John Duesbery (Sherwood Foresters) killed on Somme, item 46

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right column part of the title 'ist, 16 Bridge St., GOOLE.'

.left column BATTLES


John Duesbury of

is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

and has been at the front since March 3rd.

He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin_

ning of August, and the vessel had some

difficultly to get away.  However, they left

the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

when they arrived at Goole the boat was

laid up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

missingnd , when he enlisted, and was sent to

Plymouth for training.  In five months he

was in the firing line. After being at the

front just a week, he joined in the battle of

Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

at the start, came out with only 400 men.

Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

me to get safely out of it. No one can

missing by reading what a battlefield is like:

 not until they see it with their own eyes.

can they realise the real thing.  In the 

trenches we took before we took the village,

the Germans had feather beds, pots and

pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

women's clothes were found in their dug-

outs. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

who were wounded, and the stretcher-

bearers who were attending to them, get-

ting blown to pieces by the German artil-

ery as they were going to the first-said

station.  I came out of it safe and well, 

and we had a week's rest to get put up to

our proper strength again.  We lost 700

men and all our officers except two.  We

were inspected by Field-Marshal General

missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

good word for the gallant work we had

done. After that we started going into the

trenches again - three days in and three

days out; but we shifted a little further

up the line into some fresh trenches, and

we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

for an attack made on the 9th May. We

were told two days before the charge was

made what we had to take, and we had a 

.the text continues on the right column.

week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

We went into the trenches on Saturday

night, as the bombardment was due to com-

mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

Our artillery shelled their trenches for

half an hour, breaking them up, and then

we made a charge, and they started with

their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

vanced in the face of a shower of bullets,

and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

and advance about five miles.  We lost

heavily, but nothing compared with them.

We lost most of our men from their artil-

ery firing into our trenches and stopping

our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

our wounded going out and stretcher

bearers were killed.  Our generals said they 

never saw men so cool under shell fire as

we were. Our regiment lost about half the

battalion and six officers. I am thankful to

say I got safely out of this engagement too.

I can account for putting a few of the

brutes out of actions. I have not seen any

of the Goole Territorials yet, but I know

they will do their bit when called upon. All

my mates are in the K.O.Y.L.I; but they

are good lads in the Sherwood Foresters,

too''. 

                   GENERAL NUGENT

Brigadier-General O.S.W. Nugent,

D.S.O., P.S.C., aide-de-camp to the King,

who has been in command of the troops on

the Humber Defences since the beginning

of the war, has been promoted to brigade

command.  He is an old regimental officer

of the King's Royal Riffles with 33 years'

experience, and commanded the 4th 

Battalion.

.the paragraph below is another article.

Spasmodio advertising is about as useful

as a few little thunderstorms during a long

drought. - Advt.

  The Yorkshire Dialect Society held its

spring meeting at the Guidhall, York, on

Saturday.  The Lord Mayor attended, and

gave the society a civic welcome. Mr. G. H.

Cowling, of Leeds, contributed a paper em-

bodying the results of his inquiry as to the

dialects of the dales around Scarborough.

Subsequent speakers included Mr. S.P.

Unwin and Professor Moorman. 


Transcription saved

right column part of the title 'ist, 16 Bridge St., GOOLE.'

.left column BATTLES


John Duesbury of

is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

and has been at the front since March 3rd.

He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin_

ning of August, and the vessel had some

difficultly to get away.  However, they left

the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

when they arrived at Goole the boat was

laid up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

missingnd , when he enlisted, and was sent to

Plymouth for training.  In five months he

was in the firing line. After being at the

front just a week, he joined in the battle of

Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

at the start, came out with only 400 men.

Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

me to get safely out of it. No one can

missing by reading what a battlefield is like:

 not until they see it with their own eyes.

can they realise the real thing.  In the 

trenches we took before we took the village,

the Germans had feather beds, pots and

pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

women's clothes were found in their dug-

outs. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

who were wounded, and the stretcher-

bearers who were attending to them, get-

ting blown to pieces by the German artil-

ery as they were going to the first-said

station.  I came out of it safe and well, 

and we had a week's rest to get put up to

our proper strength again.  We lost 700

men and all our officers except two.  We

were inspected by Field-Marshal General

missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

good word for the gallant work we had

done. After that we started going into the

trenches again - three days in and three

days out; but we shifted a little further

up the line into some fresh trenches, and

we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

for an attack made on the 9th May. We

were told two days before the charge was

made what we had to take, and we had a 

.the text continues on the right column.

week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

We went into the trenches on Saturday

night, as the bombardment was due to com-

mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

Our artillery shelled their trenches for

half an hour, breaking them up, and then

we made a charge, and they started with

their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

vanced in the face of a shower of bullets,

and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

and advance about five miles.  We lost

heavily, but nothing compared with them.

We lost most of our men from their artil-

ery firing into our trenches and stopping

our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

our wounded going out and stretcher

bearers were killed.  Our generals said they 

never saw men so cool under shell fire as

we were. Our regiment lost about half the

battalion and six officers. I am thankful to

say I got safely out of this engagement too.

I can account for putting a few of the

brutes out of actions. I have not seen any

of the Goole Territorials yet, but I know

they will do their bit when called upon. All

my mates are in the K.O.Y.L.I; but they

are good lads in the Sherwood Foresters,

too''. 

                   GENERAL NUGENT

Brigadier-General O.S.W. Nugent,

D.S.O., P.S.C., aide-de-camp to the King,

who has been in command of the troops on

the Humber Defences since the beginning

of the war, has been promoted to brigade

command.  He is an old regimental officer

of the King's Royal Riffles with 33 years'

experience, and commanded the 4th 

Battalion.

.the paragraph below is another article.

Spasmodio advertising is about as useful

as a few little thunderstorms during a long

drought. - Advt.

  The Yorkshire Dialect Society held its

spring meeting at the Guidhall, York, on

Saturday.  The Lord Mayor attended, and

gave the society a civic welcome. Mr. G. H.

Cowling, of Leeds, contributed a paper em-

bodying the results of his inquiry as to the

dialects of the dales around Scarborough.

Subsequent speakers included Mr. S.P.

Unwin and Professor Moorman. 



Transcription history
  • September 21, 2019 17:40:55 Julia Bourbois

    right column part of the title 'ist, 16 Bridge St., GOOLE.'

    .left column BATTLES


    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rd.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin_

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    laid up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingnd , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    at the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missing by reading what a battlefield is like:

     not until they see it with their own eyes.

    can they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    outs. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    ting blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    station.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    done. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    made what we had to take, and we had a 

    .the text continues on the right column.

    week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

    We went into the trenches on Saturday

    night, as the bombardment was due to com-

    mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

    Our artillery shelled their trenches for

    half an hour, breaking them up, and then

    we made a charge, and they started with

    their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

    vanced in the face of a shower of bullets,

    and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

    and advance about five miles.  We lost

    heavily, but nothing compared with them.

    We lost most of our men from their artil-

    ery firing into our trenches and stopping

    our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

    our wounded going out and stretcher

    bearers were killed.  Our generals said they 

    never saw men so cool under shell fire as

    we were. Our regiment lost about half the

    battalion and six officers. I am thankful to

    say I got safely out of this engagement too.

    I can account for putting a few of the

    brutes out of actions. I have not seen any

    of the Goole Territorials yet, but I know

    they will do their bit when called upon. All

    my mates are in the K.O.Y.L.I; but they

    are good lads in the Sherwood Foresters,

    too''. 

                       GENERAL NUGENT

    Brigadier-General O.S.W. Nugent,

    D.S.O., P.S.C., aide-de-camp to the King,

    who has been in command of the troops on

    the Humber Defences since the beginning

    of the war, has been promoted to brigade

    command.  He is an old regimental officer

    of the King's Royal Riffles with 33 years'

    experience, and commanded the 4th 

    Battalion.

    .the paragraph below is another article.

    Spasmodio advertising is about as useful

    as a few little thunderstorms during a long

    drought. - Advt.

      The Yorkshire Dialect Society held its

    spring meeting at the Guidhall, York, on

    Saturday.  The Lord Mayor attended, and

    gave the society a civic welcome. Mr. G. H.

    Cowling, of Leeds, contributed a paper em-

    bodying the results of his inquiry as to the

    dialects of the dales around Scarborough.

    Subsequent speakers included Mr. S.P.

    Unwin and Professor Moorman. 


  • August 31, 2019 20:54:30 Julia Bourbois

    right column part of the title 'ist 16 Bridge St., GOOLE.'

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rd.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    missingning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    laid up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingnd , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    at the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missing by reading what a battlefield is like:

     not until they see it with their own eyes.

    can they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    outs. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    ting blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    station.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    done. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    made what we had to take, and we had a 

    .the text continues on the right column.

    week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

    We went into the trenches on Saturday

    night, as the bombardment was due to com-

    mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

    Our artillery shelled their trenches from

    half an hour, breaking them up, and then

    we made a charge, and they started with

    their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

    vanced in the face of a shower of bullets,

    and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

    and advance about five miles.  We lost

    heavily, but nothing compared with them.

    We lost most of our men from their artil-

    ery firing into our trenches and stopping

    our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

    our wounded going out and stretcher

    bearers were killed.  Our generals said they 

    never saw men so cool under shell fire as

    we were. Our regiment lost about half the

    battalion and six officers. I am thankful to

    say I got safely out of this engagement too.

    I can account for putting a few of the

    brutes out of actions. I have not seen any

    of the Goole Territorials yet, but I know

    they will do their bit when called upon. All

    my mates are in the K.O.Y.L.I; but they

    are good lads in the Sherwood Foresters,

    too''. 

                       GENERAL NUGENT

    Brigadier-General O.S.W. Nugent,

    D.S.O., P.S.C., aide-de-camp to the King,

    who has been in command of the troops on

    the Humber Defences since the beginning

    of the war, has been promoted to brigade

    command.  He is an old regimental officer

    of the King's Royal Riffles with 33 years'

    experience, and commanded the 4th 

    Battalion.

    .the paragraph below is another article.

    Spamodio advertising is about as useful

    as a few little thunderstorms during a long

    drought. - Advt.

      The Yorkshire Dialect Society held its

    spring meeting at the Guidhall, York, on

    Saturday.  The Lord Mayor attended, and

    gave the society a civic welcome. Mr. G. H.

    Cowling, of Leeds, contributed a paper em-

    bodying the results of his inquiry as to the

    dialects of the dales around Scarborough.

    Subsequent speakers included Mr. S.P.

    Unwin and Professor Moorman. 



  • August 31, 2019 20:54:20 Julia Bourbois

    right column part of the title 'ist 16 Bridge St., GOOLE.'

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rd.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    missingning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    laid up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingnd , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    at the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missing by reading what a battlefield is like:

     not until they see it with their own eyes.

    can they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    outs. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    ting blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    station.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    done. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    made what we had to take, and we had a 

    .the text continues on the right column.

    week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

    We went into the trenches on Saturday

    night, as the bombardment was due to com-

    mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

    Our artillery shelled their trenches from

    half an hour, breaking them up, and then

    we made a charge, and they started with

    their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

    vanced in the face of a shower of bullets,

    and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

    and advance about five miles.  We lost

    heavily, but nothing compared with them.

    We lost most of our men from their artil-

    ery firing into our trenches and stopping

    our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

    our wounded going out and stretcher

    bearers were killed.  Our generals said they 

    never saw men so cool under shell fire as

    we were. Our regiment lost about half the

    battalion and six officers. I am thankful to

    say I got safely out of this engagement too.

    I can account for putting a few of the

    brutes out of actions. I have not seen any

    of the Goole Territorials yet, but I know

    they will do their bit when called upon. All

    my mates are in the K.O.Y.L.I; but they

    are good lads in the Sherwood Foresters,

    too''. 

                       GENERAL NUGENT

    Brigadier-General O.S.W. Nugent,

    D.S.O., P.S.C., aide-de-camp to the King,

    who has been in command of the troops on

    the Humber Defences since the beginning

    of the war, has been promoted to brigade

    command.  He is an old regimental officer

    of the King's Royal Riffles with 33 years'

    experience, and commanded the 4th 

    Battalion.

    .the paragraph below is another article.

    Spamodio advertising is about as useful

    as a few little thunderstorms during a long

    droung. - Advt.

      The Yorkshire Dialect Society held its

    spring meeting at the Guidhall, York, on

    Saturday.  The Lord Mayor attended, and

    gave the society a civic welcome. Mr. G. H.

    Cowling, of Leeds, contributed a paper em-

    bodying the results of his inquiry as to the

    dialects of the dales around Scarborough.

    Subsequent speakers included Mr. S.P.

    Unwin and Professor Moorman. 



  • November 1, 2018 13:22:49 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    right column part of the title 'ist 16 Bridge St., GOOLE.'

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    missingning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    missingne. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    missingade what we had to take, and wemissing

    .the text continues on the right column.

    week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

    We went into the trenches on Saturday

    night, as the bombardment was due to com-

    mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

    Our artillery shelled their trenches from

    half an hour, breaking them up, and then

    we made a charge, and they started with

    their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

    venced in the face of a shower of bullets,

    and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

    and advance about five miles.  We lost

    heavily, but nothing compared with them.

    We lost most of our men from their artil-

    ery firing into our trenches and stopping

    our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

    our wounded going out and stretcher

    hearers were killed.  Our generals said they 

    never saw men so cool under shell fire as

    we were. Our regiment lost about half the

    battalion and six officers. I am thankful to

    say I got safely out of this engagement too.

    I can account for putting a few of the

    brutes out of actions. I have not seen any

    of the Goole Territorials yet, but I know

    they will do their bit when called upon. All

    my mates are in the K.O.Y.L.I; but they

    are good lads in the Sherwood Foresters,

    too''. 

                       GENERAL NUGENT

    Brigadier-General O.S.W. Nugent,

    D.S.O., P.S.C., aide-de-camp to the King,

    who has been in command of the troops on

    the Humber Defences since the beginning

    of the war, has been promoted to brigade

    command.  He is an old regimental officer

    of the King's Royal Riffles with 33 years'

    experience, and commanded the 4th 

    Battalion.

    .the paragraph below is another article.

    Spamodio advertising is about as useful

    as a few little thunderstorms during a long

    droung. - Advt.

      The Yorkshire Dialect Society held its

    spring meeting at the Guidhall, York, on

    Saturday.  The Lord Mayor attended, and

    gave the society a civic welcome. Mr. G. H.

    Cowling, of Leeds, contributed a paper em-

    bodying the results of his inquiry as to the

    dialects of the dales around Scarborough.

    Subsequent speakers included Mr. S.P.

    Unwin and Professor Moorman. 



  • November 1, 2018 11:45:24 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    right column part of the title 'ist 16 Bridge St., GOOLE.'

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    missingne. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    missingade what we had to take, and wemissing

    .the text continues on the right column.

    week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

    We went into the trenches on Saturday

    night, as the bombardment was due to com-

    mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

    Our artillery shelled their trenches from

    half an hour, breaking them up, and then

    we made a charge, and they started with

    their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

    venced in the face of a shower of bullets,

    and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

    and advance about five miles.  We lost

    heavily, but nothing compared with them.

    We lost most of our men from their artil-

    ery firing into our trenches and stopping

    our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

    our wounded going out and stretcher

    hearers were killed.  Our generals said they 

    never saw men so cool under shell fire as

    we were. Our regiment lost about half the

    battalion and six officers. I am thankful to

    say I got safely out of this engagement too.

    I can account for putting a few of the

    brutes out of actions. I have not seen any

    of the Goole Territorials yet, but I know

    they will do their bit when called upon. All

    my mates are in the K.O.Y.L.I; but they

    are good lads in the Sherwood Foresters,

    too''. 

                       GENERAL NUGENT

    Brigadier-General O.S.W. Nugent,

    D.S.O., P.S.C., aide-de-camp to the King,

    who has been in command of the troops on

    the Humber Defences since the beginning

    of the war, has been promoted to brigade

    command.  He is an old regimental officer

    of the King's Royal Riffles with 33 years'

    experience, and commanded the 4th 

    Battalion.

    .the paragraph below is another article.

    Spamodio advertising is about as useful

    as a few little thunderstorms during a long

    droung. - Advt.

      The Yorkshire Dialect Society held its

    spring meeting at the Guidhall, York, on

    Saturday.  The Lord Mayor attended, and

    gave the society a civic welcome. Mr. G. H.

    Cowling, of Leeds, contributed a paper em-

    bodying the results of his inquiry as to the

    dialects of the dales around Scarborough.

    Subsequent speakers included Mr. S.P.

    Unwin and Professor Moorman. 



  • November 1, 2018 11:43:48 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    missingne. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    missingade what we had to take, and wemissing

    .the text continues on the right column.

    week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

    We went into the trenches on Saturday

    night, as the bombardment was due to com-

    mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

    Our artillery shelled their trenches from

    half an hour, breaking them up, and then

    we made a charge, and they started with

    their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

    venced in the face of a shower of bullets,

    and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

    and advance about five miles.  We lost

    heavily, but nothing compared with them.

    We lost most of our men from their artil-

    ery firing into our trenches and stopping

    our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

    our wounded going out and stretcher

    hearers were killed.  Our generals said they 

    never saw men so cool under shell fire as

    we were. Our regiment lost about half the

    battalion and six officers. I am thankful to

    say I got safely out of this engagement too.

    I can account for putting a few of the

    brutes out of actions. I have not seen any

    of the Goole Territorials yet, but I know

    they will do their bit when called upon. All

    my mates are in the K.O.Y.L.I; but they

    are good lads in the Sherwood Foresters,

    too''. 

                       GENERAL NUGENT

    Brigadier-General O.S.W. Nugent,

    D.S.O., P.S.C., aide-de-camp to the King,

    who has been in command of the troops on

    the Humber Defences since the beginning

    of the war, has been promoted to brigade

    command.  He is an old regimental officer

    of the King's Royal Riffles with 33 years'

    experience, and commanded the 4th 

    Battalion.

    .the paragraph below is another article.

    Spamodio advertising is about as useful

    as a few little thunderstorms during a long

    droung. - Advt.

      The Yorkshire Dialect Society held its

    spring meeting at the Guidhall, York, on

    Saturday.  The Lord Mayor attended, and

    gave the society a civic welcome. Mr. G. H.

    Cowling, of Leeds, contributed a paper em-

    bodying the results of his inquiry as to the

    dialects of the dales around Scarborough.

    Subsequent speakers included Mr. S.P.

    Unwin and Professor Moorman. 



  • November 1, 2018 11:43:37 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    missingne. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    missingade what we had to take, and wemissing

    .the text continues on the  column.

    week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

    We went into the trenches on Saturday

    night, as the bombardment was due to com-

    mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

    Our artillery shelled their trenches from

    half an hour, breaking them up, and then

    we made a charge, and they started with

    their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

    venced in the face of a shower of bullets,

    and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

    and advance about five miles.  We lost

    heavily, but nothing compared with them.

    We lost most of our men from their artil-

    ery firing into our trenches and stopping

    our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

    our wounded going out and stretcher

    hearers were killed.  Our generals said they 

    never saw men so cool under shell fire as

    we were. Our regiment lost about half the

    battalion and six officers. I am thankful to

    say I got safely out of this engagement too.

    I can account for putting a few of the

    brutes out of actions. I have not seen any

    of the Goole Territorials yet, but I know

    they will do their bit when called upon. All

    my mates are in the K.O.Y.L.I; but they

    are good lads in the Sherwood Foresters,

    too''. 

                       GENERAL NUGENT

    Brigadier-General O.S.W. Nugent,

    D.S.O., P.S.C., aide-de-camp to the King,

    who has been in command of the troops on

    the Humber Defences since the beginning

    of the war, has been promoted to brigade

    command.  He is an old regimental officer

    of the King's Royal Riffles with 33 years'

    experience, and commanded the 4th 

    Battalion.

    .the paragraph below is another article.

    Spamodio advertising is about as useful

    as a few little thunderstorms during a long

    droung. - Advt.

      The Yorkshire Dialect Society held its

    spring meeting at the Guidhall, York, on

    Saturday.  The Lord Mayor attended, and

    gave the society a civic welcome. Mr. G. H.

    Cowling, of Leeds, contributed a paper em-

    bodying the results of his inquiry as to the

    dialects of the dales around Scarborough.

    Subsequent speakers included Mr. S.P.

    Unwin and Professor Moorman. 



  • November 1, 2018 11:43:13 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    missingne. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    missingade what we had to take, and wemissing

    .the text continues on the left column.

    week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

    We went into the trenches on Saturday

    night, as the bombardment was due to com-

    mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

    Our artillery shelled their trenches from

    half an hour, breaking them up, and then

    we made a charge, and they started with

    their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

    venced in the face of a shower of bullets,

    and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

    and advance about five miles.  We lost

    heavily, but nothing compared with them.

    We lost most of our men from their artil-

    ery firing into our trenches and stopping

    our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

    our wounded going out and stretcher

    hearers were killed.  Our generals said they 

    never saw men so cool under shell fire as

    we were. Our regiment lost about half the

    battalion and six officers. I am thankful to

    say I got safely out of this engagement too.

    I can account for putting a few of the

    brutes out of actions. I have not seen any

    of the Goole Territorials yet, but I know

    they will do their bit when called upon. All

    my mates are in the K.O.Y.L.I; but they

    are good lads in the Sherwood Foresters,

    too''. 

                       GENERAL NUGENT

    Brigadier-General O.S.W. Nugent,

    D.S.O., P.S.C., aide-de-camp to the King,

    who has been in command of the troops on

    the Humber Defences since the beginning

    of the war, has been promoted to brigade

    command.  He is an old regimental officer

    of the King's Royal Riffles with 33 years'

    experience, and commanded the 4th 

    Battalion.

    .the paragraph below is another article.

    Spamodio advertising is about as useful

    as a few little thunderstorms during a long

    droung. - Advt.

      The Yorkshire Dialect Society held its

    spring meeting at the Guidhall, York, on

    Saturday.  The Lord Mayor attended, and

    gave the society a civic welcome. Mr. G. H.

    Cowling, of Leeds, contributed a paper em-

    bodying the results of his inquiry as to the

    dialects of the dales around Scarborough.

    Subsequent speakers included Mr. S.P.

    Unwin and Professor Moorman. 



  • November 1, 2018 11:39:35 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    missingne. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    missingade what we had to take, and wemissing

    .the text continues on the left column.

    week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

    We went into the trenches on Saturday

    night, as the bombardment was due to com-

    mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

    Our artillery shelled their trenches from

    half an hour, breaking them up, and then

    we made a charge, and they started with

    their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

    venced in the face of a shower of bullets,

    and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

    and advance about five miles.  We lost

    heavily, but nothing compared with them.

    We lost most of our men from their artil-

    ery firing into our trenches and stopping

    our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

    our wounded going out and stretcher

    hearers were killed.  Our generals said they 

    never saw men so cool under shell fire as

    we were. Our regiment lost about half the

    battalion and six officers. I am thankful to

    say I got safely out of this engagement too.

    I can account for putting a few of the

    brutes out of actions. I have not seen any

    of the Goole Territorials yet, but I know

    they will do their bit when called upon. All

    my mates are in the K.O.Y.L.I; but they

    are good lads in the Sherwood Foresters,

    too''. 

                       GENERAL NUGENT

    Brigadier-General O.S.W. Nugent,

    D.S.O., P.S.C., aide-de-camp to the King,

    who has been in command of the troops on

    the Humber Defences since the beginning

    of the war, has been promoted to brigade

    command.  He is an old regimental officer

    of the King's Royal Riffles with 33 years'

    experience, and commanded the 4th 

    Battalion.

    ___________________________________________

    Spamodio advertising is about 



  • November 1, 2018 11:39:22 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    missingne. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    missingade what we had to take, and wemissing

    .the text continues on the left column.

    week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

    We went into the trenches on Saturday

    night, as the bombardment was due to com-

    mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

    Our artillery shelled their trenches from

    half an hour, breaking them up, and then

    we made a charge, and they started with

    their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

    venced in the face of a shower of bullets,

    and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

    and advance about five miles.  We lost

    heavily, but nothing compared with them.

    We lost most of our men from their artil-

    ery firing into our trenches and stopping

    our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

    our wounded going out and stretcher

    hearers were killed.  Our generals said they 

    never saw men so cool under shell fire as

    we were. Our regiment lost about half the

    battalion and six officers. I am thankful to

    say I got safely out of this engagement too.

    I can account for putting a few of the

    brutes out of actions. I have not seen any

    of the Goole Territorials yet, but I know

    they will do their bit when called upon. All

    my mates are in the K.O.Y.L.I; but they

    are good lads in the Sherwood Foresters,

    too''. 

                       GENERAL NUGENT

    Brigadier-General O.S.W. Nugent,

    D.S.O., P.S.C., aide-de-camp to the King,

    who has been in command of the troops on

    the Humber Defences since the beginning

    of the war, has been promoted to brigade

    command.  He is an old regimental officer

    of the King's Royal Riffles with 33 years'

    experience, and commanded the 4th 

    Battalion.


    Spamodio advertising is about 



  • November 1, 2018 11:35:36 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    missingne. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    missingade what we had to take, and wemissing

    .the text continues on the left column.

    week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

    We went into the trenches on Saturday

    night, as the bombardment was due to com-

    mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

    Our artillery shelled their trenches from

    half an hour, breaking them up, and then

    we made a charge, and they started with

    their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

    venced in the face of a shower of bullets,

    and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

    and advance about five miles.  We lost

    heavily, but nothing compared with them.

    We lost most of our men from their artil-

    ery firing into our trenches and stopping

    our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

    our wounded going out and stretcher

    hearers were killed.  Our generals said they 

    never saw men so cool under shell fire as

    we were. Our regiment lost about half the

    battalion and six officers. I am thankful to

    say I got safely out of this engagement too.

    I can account for putting a few of the

    brutes out of actions. I have not seen any

    of the Goole Territorials yet, but I know

    they will do their bit when called upon. All

    my mates are in the K.O.Y.L.I; but they

    are good lads in the Sherwood Foresters,

    too''. 



  • November 1, 2018 11:34:38 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    missingne. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    missingade what we had to take, and wemissing

    .the text continues on the left column.

    week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

    We went into the trenches on Saturday

    night, as the bombardment was due to com-

    mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

    Our artillery shelled their trenches from

    half an hour, breaking them up, and then

    we made a charge, and they started with

    their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

    venced in the face of a shower of bullets,

    and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

    and advance about five miles.  We lost

    heavily, but nothing compared with them.

    We lost most of our men from their artil-

    ery firing into our trenches and stopping

    our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

    our wounded going out and stretcher

    hearers were killed.  Our generals said they 

    never saw men so cool under shell fire as

    we were. Our regiment lost about half the

    battalion and six officers. I am thankful to

    say I got safely out of this engagement too.

    I can account for putting a few of the

    brutes out of actions. I have not seen any

    of the Goole Territorials yet, but I know

    they will do their bit when called upon. All



  • November 1, 2018 11:32:32 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    missingne. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    missingade what we had to take, and wemissing

    .the text continues on the left column.

    week's rest before we went in, to get fit.

    We went into the trenches on Saturday

    night, as the bombardment was due to com-

    mence on Sunday morning at four o'clock.

    Our artillery shelled their trenches from

    half an hour, breaking them up, and then

    we made a charge, and they started with

    their Maxim guns and rapid fire.  We ad-

    venced in the face of a shower of bullets,

    and shifted the Germans out of the trench,

    and advance about five miles.  We lost

    heavily, but nothing compared with them.

    We lost most of our men from their artil-

    ery firing into our trenches and stopping

    our reinforcements coming up.   Many of

    our wounded going out and strecher



  • November 1, 2018 11:28:45 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    missingne. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    missingade what we had to take, and wemissing

    .the text continues on the left column.

    week's rest before we went in,


  • November 1, 2018 11:27:00 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    missingne. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was

    missingade what we had to take, and wemissing

    ..




  • November 1, 2018 11:25:58 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    missingne. After that we started going into the

    trenches again - three days in and and three

    days out; but we shifted a little further

    up the line into some fresh trenches, and

    we were in these for eight weeks, preparing

    for an attack made on the 9th May. We

    were told two days before the charge was




  • November 1, 2018 11:24:02 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had a week's rest to get put up to'

    our proper strength again.  We lost 700

    men and all our officers except two.  We

    were inspected by Field-Marshal General

    missingench a fortnight later, and he gave us a

    good word for the gallant work we had

    missingne. After




  • November 1, 2018 11:21:30 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had 




  • November 1, 2018 11:15:34 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 

    trenches we took before we took the village,

    the Germans had feather beds, pots and

    pans, and all sorts of furniture, and even

    women's clothes were found in their dug-

    missing. It was terrible to see our poor fellows

    who were wounded, and the stretcher-

    bearers who were attending to them, get-

    missing blown to pieces by the German artil-

    ery as they were going to the first-said

    missingation.  I came out of it safe and well, 

    and we had




  • November 1, 2018 11:12:15 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 strong

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 





  • November 1, 2018 11:11:50 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was in the firing line. After being at the

    front just a week, he joined in the battle of

    Neuve Chapelle, and so terrible  was this

    engagement that his regiment, 1150 stron

    missing the start, came out with only 400 men.

    Other regiments lost equally heavily. Priv.

    Duesbury writes: - ''I thank God He spared 

    me to get safely out of it. No one can

    missingmissingmissing what batttkeflied is like:

    missing until they see it with their own eyes.

    missing they realise the real thing.  In the 




  • November 1, 2018 11:07:26 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),

    and has been at the front since March 3rds.

    He was in Germany on the L & Y. P.

    steamer Douglas, at Hamburg, at the begin

    ning of August, and the vessel had some

    difficultly to get away.  However, they left

    the Elbe on August Bank Holiday, and

    when they arrived at Goole the boat was

    missing up. Duesbury went to work at Not-

    tingham gasworks, and remained until Nov.

    missingand , when he enlisted, and was sent to

    Plymouth for training.  In five months he

    was 




  • November 1, 2018 10:59:26 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

    .left column.

    BATTLES

    John Duesbury of

    is in the 1st Battalion Sher-

    wood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment),




  • November 1, 2018 10:31:42 Marina Yerali Christodoulou

Description

Save description
  • 49.914518||2.2707095||

    Somme

  • 50.247805||2.938883||

    Artois, France

Location(s)
  • Document location Somme
  • Additional document location Artois, France


ID
17050 / 201618
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
Kenneth Duesbery, great nephew of John
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


  • English

  • Naval Warfare
  • Western Front

  • Artillery
  • Home Front
  • Remembrance
  • Trench Life



Notes and questions

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