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The following additional  notes have been entered on a separate page by the

eldest child- Doris Mary Shallcroft (Claridge).

"During the 1915 Gallipoli campaign the R.C. Padre was Father Paul Hook

(later Monsigneur) of the Jesuit School (College?) called St. Mary's in

High Street , Holywell. The present Post Office now occupies the site.

Captain Claridge and Father Hook were great  friends. After the 1914/18 war

Father Hook died in a Cardiff hospital as a result of sickness and

has his shirt off for a whole month. Captain Claridge was full of

admiration for this devotion to duty attending to the sick and wounded.

In August 1917 Captain Claridge's Mare (Bess) was taken to hospital after

being wounded 4 times and later died.

In 1918 Captain George Claridge was in hospital at Llandaff, Cardiff and

was later invalided out."

.............................................................................................

It is worth remembering that at the time the allied forces left Gallipoli

on 20th December 1915 the casualty figures were:-

            Dead --25,000.   Wounded--76,000.  Missing ---13,000.

                          Sick admitted to hospital---96,000

................................................................................................

                          Other details of George Claridge's military career.

"George Claridge's service record reveals that he enlisted in the Royal

Welsh Fusiliers on 15th September 1884 aged 16 years. He was in Great

Britain and served in Ireland at one stage, before being ordered to India

in December 1886. He served in that country continually until December

1896, returning home on the troopship 'Brittania'.

While in India he qualified in a foreign language speaking lower standard

'Pushta' on the 6th April 1891.

In 1893, after attending the School of Musketry at Changla Gali he

qualified as a Sergeant Instructor to a Regiment or Battalion.

The 'Royal Small Arms Factory' in Birmingham was where he passed a course

of small arms in 1899, and in Wrexham (Barracks) he qualified for the post

of Quartermaster. He is also credited as having a (quote) 'Good knowledge

of clerical duties in all military departments. Good organiser' (unquote).

Having worked his way up through the ranks he is shown as being Cr. Sgt.

(A.S.M.) (Colour Sergeant- Acting Sergeant Major) upon being discharged at

his own request from the regular army on 15th July 1908. He had served for

23 years 305 days.

                                           -23-


Transcription saved

The following additional  notes have been entered on a separate page by the

eldest child- Doris Mary Shallcroft (Claridge).

"During the 1915 Gallipoli campaign the R.C. Padre was Father Paul Hook

(later Monsigneur) of the Jesuit School (College?) called St. Mary's in

High Street , Holywell. The present Post Office now occupies the site.

Captain Claridge and Father Hook were great  friends. After the 1914/18 war

Father Hook died in a Cardiff hospital as a result of sickness and

has his shirt off for a whole month. Captain Claridge was full of

admiration for this devotion to duty attending to the sick and wounded.

In August 1917 Captain Claridge's Mare (Bess) was taken to hospital after

being wounded 4 times and later died.

In 1918 Captain George Claridge was in hospital at Llandaff, Cardiff and

was later invalided out."

.............................................................................................

It is worth remembering that at the time the allied forces left Gallipoli

on 20th December 1915 the casualty figures were:-

            Dead --25,000.   Wounded--76,000.  Missing ---13,000.

                          Sick admitted to hospital---96,000

................................................................................................

                          Other details of George Claridge's military career.

"George Claridge's service record reveals that he enlisted in the Royal

Welsh Fusiliers on 15th September 1884 aged 16 years. He was in Great

Britain and served in Ireland at one stage, before being ordered to India

in December 1886. He served in that country continually until December

1896, returning home on the troopship 'Brittania'.

While in India he qualified in a foreign language speaking lower standard

'Pushta' on the 6th April 1891.

In 1893, after attending the School of Musketry at Changla Gali he

qualified as a Sergeant Instructor to a Regiment or Battalion.

The 'Royal Small Arms Factory' in Birmingham was where he passed a course

of small arms in 1899, and in Wrexham (Barracks) he qualified for the post

of Quartermaster. He is also credited as having a (quote) 'Good knowledge

of clerical duties in all military departments. Good organiser' (unquote).

Having worked his way up through the ranks he is shown as being Cr. Sgt.

(A.S.M.) (Colour Sergeant- Acting Sergeant Major) upon being discharged at

his own request from the regular army on 15th July 1908. He had served for

23 years 305 days.

                                           -23-



Transcription history
  • June 9, 2017 18:47:21 Annick Rodriguez

    The following additional  notes have been entered on a separate page by the

    eldest child- Doris Mary Shallcroft (Claridge).

    "During the 1915 Gallipoli campaign the R.C. Padre was Father Paul Hook

    (later Monsigneur) of the Jesuit School (College?) called St. Mary's in

    High Street , Holywell. The present Post Office now occupies the site.

    Captain Claridge and Father Hook were great  friends. After the 1914/18 war

    Father Hook died in a Cardiff hospital as a result of sickness and

    has his shirt off for a whole month. Captain Claridge was full of

    admiration for this devotion to duty attending to the sick and wounded.

    In August 1917 Captain Claridge's Mare (Bess) was taken to hospital after

    being wounded 4 times and later died.

    In 1918 Captain George Claridge was in hospital at Llandaff, Cardiff and

    was later invalided out."

    .............................................................................................

    It is worth remembering that at the time the allied forces left Gallipoli

    on 20th December 1915 the casualty figures were:-

                Dead --25,000.   Wounded--76,000.  Missing ---13,000.

                              Sick admitted to hospital---96,000

    ................................................................................................

                              Other details of George Claridge's military career.

    "George Claridge's service record reveals that he enlisted in the Royal

    Welsh Fusiliers on 15th September 1884 aged 16 years. He was in Great

    Britain and served in Ireland at one stage, before being ordered to India

    in December 1886. He served in that country continually until December

    1896, returning home on the troopship 'Brittania'.

    While in India he qualified in a foreign language speaking lower standard

    'Pushta' on the 6th April 1891.

    In 1893, after attending the School of Musketry at Changla Gali he

    qualified as a Sergeant Instructor to a Regiment or Battalion.

    The 'Royal Small Arms Factory' in Birmingham was where he passed a course

    of small arms in 1899, and in Wrexham (Barracks) he qualified for the post

    of Quartermaster. He is also credited as having a (quote) 'Good knowledge

    of clerical duties in all military departments. Good organiser' (unquote).

    Having worked his way up through the ranks he is shown as being Cr. Sgt.

    (A.S.M.) (Colour Sergeant- Acting Sergeant Major) upon being discharged at

    his own request from the regular army on 15th July 1908. He had served for

    23 years 305 days.

                                               -23-


  • June 9, 2017 18:43:51 Annick Rodriguez

    The following additional  notes have been entered on a separate page by the

    eldest child- Doris Mary Shallcroft (Claridge).

    "During the 1915 Gallipoli campaign the R.C. Padre was Father Paul Hook

    (later Monsigneur) of the Jesuit School (College?) called St. Mary's in

    High Street , Holywell. The present Post Office now occupies the site.

    Captain Claridge and Father Hook were great  friends. After the 1914/18 war

    Father Hook died in a Cardiff hospital as a result of sickness and

    has his shirt off for a whole month. Captain Claridge was full of

    admiration for this devotion to duty attending to the sick and wounded.

    In August 1917 Captain Claridge's Mare (Bess) was taken to hospital after

    being wounded 4 times and later died.

    In 1918 Captain George Claridge was in hospital at Llandaff, Cardiff and

    was later invalided out."

    .............................................................................................

    It is worth remembering that at the time the allied forces left Gallipoli

    on 20th December 1915 the casualty figures were:-

                Dead --25,000.   Wounded--76,000.  Missing ---13,000.

                              Sick admitted to hospital---96,000

    ................................................................................................

                              Other details of George Claridge's military career.

    "George Claridge's service record reveals that he enlisted in the Royal

    Welsh Fusiliers on 15th September 1884 aged 16 years. He was in Great

    Britain and served in Ireland at one stage, before being ordered to India

    in December 1886. He served in that country continually until December

    1896, returning home on the troopship 'Brittania'.

    While in India he qualified in a foreign language speaking lower standard

    'Pushta' on the 6th April 1891.

    In 1893, after attending the School of Musketry at Changla Gali he

    qualified as a Sergeant Instructor to a Regiment or Battalion.



  • June 9, 2017 18:41:07 Annick Rodriguez

    The following additional  notes have been entered on a separate page by the

    eldest child- Doris Mary Shallcroft (Claridge).

    "During the 1915 Gallipoli campaign the R.C. Padre was Father Paul Hook

    (later Monsigneur) of the Jesuit School (College?) called St. Mary's in

    High Street , Holywell. The present Post Office now occupies the site.

    Captain Claridge and Father Hook were great  friends. After the 1914/18 war

    Father Hook died in a Cardiff hospital as a result of sickness and

    has his shirt off for a whole month. Captain Claridge was full of

    admiration for this devotion to duty attending to the sick and wounded.

    In August 1917 Captain Claridge's Mare (Bess) was taken to hospital after

    being wounded 4 times and later died.

    In 1918 Captain George Claridge was in hospital at Llandaff, Cardiff and

    was later invalided out."

    .............................................................................................

    It is worth remembering that at the time the allied forces left Gallipoli

    on 20th December 1915 the casualty figures were:-

                Dead --25,000.   Wounded--76,000.  Missing ---13,000.

                              Sick admitted to hospital---96,000

    ................................................................................................

                              Other details of George Claridge's military career.

    "George Claridge's service record reveals that he enlisted in the Royal

    Welsh Fusiliers on 15th September 1884 aged 16 years. He was in Great

    Britain and served in Ireland at one stage, before being ordered to India

    in December 1886. He served in that country continually until December

    1896, returning home on the troopship 'Brittania'.



  • June 9, 2017 18:39:11 Annick Rodriguez

    The following additional  notes have been entered on a separate page by the

    eldest child- Doris Mary Shallcroft (Claridge).

    "During the 1915 Gallipoli campaign the R.C. Padre was Father Paul Hook

    (later Monsigneur) of the Jesuit School (College?) called St. Mary's in

    High Street , Holywell. The present Post Office now occupies the site.

    Captain Claridge and Father Hook were great  friends. After the 1914/18 war

    Father Hook died in a Cardiff hospital as a result of sickness and

    has his shirt off for a whole month. Captain Claridge was full of

    admiration for this devotion to duty attending to the sick and wounded.

    In August 1917 Captain Claridge's Mare (Bess) was taken to hospital after

    being wounded 4 times and later died.

    In 1918 Captain George Claridge was in hospital at Llandaff, Cardiff and

    was later invalided out."

    .............................................................................................

    It is worth remembering that at the time the allied forces left Gallipoli

    on 20th December 1915 the casualty figures were:-

                Dead --25,000.   Wounded--76,000.  Missing ---13,000.

                              Sick admitted to hospital---96,000

    ................................................................................................

                              ´╗┐Other details of George Claridge's military career.



  • June 9, 2017 18:36:20 Annick Rodriguez

    The following additional  notes have been entered on a separate page by the

    eldest child- Doris Mary Shallcroft (Claridge).

    "During the 1915 Gallipoli campaign the R.C. Padre was Father Paul Hook

    (later Monsigneur) of the Jesuit School (College?) called St. Mary's in

    High Street , Holywell. The present Post Office now occupies the site.

    Captain Claridge and Father Hook were great  friends. After the 1914/18 war

    Father Hook died in a Cardiff hospital as a result of sickness and

    has his shirt off for a whole month. Captain Claridge was full of

    admiration for this devotion to duty attending to the sick and wounded.

    In August 1917 Captain Claridge's Mare (Bess) was taken to hospital after

    being wounded 4 times and later died.


  • June 9, 2017 18:35:11 Annick Rodriguez

    The following additional  notes have been entered on a separate page by the

    eldest child- Doris Mary Shallcroft (Claridge).

    "During the 1915 Gallipoli campaign the R.C. Padre was Father Paul Hook

    (later Monsigneur) of the Jesuit School (College?) called St. Mary's in

    High Street , Holywell. The present Post Office now occupies the site.

    Captain Claridge and Father Hook were great  friends. After the 1914/18 war

    Father Hook died in a Cardiff hospital as a result of sickness and

    has his shirt off for a whole month


Description

Save description
  • 40.3333333||26.5||

    Gallipoli

    ||1
Location(s)
  • Story location Gallipoli


ID
17708 / 202416
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
David Harrison
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


  • English

  • Gallipoli Front




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