John Duesbery (Sherwood Foresters) killed on Somme, item 72

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COURCELETTE BRITISH CEMETERY

is half a mile south-west of the village of Courcelcuc, the sccne of very severe fighting in September 1916. The ccmeter)' was begun in November 1916 and used until March 1917. After the Armistice it was enlarged to take a considerable number of additional burials from the Courcelette and Poziercs area. It contains a total of 1967 burials, of which 1177 are unidentified, and also followed a design by Sir Herbert Baker.

DANTZIG ALLEY BRITISH CEMETERY is a little east of the village of Mametz, 8 km east of Albert. It was used by Field Ambulances and fighting units from July 1916 until the following November and additional graves were added in August and September 1918. The 183 graves which were there at the time of the Armistice were greatly increased subsequently by concentrations from certain smaller burial grounds and from battlefields north and east of Mametz. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker and now contains 2054 burials.

DELVILLE WOOD CEMETERY

has 5523 burials, all of them made after the war 3593 are unidentified. The wood itself was fiercely fought over in July and August 1916 and at the end of the war only a single tree of the original wood was left alive. The South African Brigade fought its first battle here and South Africa acquired the wood after the war and built a national memorial on the site, across the road from the cemetery, and with the same architect, Sir Herbert Baker. After the Second World War, the memorial was re-dedicated and an altar stone of Reuron marble, similar to the Commission’s Stone of Remembrance, was placed in front of the memorial, in memory of South Africans fallen in the Second World War. In 1986 a South African national military memorial museum was built behind the memorial and a visitors’ centre by the road.

FLATIRON COPSE CEMETERY

is near the village of Mametz, 6 km from Albert, and owes its existence to an Advanced Dressing Station established beside a plantation known to the British Army as Flatiron Copse. T..e cemetery was begun in July and remained in use until April 1917. A large number of graves were brought in from smaller cemeteries and surrounding battlefields after the Armistice and it now contains 1568 burials. The architect was Sir Herbert Baker.

GUARDS CEMETERY, LES HOEUFS was originally a battlefield cemetery for 40 men of the 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards who were killed on 25 September 1916. Many nv.-re bodies were brought in after the war and u now has 3136 graves, about half unidentified. This cemetery too was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

LONDON CEMETERY AND EX TENSION

is close to High Wood, which was captured by the 47ih (London) Division on 15 September 1916, and most of the original burials date from that action The original


 

London Cemetery had just 101 burials but, later on, land was acquired behind the cemetery for an extension where bodies found along the western front were buried until the 1950s, by which time the cemetery had 4039 burials, 165 of them dating from the Second World War. The majority of the 1914-1918 burials are unidentified. The cemetery was designed by the Commission’s principle architect for the Second World War cemeteries in Northern Europe, Philip Hepworth.

NORFOLK CEMETERY

just east of Albert, was begun by the 1st Norfolks in August 1915 and used by other units until August 1916. It was nearly doubled in size after the Armistice by concentrations from adjacent battlefields, and now contains 549 burials. The architect was Sir Herbert Baker. OVILLERS MILITARY CEMETERY is situated within what was No Man’s Land prior to 1 July 1916, and was also designed by Sir Herbert Baker. The first burials were made soon after the start of the battle, but most of the 3556 burials were made after the end of the war, and 2477 are unidentified.

POZIERES BRITISH CEMETERY is named alter a village on the north-west side of the straight main road from Albert to Bapaume, taken by the 1st Australian and 48th (South Midland) Divisions in July 1916, lost in March 1918 and recaptured by the 17th Division in the following August. It contains original burials from 1916, 1917 and 1918, plus graves concentrated there after the Armistice from surrounding battlefields. The cemetery was designed by William Cowlishaw and contains 2754 burials, 1374 are unidentified.

QUARRY CEMETERY

was begun at an Advanced Dressing Station in July 1916 and used until February 1917. It takes its name from a disused quarry north of the village of Montauban, lOkms cast of Albert. Additional burials were concentrated there from surrounding battlefields and burial grounds after the Armistice and the total number of graves is now 740. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

SERRE ROAD CEMETERY NO,2

is the largest Commonwealth cemetery on the Somme, and fourth largest in France. Its 7139 graves arc arranged in 41 plots rising up the slope of the Redan Ridge. The majoritiy of the graves arc not identified and were brought here after the war, but the original burials were made in 1917 and are in plots 1 & 2 behind the Stone of Remembrance. The architect was Sir Edwin Lutyens and the cemeierv was completed in 1934.

WARLENCOURT BRITISH CEMETERY

is just outside the 1916 battlefield area but it includes the graves of men who died in the later stages of the battle whose graves were brought in after the end of the war from the surrounding area. It has 3507 graves (1823 unidentified) and the architect was again Sir Edwin Lutvcns.

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COURCELETTE BRITISH CEMETERY

is half a mile south-west of the village of Courcelcuc, the sccne of very severe fighting in September 1916. The ccmeter)' was begun in November 1916 and used until March 1917. After the Armistice it was enlarged to take a considerable number of additional burials from the Courcelette and Poziercs area. It contains a total of 1967 burials, of which 1177 are unidentified, and also followed a design by Sir Herbert Baker.

DANTZIG ALLEY BRITISH CEMETERY is a little east of the village of Mametz, 8 km east of Albert. It was used by Field Ambulances and fighting units from July 1916 until the following November and additional graves were added in August and September 1918. The 183 graves which were there at the time of the Armistice were greatly increased subsequently by concentrations from certain smaller burial grounds and from battlefields north and east of Mametz. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker and now contains 2054 burials.

DELVILLE WOOD CEMETERY

has 5523 burials, all of them made after the war 3593 are unidentified. The wood itself was fiercely fought over in July and August 1916 and at the end of the war only a single tree of the original wood was left alive. The South African Brigade fought its first battle here and South Africa acquired the wood after the war and built a national memorial on the site, across the road from the cemetery, and with the same architect, Sir Herbert Baker. After the Second World War, the memorial was re-dedicated and an altar stone of Reuron marble, similar to the Commission’s Stone of Remembrance, was placed in front of the memorial, in memory of South Africans fallen in the Second World War. In 1986 a South African national military memorial museum was built behind the memorial and a visitors’ centre by the road.

FLATIRON COPSE CEMETERY

is near the village of Mametz, 6 km from Albert, and owes its existence to an Advanced Dressing Station established beside a plantation known to the British Army as Flatiron Copse. T..e cemetery was begun in July and remained in use until April 1917. A large number of graves were brought in from smaller cemeteries and surrounding battlefields after the Armistice and it now contains 1568 burials. The architect was Sir Herbert Baker.

GUARDS CEMETERY, LES HOEUFS was originally a battlefield cemetery for 40 men of the 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards who were killed on 25 September 1916. Many nv.-re bodies were brought in after the war and u now has 3136 graves, about half unidentified. This cemetery too was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

LONDON CEMETERY AND EX TENSION

is close to High Wood, which was captured by the 47ih (London) Division on 15 September 1916, and most of the original burials date from that action The original


 

London Cemetery had just 101 burials but, later on, land was acquired behind the cemetery for an extension where bodies found along the western front were buried until the 1950s, by which time the cemetery had 4039 burials, 165 of them dating from the Second World War. The majority of the 1914-1918 burials are unidentified. The cemetery was designed by the Commission’s principle architect for the Second World War cemeteries in Northern Europe, Philip Hepworth.

NORFOLK CEMETERY

just east of Albert, was begun by the 1st Norfolks in August 1915 and used by other units until August 1916. It was nearly doubled in size after the Armistice by concentrations from adjacent battlefields, and now contains 549 burials. The architect was Sir Herbert Baker. OVILLERS MILITARY CEMETERY is situated within what was No Man’s Land prior to 1 July 1916, and was also designed by Sir Herbert Baker. The first burials were made soon after the start of the battle, but most of the 3556 burials were made after the end of the war, and 2477 are unidentified.

POZIERES BRITISH CEMETERY is named alter a village on the north-west side of the straight main road from Albert to Bapaume, taken by the 1st Australian and 48th (South Midland) Divisions in July 1916, lost in March 1918 and recaptured by the 17th Division in the following August. It contains original burials from 1916, 1917 and 1918, plus graves concentrated there after the Armistice from surrounding battlefields. The cemetery was designed by William Cowlishaw and contains 2754 burials, 1374 are unidentified.

QUARRY CEMETERY

was begun at an Advanced Dressing Station in July 1916 and used until February 1917. It takes its name from a disused quarry north of the village of Montauban, lOkms cast of Albert. Additional burials were concentrated there from surrounding battlefields and burial grounds after the Armistice and the total number of graves is now 740. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

SERRE ROAD CEMETERY NO,2

is the largest Commonwealth cemetery on the Somme, and fourth largest in France. Its 7139 graves arc arranged in 41 plots rising up the slope of the Redan Ridge. The majoritiy of the graves arc not identified and were brought here after the war, but the original burials were made in 1917 and are in plots 1 & 2 behind the Stone of Remembrance. The architect was Sir Edwin Lutyens and the cemeierv was completed in 1934.

WARLENCOURT BRITISH CEMETERY

is just outside the 1916 battlefield area but it includes the graves of men who died in the later stages of the battle whose graves were brought in after the end of the war from the surrounding area. It has 3507 graves (1823 unidentified) and the architect was again Sir Edwin Lutvcns.


Transcription history
  • November 1, 2018 10:44:34 Zafiro Marti

    COURCELETTE BRITISH CEMETERY

    is half a mile south-west of the village of Courcelcuc, the sccne of very severe fighting in September 1916. The ccmeter)' was begun in November 1916 and used until March 1917. After the Armistice it was enlarged to take a considerable number of additional burials from the Courcelette and Poziercs area. It contains a total of 1967 burials, of which 1177 are unidentified, and also followed a design by Sir Herbert Baker.

    DANTZIG ALLEY BRITISH CEMETERY is a little east of the village of Mametz, 8 km east of Albert. It was used by Field Ambulances and fighting units from July 1916 until the following November and additional graves were added in August and September 1918. The 183 graves which were there at the time of the Armistice were greatly increased subsequently by concentrations from certain smaller burial grounds and from battlefields north and east of Mametz. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker and now contains 2054 burials.

    DELVILLE WOOD CEMETERY

    has 5523 burials, all of them made after the war 3593 are unidentified. The wood itself was fiercely fought over in July and August 1916 and at the end of the war only a single tree of the original wood was left alive. The South African Brigade fought its first battle here and South Africa acquired the wood after the war and built a national memorial on the site, across the road from the cemetery, and with the same architect, Sir Herbert Baker. After the Second World War, the memorial was re-dedicated and an altar stone of Reuron marble, similar to the Commission’s Stone of Remembrance, was placed in front of the memorial, in memory of South Africans fallen in the Second World War. In 1986 a South African national military memorial museum was built behind the memorial and a visitors’ centre by the road.

    FLATIRON COPSE CEMETERY

    is near the village of Mametz, 6 km from Albert, and owes its existence to an Advanced Dressing Station established beside a plantation known to the British Army as Flatiron Copse. T..e cemetery was begun in July and remained in use until April 1917. A large number of graves were brought in from smaller cemeteries and surrounding battlefields after the Armistice and it now contains 1568 burials. The architect was Sir Herbert Baker.

    GUARDS CEMETERY, LES HOEUFS was originally a battlefield cemetery for 40 men of the 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards who were killed on 25 September 1916. Many nv.-re bodies were brought in after the war and u now has 3136 graves, about half unidentified. This cemetery too was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

    LONDON CEMETERY AND EX TENSION

    is close to High Wood, which was captured by the 47ih (London) Division on 15 September 1916, and most of the original burials date from that action The original


     

    London Cemetery had just 101 burials but, later on, land was acquired behind the cemetery for an extension where bodies found along the western front were buried until the 1950s, by which time the cemetery had 4039 burials, 165 of them dating from the Second World War. The majority of the 1914-1918 burials are unidentified. The cemetery was designed by the Commission’s principle architect for the Second World War cemeteries in Northern Europe, Philip Hepworth.

    NORFOLK CEMETERY

    just east of Albert, was begun by the 1st Norfolks in August 1915 and used by other units until August 1916. It was nearly doubled in size after the Armistice by concentrations from adjacent battlefields, and now contains 549 burials. The architect was Sir Herbert Baker. OVILLERS MILITARY CEMETERY is situated within what was No Man’s Land prior to 1 July 1916, and was also designed by Sir Herbert Baker. The first burials were made soon after the start of the battle, but most of the 3556 burials were made after the end of the war, and 2477 are unidentified.

    POZIERES BRITISH CEMETERY is named alter a village on the north-west side of the straight main road from Albert to Bapaume, taken by the 1st Australian and 48th (South Midland) Divisions in July 1916, lost in March 1918 and recaptured by the 17th Division in the following August. It contains original burials from 1916, 1917 and 1918, plus graves concentrated there after the Armistice from surrounding battlefields. The cemetery was designed by William Cowlishaw and contains 2754 burials, 1374 are unidentified.

    QUARRY CEMETERY

    was begun at an Advanced Dressing Station in July 1916 and used until February 1917. It takes its name from a disused quarry north of the village of Montauban, lOkms cast of Albert. Additional burials were concentrated there from surrounding battlefields and burial grounds after the Armistice and the total number of graves is now 740. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

    SERRE ROAD CEMETERY NO,2

    is the largest Commonwealth cemetery on the Somme, and fourth largest in France. Its 7139 graves arc arranged in 41 plots rising up the slope of the Redan Ridge. The majoritiy of the graves arc not identified and were brought here after the war, but the original burials were made in 1917 and are in plots 1 & 2 behind the Stone of Remembrance. The architect was Sir Edwin Lutyens and the cemeierv was completed in 1934.

    WARLENCOURT BRITISH CEMETERY

    is just outside the 1916 battlefield area but it includes the graves of men who died in the later stages of the battle whose graves were brought in after the end of the war from the surrounding area. It has 3507 graves (1823 unidentified) and the architect was again Sir Edwin Lutvcns.

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    Location(s)


    ID
    17050 / 201644
    Source
    http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
    Contributor
    Kenneth Duesbery, great nephew of John
    License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



    • Western Front

    • Artillery
    • Home Front
    • Remembrance
    • Trench Life



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