George Williams grave

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Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


A white stone headstone engraved with:

13/280 PRIVATE
G. W. WILLIAMS
EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

 THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

 which is centred  

IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

for information only:

his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
https://www.cwgc.org/find
Private WILLIAMS, G W
Service Number 13/280
Died 13/11/1916
Aged 22
"B" Coy. 13th Bn.
East Yorkshire Regiment
Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), 
page 750

ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
General Report 11.1.19.
All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
"C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
(1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

(2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T.  Communication Trench  on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

page 752

(3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.

(R.M. Woolley - Officer in Charge "D" Company)  Captain Richard Melsome Woolley  

page 756

13th E. York. R.
List of Casualties which occurred on 13th Nov. 1916
13/280 Williams G.W.                        Missing (amongst many others)


Transcription saved

Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


A white stone headstone engraved with:

13/280 PRIVATE
G. W. WILLIAMS
EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

 THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

 which is centred  

IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

for information only:

his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
https://www.cwgc.org/find
Private WILLIAMS, G W
Service Number 13/280
Died 13/11/1916
Aged 22
"B" Coy. 13th Bn.
East Yorkshire Regiment
Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), 
page 750

ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
General Report 11.1.19.
All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
"C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
(1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

(2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T.  Communication Trench  on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

page 752

(3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.

(R.M. Woolley - Officer in Charge "D" Company)  Captain Richard Melsome Woolley  

page 756

13th E. York. R.
List of Casualties which occurred on 13th Nov. 1916
13/280 Williams G.W.                        Missing (amongst many others)



Transcription history
  • March 11, 2018 10:54:03 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS
    __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    for information only:

    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), 
    page 750

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T.  Communication Trench  on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 752

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.

    (R.M. Woolley - Officer in Charge "D" Company)  Captain Richard Melsome Woolley  

    page 756

    13th E. York. R.
    List of Casualties which occurred on 13th Nov. 1916
    13/280 Williams G.W.                        Missing (amongst many others)


  • March 1, 2018 14:16:27 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS
    __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    for information only:

    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), 
    page 750

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T.  Communication Trench  on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 752

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.

    (R.M. Woolley - Officer in Charge "D" Company)  Captain Richard Melsome Woolley  

    page 756

    13th E. York. R.
    List of Casualties which occurred on 13th Nov. 1916
    13/280 Williams G.W.                        Missing (amongst many others)



  • March 1, 2018 10:13:30 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS
    __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    for information only:

    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), 
    page 750

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T.  Communication Trench  on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 752

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.

    (R.M. Woolley - Officer in Charge "D" Company)

    page 756

    13th E. York. R.
    List of Casualties which occurred on 13th Nov. 1916
    13/280 Williams G.W.                        Missing (amongst many others)



  • February 27, 2018 23:43:40 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), 
    page 750

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T.  Communication Trench  on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 752

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.

    (R.M. Woolley - Officer in Charge "D" Company)

    page 756

    13th E. York. R.
    List of Casualties which occurred on 13th Nov. 1916
    13/280 Williams G.W.                        Missing (amongst many others)



  • February 27, 2018 11:01:30 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), 
    page 750

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 752

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.

    (R.M. Woolley - Officer in Charge "D" Company)

    page 756

    13th E. York. R.
    List of Casualties which occurred on 13th Nov. 1916
    13/280 Williams G.W.                        Missing (amongst many others)



  • February 27, 2018 10:59:13 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), 
    page 750

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 752

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.

    (R.M. Woolley Officer in Charge "D" Company)

    page 756

    13th E. York. R.
    List of Casualties which occurred on 13th Nov. 1916
    13/280 Williams G.W.                        Missing (amongst many others)



  • February 27, 2018 10:59:06 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), 
    page 750

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 752

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.

    (R.M. Woolley Officer in Charge "D" Company)

    page 756

    13th E. York. R.
    List of Casualties which occurred on 13th Nov. 1916
    13/280 Williams G.W.                        Missing (among many others)



  • February 27, 2018 10:52:52 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), 
    page 750

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 752

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.

    page 756

    13th E. York. R.
    List of Casualties which occurred on 13th Nov. 1916
    13/280 Williams G.W.                        Missing (among many others)



  • February 27, 2018 10:51:38 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), 
    page 750

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 752

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.

    page 756

    13th E. York. R.
    List of Casualties which occurred on 13th Nov. 1916
    13/380 Williams G.W.                        Missing



  • February 27, 2018 10:50:46 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), page 750

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.


    page 752

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.


    page 756

    13th E. York. R.
    List of Casualties which occurred on 13th Nov. 1916
    13/380 Williams G.W.                        Missing



  • February 27, 2018 10:40:40 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), page 750

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.


    page 752

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.


  • February 27, 2018 10:38:48 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), page 750

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 751

    Page 2

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.


  • February 27, 2018 10:10:29 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary on Ancestry.com 
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919), page 750

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 751

    Page 2

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.


  • February 26, 2018 21:25:11 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 751

    Page 2

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.


  • February 26, 2018 21:24:51 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn.  this is the company that George Williams was in  got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 751

    Page 2

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.


  • February 26, 2018 21:23:10 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.


    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans in force coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.


    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.


    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.


    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.


    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 751

    Page 2

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.


  • February 26, 2018 21:21:24 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.

    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.
    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.
    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.

    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.
    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 751

    Page 2

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.


  • February 26, 2018 21:21:00 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.

    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.
    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.
    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.

    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.
    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 751

    Page 2

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s.  But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.


  • February 26, 2018 21:20:51 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.

    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.
    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.
    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.

    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.
    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 751

    Page 2

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s. But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.


  • February 26, 2018 21:20:30 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.

    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.
    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.
    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.

    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.
    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 751

    Page 2

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s. But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SERRE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.


  • February 26, 2018 21:20:20 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.

    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.
    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.
    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.

    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.
    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 751

    Page 2

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between the platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s. But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SEERE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.


  • February 26, 2018 21:20:12 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.

    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.
    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.
    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.

    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.
    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 751

    Page 2

    (3) Pitch darkness at time of attack which made it very difficult to pick a track in the mud going in the right direction, and also made it very difficult to circumvent uncut wire. It made it impossible on such fearfully rough ground for connecting files to again gain touch between teh platoons which had to go left and right of the wire (uncut).
    On the 13th Battn's front later in the day, Germans seemed to have given up using second line except for machine guns, possibly, posted at junction with C.T.s. But they were holding their 3rd line in very great strength, being very thickly mustered all along this position which was on higher ground.
    Our barrage was excellent and our gun fire generally, later in the day, was doing much damage to the enemy. It seemed to cover all trenches near SEERE and go back to PUISIEUX and even on to batteries beyond.


  • February 26, 2018 21:14:31 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.

    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.
    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.
    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.

    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.
    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.

    page 751


  • February 26, 2018 21:14:08 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.

    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.
    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.
    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.

    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.
    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.

    (2) Suffolks losing direction on the right and failing to take C.T. on our right, left gap by which enemy could reinforce and work along with strong bombing parties and get flanking machine gun fire on our exposed men.


  • February 26, 2018 21:11:47 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.

    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.
    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.
    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, if it was at all, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.

    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.
    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.


  • February 26, 2018 21:08:50 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.

    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.
    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.
    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, of it was at ll, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.

    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible, fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.
    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured men were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.


  • February 26, 2018 21:08:30 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.

    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especially mentioned for his bravery and the fire fight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gun fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.
    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and those who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strength.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by German machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and found next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.
    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, of it was at ll, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the German 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.

    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible,fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.
    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured ment were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.


  • February 26, 2018 20:58:34 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.

    This officer, by every one who saw him, has been especialy mentioned for his bravery and the fire gight he put up. Absolutely fearless and self-forgotten, he was killed whilst thus bombing, either by enemy machine gune fire or by enemy bombs, both of which were in continual action against us during the fight.
    The men behaved splendidly and fought till ammunition gave out and thos who were not killed were captured independently in shellholes by the Germans who were in very much greater strengeth.
    "C" Company met the same fate on the right, mostly being caught by Germand machine gun fire whilst trying to get men out of mud. "C" Coy's officers were killed near the 2nd German line.

    Lieut. PATTERSON of this Company was very badly wounded and ofund next day by Germans.
    Lieut. LAMBERT of this company got back.
    I don't think the German 2nd line was ever occupied by our men on the 13th Battns. front, of it was at ll, by a very few who must have soon been enfiladed and killed, for at 11 a.m. British prisoners were being marched along in file behind me and between me and the Germand 2nd line, or the enemy could not have moved their prisoners in this way.

    Personally, I must have been lucky. I know the ground well and found, considering the mud which was a s bad as possible,fairly firm ground which could be got over and so was fortunate to reach the German 3rd line, where what I have described herewith took place.
    When near German 2nd line in the advance, seeing no one near us, I sent my runner to try and get in touch with flank platoons but failed to see him again.
    Later, I heard that he was knocked out for a time, recovered and got back to our line.
    The fact that our men failed, except my own small Coy. H.Q. party, to reach objectives, was due to the following caused:-
    (1) Fearful mud, slush and bog into which the men sank (one or two captured ment were eventually dug out the next day by Germans) - the ground was like a rough sea set in mud with water lying in the hollows.


  • February 26, 2018 20:46:12 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WW1 War Diary Ancestry.com page 750
    East Yorkshire Regiment 31st Division Piece 2357: 92 Infantry Brigade (1916 - 1919)

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


  • February 26, 2018 20:44:29 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, badly concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fire.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hips and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they were against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


  • February 26, 2018 20:43:49 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    ATTACK NEAR SERRE, 13TH Nov. 1916.
    Report by O.C. "D" Coy., 13th Battn. E.YORK.R.
    General Report 11.1.19.
    All Coys. of Battalion reached German 1st line. Suffolks on the Battalion's right were, I think, bady concentrated for the attack and in the darkness lost direction - going off to the right. This left the Germans an opportunity of coming down communication trench "T" and reinforcing 2nd line and getting in flanking M.G. fir.
    The platoons of my company and of "B" Company of the 13th Battn. got into difficulties in fearful mud between the German 1st and 2nd line. Men sank in above their hops and their officers were endeavouring to get them out and forward (our barrage having gone ahead whilst our men were foundered) when Germans inforce coming from the right along their 2nd line (having evidently taken advantage of Suffolks losing direction and leaving gap between 13th's right and their left (i.e. Communications trench "T" supposed to be taken by Suffolks) attacked them with machine gun fire and bombs, consequently they were forced to fight when they wer against great numbers.
    In this area, Lieut. PETERS and Lieut. LEWIS were killed, also Lieut. WOOD who was fighting very keenly, getting bombs passed to him whilst he knelt on the edge of a shell hole, bombing a machine gun and crew, who were flanking and killing our men and holding up advance.


  • February 26, 2018 11:53:10 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


  • February 26, 2018 11:52:43 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    for information only:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Yorkshire_Regiment
    The 10th, 11th, 12th and 13th (Service) Battalions were raised in September 1914 from men volunteering in Kingston upon Hull. These units were additionally entitled 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th City of Hull battalions and were known as the Hull Pals, nicknamed the 'Hull Commercials', 'Hull Tradesmen', 'Hull Sportsmen' and 'T'others' respectively. They formed 92nd Brigade in 31st Division, landed in Egypt in December 1915 and then moved to France in March 1916 also for service on the Western Front. Their depot companies became the 14th (Reserve) and 15th (Reserve) Battalions.[31][32][33]


  • February 26, 2018 11:50:56 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France:


    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    for information only:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Yorkshire_Regiment
    The 10th, 11th, 12th and 13th (Service) Battalions were raised in September 1914 from men volunteering in Kingston upon Hull. These units were additionally entitled 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th City of Hull battalions and were known as the Hull Pals, nicknamed the 'Hull Commercials', 'Hull Tradesmen', 'Hull Sportsmen' and 'T'others' respectively. They formed 92nd Brigade in 31st Division, landed in Egypt in December 1915 and then moved to France in March 1916 also for service on the Western Front. Their depot companies became the 14th (Reserve) and 15th (Reserve) Battalions.[31][32][33]


  • February 9, 2018 23:54:02 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France taken from his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:


    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    for information only:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Yorkshire_Regiment
    The 10th, 11th, 12th and 13th (Service) Battalions were raised in September 1914 from men volunteering in Kingston upon Hull. These units were additionally entitled 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th City of Hull battalions and were known as the Hull Pals, nicknamed the 'Hull Commercials', 'Hull Tradesmen', 'Hull Sportsmen' and 'T'others' respectively. They formed 92nd Brigade in 31st Division, landed in Egypt in December 1915 and then moved to France in March 1916 also for service on the Western Front. Their depot companies became the 14th (Reserve) and 15th (Reserve) Battalions.[31][32][33]


  • February 9, 2018 23:52:09 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France taken from his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:



    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

     THE WORDS 'EAST YORKSHIRE' IN A RIBBON BELOW A WHITE ROSE SET IN A STARBURST 

     which is centred  

    IN AN ENGRAVED CROSS


    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    for information only:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Yorkshire_Regiment
    The 10th, 11th, 12th and 13th (Service) Battalions were raised in September 1914 from men volunteering in Kingston upon Hull. These units were additionally entitled 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th City of Hull battalions and were known as the Hull Pals, nicknamed the 'Hull Commercials', 'Hull Tradesmen', 'Hull Sportsmen' and 'T'others' respectively. They formed 92nd Brigade in 31st Division, landed in Egypt in December 1915 and then moved to France in March 1916 also for service on the Western Front. Their depot companies became the 14th (Reserve) and 15th (Reserve) Battalions.[31][32][33]


  • February 9, 2018 23:50:00 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France taken from his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:



    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.



    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    which is centred
    IN A CROSS


    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    for information only:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Yorkshire_Regiment
    The 10th, 11th, 12th and 13th (Service) Battalions were raised in September 1914 from men volunteering in Kingston upon Hull. These units were additionally entitled 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th City of Hull battalions and were known as the Hull Pals, nicknamed the 'Hull Commercials', 'Hull Tradesmen', 'Hull Sportsmen' and 'T'others' respectively. They formed 92nd Brigade in 31st Division, landed in Egypt in December 1915 and then moved to France in March 1916 also for service on the Western Front. Their depot companies became the 14th (Reserve) and 15th (Reserve) Battalions.[31][32][33]


  • February 9, 2018 23:46:58 Stella Watkin

    Black and white photograph of the headstone of George William Williams at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France

    A white stone headstone engraved with:

    13/280 PRIVATE
    G. W. WILLIAMS
    EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    13TH NOVEMBER 1916 AGE 22

    this is ABOVE AN ENGRAVED COPY OF
    REGIMENTAL BADGE OF EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
    which is centred
    IN A CROSS

    taken from his details on the Commonwealth War Grave Commission:
    https://www.cwgc.org/find
    Private WILLIAMS, G W
    Service Number 13/280
    Died 13/11/1916
    Aged 22
    "B" Coy. 13th Bn.
    East Yorkshire Regiment
    Son of Annie M. Williams, of 4, Burleigh St., Hull, and the late William Williams.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    for information only:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Yorkshire_Regiment
    The 10th, 11th, 12th and 13th (Service) Battalions were raised in September 1914 from men volunteering in Kingston upon Hull. These units were additionally entitled 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th City of Hull battalions and were known as the Hull Pals, nicknamed the 'Hull Commercials', 'Hull Tradesmen', 'Hull Sportsmen' and 'T'others' respectively. They formed 92nd Brigade in 31st Division, landed in Egypt in December 1915 and then moved to France in March 1916 also for service on the Western Front. Their depot companies became the 14th (Reserve) and 15th (Reserve) Battalions.[31][32][33]


Description

Save description
  • 50.100616||2.601159||

    Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France

Location(s)
  • Document location Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France


ID
17242 / 190651
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
Brian Verity
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


November 13, 1916 – November 13, 1916
  • English

  • Western Front

  • Captain Richard Melsome Woolley
  • Colincamps, France
  • Commonwealth War Grave Commission
  • East Yorkshire Regiment
  • Euston Road Cemetery
  • George William Williams



Notes and questions

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