Charles Verity and George Williams

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Postcard sized, sepia, real photograph taken in a French photography studio in Amiens of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France 1916'.


On their caps are the badges for the East Yorkshire Regiment, they are wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed Flags (Union Jacks?) on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers. 


It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.  On the back of the postcard it says that he is with his friend George Williams, but looking at other photographs of him I don't think was him as he was blonde with feint eyebrows, he does have a caste in his eyes like him though.   I wondered if the other man was his brother, but cannot find anything to substantiate this, looks like he was a 'brother-in-arms' only.


http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
Record same as 10th Bn.
8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Charles Verity was living with his parents, John Edwin & Mary Jane Verity in the 1911 census at 

8 Denmark Grove, Holderness Road, Hull, when he was a Messenger for a Confectioner.

Transcription saved

Postcard sized, sepia, real photograph taken in a French photography studio in Amiens of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France 1916'.


On their caps are the badges for the East Yorkshire Regiment, they are wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed Flags (Union Jacks?) on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers. 


It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.  On the back of the postcard it says that he is with his friend George Williams, but looking at other photographs of him I don't think was him as he was blonde with feint eyebrows, he does have a caste in his eyes like him though.   I wondered if the other man was his brother, but cannot find anything to substantiate this, looks like he was a 'brother-in-arms' only.


http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
Record same as 10th Bn.
8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Charles Verity was living with his parents, John Edwin & Mary Jane Verity in the 1911 census at 

8 Denmark Grove, Holderness Road, Hull, when he was a Messenger for a Confectioner.


Transcription history
  • February 25, 2018 11:48:43 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized, sepia, real photograph taken in a French photography studio in Amiens of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France 1916'.


    On their caps are the badges for the East Yorkshire Regiment, they are wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed Flags (Union Jacks?) on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers. 


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.  On the back of the postcard it says that he is with his friend George Williams, but looking at other photographs of him I don't think was him as he was blonde with feint eyebrows, he does have a caste in his eyes like him though.   I wondered if the other man was his brother, but cannot find anything to substantiate this, looks like he was a 'brother-in-arms' only.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Charles Verity was living with his parents, John Edwin & Mary Jane Verity in the 1911 census at 

    8 Denmark Grove, Holderness Road, Hull, when he was a Messenger for a Confectioner.

  • February 25, 2018 11:35:59 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized, sepia, real photograph taken in a French photography studio in Amiens of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France 1916'.


    On their caps are the badges for the East Yorkshire Regiment, they are wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed Flags (Union Jacks?) on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers, 


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.  On the back of the postcard it says that he is with his friend George Williams, but looking at other photographs of him I don't think was him as he was blonde with feint eyebrows, he does have a caste in his eyes like him though.   I wondered if the other man was his brother, but cannot find anything to substantiate this, looks like he was a 'brother-in-arms' only.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Charles Verity was living with his parents, John Edwin & Mary Jane Verity in the 1911 census at 

    8 Denmark Grove, Holderness Road, Hull, when he was a Messenger for a Confectioner.


  • February 25, 2018 11:34:18 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized real sepia photograph taken in a studio of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France 1916'.


    On their caps are the badges for the East Yorkshire Regiment, they are wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed Flags (Union Jacks?) on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers, 


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.  On the back of the postcard it says that he is with his friend George Williams, but looking at other photographs of him I don't think was him as he was blonde with feint eyebrows, he does have a caste in his eyes like him though.   I wondered if the other man was his brother, but cannot find anything to substantiate this, looks like he was a 'brother-in-arms' only.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Charles Verity was living with his parents, John Edwin & Mary Jane Verity in the 1911 census at 

    8 Denmark Grove, Holderness Road, Hull, when he was a Messenger for a Confectioner.


  • February 25, 2018 11:33:54 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized real photograph taken in a studio of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France 1916'.


    On their caps are the badges for the East Yorkshire Regiment, they are wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed Flags (Union Jacks?) on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers, 


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.  On the back of the postcard it says that he is with his friend George Williams, but looking at other photographs of him I don't think was him as he was blonde with feint eyebrows, he does have a caste in his eyes like him though.   I wondered if the other man was his brother, but cannot find anything to substantiate this, looks like he was a 'brother-in-arms' only.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Charles Verity was living with his parents, John Edwin & Mary Jane Verity in the 1911 census at 

    8 Denmark Grove, Holderness Road, Hull, when he was a Messenger for a Confectioner.


  • February 11, 2018 12:13:00 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized real photograph taken in a studio of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France 1916'.


    On their caps are the badges for the East Yorkshire Regiment, they are wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed Flags (Union Jacks?) on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers, 


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.  On the back of the postcard it says that he is with George Williams, but I don't think it looks like him as he was blonde with feint eyebrows, he does have a caste in his eyes like him though.   I wondered if the other man was his brother, but cannot find anything to substantiate this, looks like he was a 'brother-in-arms' only.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    https://www.worldwar1postcards.com/real-photographic-ww1-postcards.php


    Local High Street Studios

    Although the large commercial companies churned out tens of thousands of RPPC's during the conflict, it was mainly local high street studios and roving photographers who were responsible for the majority of 'personalised'  ww1 real photographic cards that we see today. The images were printed directly from a negative onto photographic card with a 'postcard' back. Each image was printed by hand and usually in small numbers. For example, a portrait study of one man in uniform would merit perhaps half a dozen copies at most, which he would send to friends and relatives. Nevertheless, an image depicting a small group of men - perhaps from the same billet or unit - would obviously put a little more money into a photographers’ pocket.


    the reverse of some Real Photographic Post Cards were details of the photographer or studio that produced the card and an address. (Like the card shown above.) But having these details printed on the reverse was an extra cost and not all studios did so.

    Alternatively, information was scratched on the negative before printing - with various degrees of success. Occasionally, an embossed mark was put on the card after hand printing, or the firm’s rubber stamp was applied. Perhaps, around fifty per cent of ww1 studio and ‘street’ portrait postcards carry these details - the rest remain anonymous.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    He was living with his parents, John Edwin & Mary Jane Verity in the 1911 census at 

    8 Denmark Grove, Holderness Road, Hull, when he was a Messenger for a Confectioner.


  • February 8, 2018 12:54:56 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized real photograph taken in a studio of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France 1916'.


    On their caps are the badges for the East Yorkshire Regiment, they are wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed Flags (Union Jacks?) on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers, 


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.  I wondered if the other man was his brother, but cannot find anything to substantiate this, looks like he was a 'brother-in-arms' only.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    https://www.worldwar1postcards.com/real-photographic-ww1-postcards.php


    Local High Street Studios

    Although the large commercial companies churned out tens of thousands of RPPC's during the conflict, it was mainly local high street studios and roving photographers who were responsible for the majority of 'personalised'  ww1 real photographic cards that we see today. The images were printed directly from a negative onto photographic card with a 'postcard' back. Each image was printed by hand and usually in small numbers. For example, a portrait study of one man in uniform would merit perhaps half a dozen copies at most, which he would send to friends and relatives. Nevertheless, an image depicting a small group of men - perhaps from the same billet or unit - would obviously put a little more money into a photographers’ pocket.


    the reverse of some Real Photographic Post Cards were details of the photographer or studio that produced the card and an address. (Like the card shown above.) But having these details printed on the reverse was an extra cost and not all studios did so.

    Alternatively, information was scratched on the negative before printing - with various degrees of success. Occasionally, an embossed mark was put on the card after hand printing, or the firm’s rubber stamp was applied. Perhaps, around fifty per cent of ww1 studio and ‘street’ portrait postcards carry these details - the rest remain anonymous.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    He was living with his parents, John Edwin & Mary Jane Verity in the 1911 census at 

    8 Denmark Grove, Holderness Road, Hull, when he was a Messenger for a Confectioner.


  • February 8, 2018 12:54:31 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized real photograph taken in a studio of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France 1916'.


    On their caps are the badges for the East Yorkshire Regiment, they are wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed Flags (Union Jacks?) on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers, 


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.  I wondered if the other man was his brother, but cannot find anything to substantiate this, looks like he was a 'brother-in-arms' only.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    https://www.worldwar1postcards.com/real-photographic-ww1-postcards.php


    Local High Street Studios

    Although the large commercial companies churned out tens of thousands of RPPC's during the conflict, it was mainly local high street studios and roving photographers who were responsible for the majority of 'personalised'  ww1 real photographic cards that we see today. The images were printed directly from a negative onto photographic card with a 'postcard' back. Each image was printed by hand and usually in small numbers. For example, a portrait study of one man in uniform would merit perhaps half a dozen copies at most, which he would send to friends and relatives. Nevertheless, an image depicting a small group of men - perhaps from the same billet or unit - would obviously put a little more money into a photographers’ pocket.


    the reverse of some Real Photographic Post Cards were details of the photographer or studio that produced the card and an address. (Like the card shown above.) But having these details printed on the reverse was an extra cost and not all studios did so.

    Alternatively, information was scratched on the negative before printing - with various degrees of success. Occasionally, an embossed mark was put on the card after hand printing, or the firm’s rubber stamp was applied. Perhaps, around fifty per cent of ww1 studio and ‘street’ portrait postcards carry these details - the rest remain anonymous.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    He was living with his parents, John Edwin & Mary Jane Verity in the 1911 census at 

    8 Denmark Grove, Holderness Road, Hull, when he was a Messenger for a Confectioner.


  • February 8, 2018 12:34:18 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized real photograph taken in a studio of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France 1916'.


    On their caps are the badges for the East Yorkshire Regiment, they are wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed Union Jacks on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers, 


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.  I wondered if the other man was his brother, but cannot find anything to substantiate this, looks like he was a 'brother-in-arms' only.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    https://www.worldwar1postcards.com/real-photographic-ww1-postcards.php


    Local High Street Studios

    Although the large commercial companies churned out tens of thousands of RPPC's during the conflict, it was mainly local high street studios and roving photographers who were responsible for the majority of 'personalised'  ww1 real photographic cards that we see today. The images were printed directly from a negative onto photographic card with a 'postcard' back. Each image was printed by hand and usually in small numbers. For example, a portrait study of one man in uniform would merit perhaps half a dozen copies at most, which he would send to friends and relatives. Nevertheless, an image depicting a small group of men - perhaps from the same billet or unit - would obviously put a little more money into a photographers’ pocket.


    the reverse of some Real Photographic Post Cards were details of the photographer or studio that produced the card and an address. (Like the card shown above.) But having these details printed on the reverse was an extra cost and not all studios did so.

    Alternatively, information was scratched on the negative before printing - with various degrees of success. Occasionally, an embossed mark was put on the card after hand printing, or the firm’s rubber stamp was applied. Perhaps, around fifty per cent of ww1 studio and ‘street’ portrait postcards carry these details - the rest remain anonymous.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    He was living with his parents, John Edwin & Mary Jane Verity in the 1911 census at 

    8 Denmark Grove, Holderness Road, Hull, when he was a Messenger for a Confectioner.


  • February 8, 2018 12:30:34 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized real photograph taken in a studio of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France'.


    On their caps are the badges for the East Yorkshire Regiment, they are wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed Union Jacks on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers, 


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.  I wondered if the other man was his brother, but cannot find anything to substantiate this, looks like he was a 'brother-in-arms' only.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    https://www.worldwar1postcards.com/real-photographic-ww1-postcards.php


    Local High Street Studios

    Although the large commercial companies churned out tens of thousands of RPPC's during the conflict, it was mainly local high street studios and roving photographers who were responsible for the majority of 'personalised'  ww1 real photographic cards that we see today. The images were printed directly from a negative onto photographic card with a 'postcard' back. Each image was printed by hand and usually in small numbers. For example, a portrait study of one man in uniform would merit perhaps half a dozen copies at most, which he would send to friends and relatives. Nevertheless, an image depicting a small group of men - perhaps from the same billet or unit - would obviously put a little more money into a photographers’ pocket.


    the reverse of some Real Photographic Post Cards were details of the photographer or studio that produced the card and an address. (Like the card shown above.) But having these details printed on the reverse was an extra cost and not all studios did so.

    Alternatively, information was scratched on the negative before printing - with various degrees of success. Occasionally, an embossed mark was put on the card after hand printing, or the firm’s rubber stamp was applied. Perhaps, around fifty per cent of ww1 studio and ‘street’ portrait postcards carry these details - the rest remain anonymous.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    He was living with his parents, John Edwin & Mary Jane Verity in the 1911 census at 

    8 Denmark Grove, Holderness Road, Hull, when he was a Messenger for a Confectioner.


  • February 8, 2018 12:29:22 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized real photograph taken in a studio of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France'.


    On their caps are the badges for the East Yorkshire Regiment, they are wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed union Jacks on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers, 


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.  I wondered if the other man was his brother, but cannot find anything to substantiate this, looks like he was a 'brother-in-arms' only.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    https://www.worldwar1postcards.com/real-photographic-ww1-postcards.php


    Local High Street Studios

    Although the large commercial companies churned out tens of thousands of RPPC's during the conflict, it was mainly local high street studios and roving photographers who were responsible for the majority of 'personalised'  ww1 real photographic cards that we see today. The images were printed directly from a negative onto photographic card with a 'postcard' back. Each image was printed by hand and usually in small numbers. For example, a portrait study of one man in uniform would merit perhaps half a dozen copies at most, which he would send to friends and relatives. Nevertheless, an image depicting a small group of men - perhaps from the same billet or unit - would obviously put a little more money into a photographers’ pocket.


    the reverse of some Real Photographic Post Cards were details of the photographer or studio that produced the card and an address. (Like the card shown above.) But having these details printed on the reverse was an extra cost and not all studios did so.

    Alternatively, information was scratched on the negative before printing - with various degrees of success. Occasionally, an embossed mark was put on the card after hand printing, or the firm’s rubber stamp was applied. Perhaps, around fifty per cent of ww1 studio and ‘street’ portrait postcards carry these details - the rest remain anonymous.

    He was living with his parents, John Edwin & Mary Jane Verity in the 1911 census at 

    8 Denmark Grove, Holderness Road, Hull, when he was a Messenger for a Confectioner.


  • February 8, 2018 12:25:03 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized real photograph taken in a studio of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France'.


    On their caps are the badges for the East Yorkshire Regiment, they are wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed union Jacks on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers, 


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    https://www.worldwar1postcards.com/real-photographic-ww1-postcards.php


    Local High Street Studios

    Although the large commercial companies churned out tens of thousands of RPPC's during the conflict, it was mainly local high street studios and roving photographers who were responsible for the majority of 'personalised'  ww1 real photographic cards that we see today. The images were printed directly from a negative onto photographic card with a 'postcard' back. Each image was printed by hand and usually in small numbers. For example, a portrait study of one man in uniform would merit perhaps half a dozen copies at most, which he would send to friends and relatives. Nevertheless, an image depicting a small group of men - perhaps from the same billet or unit - would obviously put a little more money into a photographers’ pocket.


    the reverse of some Real Photographic Post Cards were details of the photographer or studio that produced the card and an address. (Like the card shown above.) But having these details printed on the reverse was an extra cost and not all studios did so.

    Alternatively, information was scratched on the negative before printing - with various degrees of success. Occasionally, an embossed mark was put on the card after hand printing, or the firm’s rubber stamp was applied. Perhaps, around fifty per cent of ww1 studio and ‘street’ portrait postcards carry these details - the rest remain anonymous.



  • February 8, 2018 12:19:55 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized real photograph taken in a studio of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France'.


    On their caps are the badges for the East Yorkshire Regiment, they are wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed union Jacks on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers, 


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.



  • February 8, 2018 12:16:33 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized studio photograph of two soldiers, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France'

    wearing puttees, both have insignia of crossed union Jacks on their left sleeves showing they are Signallers, 


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.



  • February 8, 2018 12:14:33 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized studio photograph of two soldiers wearing puttees, both have insignia showing they are Signallers (, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France'


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.



  • February 8, 2018 12:10:24 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized studio photograph, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France'


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, his Army no. was 13/267, and he was a member of a 'Pals' Regiment.


    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/east-yorkshire-regiment/


    13th (Service) Battalion (4th Hull)
    Formed in Hull on 11 August 1914 by Lord Nunburnholme and the East Riding TF Association. Commonly known as the T’Others!
    Record same as 10th Bn.
    8 February 1918 : disbanded in France.



  • February 8, 2018 12:05:29 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized studio photograph, which says on the back, 'taken near Amiens, France'


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, 13/267



  • February 8, 2018 11:59:30 Stella Watkin

    Postcard sized studio photograph, which says on the back, taken near Amiens, France


    It shows Charles Verity on the right, he was a member of the East Yorkshire Regiment, 13/267



Description

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  • 49.894067||2.295753||

    Amiens, France

Location(s)
  • Document location Amiens, France


ID
17242 / 189267
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
Brian Verity
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


1916 – 1916
  • English

  • Western Front

  • Amiens
  • Charles Verity
  • East Yorkshire Regiment
  • Hull Pals
  • signaller
  • Western Front
  • WW1



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