' (30/01/1925),

The bronze oak leaf fixed to the Victory Medal ribbon denotes 'Mentioned in

despatches'.

(*) The Recommendation to receive the M.S.M. with annuity was made on 6th

Jan. 1906, Major Claridge was finally awarded it on 16th Dec. 1941, and

presented with it at Prestatyn on 19th Dec. 1942. The annuity was L 10.00.

                                          -25-



Transcription saved

The 'Chester Chronicle' dated 24/4/1947 carried a report after interviewing

Major Claridge which reads:

"There must be very few people who have been in the Services and not done

'sentry go.' One of them is Major George Claridge , a Holywell veteran who

last Thursday night, was presented by members of the local branch with a

certificate of life membership of the (British) Legion. Now 79, Major

Claridge has been an outstanding figure in local affairs for many years;

and has been Chairman since the branch was reformed in 1930. He joined the

Service at the age of 16 1/2, and following initial training at Wrexham joined

his regiment in County  Cork, soon becoming a Lance corporal and not long

after a Corporal, no mean achievement in the old days of the regular Army.

He had some interesting experiences to recall about the conditions that

existed in Ireland in those days during the boycotting, when all soldiers

had to be extremely careful after the hours of darkness.

As they were not allowed to carry bayonets or weapons, it was their

practice , he confessed , to take the barrack room poker up their sleeves on

a piece of string and trail it along the ground when they were passing any

suspected side turning, no doubt as a warning to would be attackers, but

there was the light side, too, and he told how he and two other young

Corporals visiting a local hostelry for a supper of porter , pigs feet and

potatoes, took the grandfather's clock from the inn and hung it on the

railings outside the offices of the County Constabulary! - a prank to

capture the heart of any young soldier. The next day they were 'on the

mat', but the Commanding Officer looked upon it as a boys escapade!"

.....................................................................................................

His service record reveals that he was mentioned in despatches twice and

reads:-

'Mentioned in despatches and awarded the next higher rate of pay for

services in the field.'

'Mentioned in despatches of General Sir H. Murray G.C.M.G, K.C.B, C in C

Egyptian Exp. Field Force, for gallant and distinguished service in the

field.'

This second honour was obtained during the period of duty in Palestine.

Medals awarded during his career are as follows:-

1914-15 Medal, Long Service Medal, Victory Medal 1914-1919, Coronation

Medal (George 5th and Queen Mary), 'Good Conduct Medal' (06/04/1903),

Meritorious Service Medal (*), 'Territorial Decoration' (30/01/1925),

The bronze oak leaf fixed to the Victory Medal ribbon denotes 'Mentioned in

despatches'.

(*) The Recommendation to receive the M.S.M. with annuity was made on 6th

Jan. 1906, Major Claridge was finally awarded it on 16th Dec. 1941, and

presented with it at Prestatyn on 19th Dec. 1942. The annuity was L 10.00.

                                          -25-




Transcription history
  • June 9, 2017 20:50:20 Annick Rodriguez

    The 'Chester Chronicle' dated 24/4/1947 carried a report after interviewing

    Major Claridge which reads:

    "There must be very few people who have been in the Services and not done

    'sentry go.' One of them is Major George Claridge , a Holywell veteran who

    last Thursday night, was presented by members of the local branch with a

    certificate of life membership of the (British) Legion. Now 79, Major

    Claridge has been an outstanding figure in local affairs for many years;

    and has been Chairman since the branch was reformed in 1930. He joined the

    Service at the age of 16 1/2, and following initial training at Wrexham joined

    his regiment in County  Cork, soon becoming a Lance corporal and not long

    after a Corporal, no mean achievement in the old days of the regular Army.

    He had some interesting experiences to recall about the conditions that

    existed in Ireland in those days during the boycotting, when all soldiers

    had to be extremely careful after the hours of darkness.

    As they were not allowed to carry bayonets or weapons, it was their

    practice , he confessed , to take the barrack room poker up their sleeves on

    a piece of string and trail it along the ground when they were passing any

    suspected side turning, no doubt as a warning to would be attackers, but

    there was the light side, too, and he told how he and two other young

    Corporals visiting a local hostelry for a supper of porter , pigs feet and

    potatoes, took the grandfather's clock from the inn and hung it on the

    railings outside the offices of the County Constabulary! - a prank to

    capture the heart of any young soldier. The next day they were 'on the

    mat', but the Commanding Officer looked upon it as a boys escapade!"

    .....................................................................................................

    His service record reveals that he was mentioned in despatches twice and

    reads:-

    'Mentioned in despatches and awarded the next higher rate of pay for

    services in the field.'

    'Mentioned in despatches of General Sir H. Murray G.C.M.G, K.C.B, C in C

    Egyptian Exp. Field Force, for gallant and distinguished service in the

    field.'

    This second honour was obtained during the period of duty in Palestine.

    Medals awarded during his career are as follows:-

    1914-15 Medal, Long Service Medal, Victory Medal 1914-1919, Coronation

    Medal (George 5th and Queen Mary), 'Good Conduct Medal' (06/04/1903),

    Meritorious Service Medal (*), 'Territorial Decoration' (30/01/1925),

    The bronze oak leaf fixed to the Victory Medal ribbon denotes 'Mentioned in

    despatches'.

    (*) The Recommendation to receive the M.S.M. with annuity was made on 6th

    Jan. 1906, Major Claridge was finally awarded it on 16th Dec. 1941, and

    presented with it at Prestatyn on 19th Dec. 1942. The annuity was L 10.00.

                                              -25-



  • June 9, 2017 20:45:44 Annick Rodriguez

    The 'Chester Chronicle' dated 24/4/1947 carried a report after interviewing

    Major Claridge which reads:

    "There must be very few people who have been in the Services and not done

    'sentry go.' One of them is Major George Claridge , a Holywell veteran who

    last Thursday night, was presented by members of the local branch with a

    certificate of life membership of the (British) Legion. Now 79, Major

    Claridge has been an outstanding figure in local affairs for many years;

    and has been Chairman since the branch was reformed in 1930. He joined the

    Service at the age of 16 1/2, and following initial training at Wrexham joined

    his regiment in County  Cork, soon becoming a Lance corporal and not long

    after a Corporal, no mean achievement in the old days of the regular Army.

    He had some interesting experiences to recall about the conditions that

    existed in Ireland in those days during the boycotting, when all soldiers

    had to be extremely careful after the hours of darkness.

    As they were not allowed to carry bayonets or weapons, it was their

    practice , he confessed , to take the barrack room poker up their sleeves on

    a piece of string and trail it along the ground when they were passing any

    suspected side turning, no doubt as a warning to would be attackers, but

    there was the light side, too, and he told how he and two other young

    Corporals visiting a local hostelry for a supper of porter , pigs feet and

    potatoes, took the grandfather's clock from the inn and hung it on the

    railings outside the offices of the County Constabulary! - a prank to

    capture the heart of any young soldier. The next day they were 'on the

    mat', but the Commanding Officer looked upon it as a boys escapade!"

    .....................................................................................................

    His service record reveals that he was mentioned in despatches twice and

    reads:-

    'Mentioned in despatches and awarded the next higher rate of pay for

    services in the field.'

    'Mentioned in despatches of General Sir H. Murray G.C.M.G, K.C.B, C in C

    Egyptian Exp. Field Force, for gallant and distinguished service in the

    field.'

    This second





  • June 9, 2017 20:44:09 Annick Rodriguez

    The 'Chester Chronicle' dated 24/4/1947 carried a report after interviewing

    Major Claridge which reads:

    "There must be very few people who have been in the Services and not done

    'sentry go.' One of them is Major George Claridge , a Holywell veteran who

    last Thursday night, was presented by members of the local branch with a

    certificate of life membership of the (British) Legion. Now 79, Major

    Claridge has been an outstanding figure in local affairs for many years;

    and has been Chairman since the branch was reformed in 1930. He joined the

    Service at the age of 16 1/2, and following initial training at Wrexham joined

    his regiment in County  Cork, soon becoming a Lance corporal and not long

    after a Corporal, no mean achievement in the old days of the regular Army.

    He had some interesting experiences to recall about the conditions that

    existed in Ireland in those days during the boycotting, when all soldiers

    had to be extremely careful after the hours of darkness.

    As they were not allowed to carry bayonets or weapons, it was their

    practice , he confessed , to take the barrack room poker up their sleeves on

    a piece of string and trail it along the ground when they were passing any

    suspected side turning, no doubt as a warning to would be attackers, but

    there was the light side, too, and he told how he and two other young

    Corporals visiting a local hostelry for a supper of porter , pigs feet and

    potatoes, took the grandfather's clock from the inn and hung it on the

    railings outside the offices of the County Constabulary! - a prank to

    capture the heart of any young soldier. The next day they were 'on the

    mat', but the Commanding Officer looked upon it as a boys escapade!"

    .....................................................................................................

    His service record reveals that he was mentioned in despatches twice and

    reads:-





  • June 9, 2017 20:40:12 Annick Rodriguez

    The 'Chester Chronicle' dated 24/4/1947 carried a report after interviewing

    Major Claridge which reads:

    "There must be very few people who have been in the Services and not done

    'sentry go.' One of them is Major George Claridge , a Holywell veteran who

    last Thursday night, was presented by members of the local branch with a

    certificate of life membership of the (British) Legion. Now 79, Major

    Claridge has been an outstanding figure in local affairs for many years;

    and has been Chairman since the branch was reformed in 1930. He joined the

    Service at the age of 16 1/2, and following initial training at Wrexham joined

    his regiment in County  Cork, soon becoming a Lance corporal and not long

    after a Corporal, no mean achievement in the old days of the regular Army.

    He had some interesting experiences to recall about the conditions that

    existed in Ireland in those days during the boycotting, when all soldiers

    had to be extremely careful after the hours of darkness.

    As they were not allowed to carry bayonets or weapons, it was their



  • June 9, 2017 20:38:12 Annick Rodriguez

    The 'Chester Chronicle' dated 24/4/1947 carried a report after interviewing

    Major Claridge which reads:

    "There must be very few people who have been in the Services and not done

    'sentry go.' One of them is Major George Claridge , a Holywell veteran who

    last Thursday night, was presented by members of the local branch with a

    certificate of life membership of the (British) Legion. Now 79, Major

    Claridge has been an outstanding figure in local affairs for many years;

    and has been Chairman since the branch was reformed in 1930. He joined the

    Service at the age of 16 1/2, and following initial training at Wrexham joined

    his regiment in County  Cork, soon becoming a Lance corporal and not long

    after a Corporal, no mean achievement in the old days of the regular Army.



  • June 9, 2017 20:30:50 Annick Rodriguez

    The 'Chester Chronicle' dated 24/4/1947 carried a report after interviewing

    Major Claridge which reads:

    "There must be very few 


Description

Save description
  • 40.3333333||26.5||

    Gallipoli

    ||1
Location(s)
  • Story location Gallipoli


ID
17708 / 202418
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
David Harrison
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


  • English

  • Gallipoli Front




Notes and questions

Login to leave a note