Pasko Rogulj: Austro-Hungarian Prisoner of Japanese, item 21

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 On top outside the page 

BY  ...  DATE March 15, 1962

 

 On page

-2-

 

extremely close to each other on an elevated platform in the privates'

quarters which runs along each side of the building;  in the middle

of the building instead of a wooden floor is a gravel walk, where the

tables for eating and workigng purposes are placed.

                 The men all seemed sufficiently clothed;  I was informed that

they had all brought with them at least two pairs of boots and twoosuits

of heavy clothing from Tsingtao;  for the hot months the Government

provides the en with lighter wear.  Each private has six blankets,

and the buildings where the men live are all during daytime well warmed.

                 The officers all purchase their own food.  The other prisoners

have generally tea and bread in the morning, fish or meat or soup, with

vegetables or potatoes at noon, and meat with tea and bread at night.

Most of the prisoners seemed in good physical condition, and the health

of the camp has continued good since its removal to Aonagahara, At

the time of my visit the camp hospital ward, which is well fitted out,

contained three men, one of whom was gravelly ill with kidney trouble,

the other two having minor complaints.

                 On my round of the camp, I visited first the officers' quarters.

Major Drachenthal told me after a few words that if I would ask to speak

with Petty-Officer Hennig, I couldobtain from him a comprehensive list

of the men's complaints.  When I did meet Pet-Officer Hennig he handed

me a typewritten list of complaints, which I asked permission of the

Commander to take with me.  This he agreed to do if I would give him

time to have a translation of thelist made.  The Commander seemed much

annoyed by the incident, and said he had no idea that there was any

ground for complaints.

                 When he had looked the list of complaints over, the Commander

told me that so far as the complaints about the striking of prisoners

were concerned, they were ridiculously exaggerated:  that at no time

had a prisoner been struck by a guard, but had only at most been given

a slight push.  The other complaints were largely admitted to be correct

 

Transcription saved

 On top outside the page 

BY  ...  DATE March 15, 1962

 

 On page

-2-

 

extremely close to each other on an elevated platform in the privates'

quarters which runs along each side of the building;  in the middle

of the building instead of a wooden floor is a gravel walk, where the

tables for eating and workigng purposes are placed.

                 The men all seemed sufficiently clothed;  I was informed that

they had all brought with them at least two pairs of boots and twoosuits

of heavy clothing from Tsingtao;  for the hot months the Government

provides the en with lighter wear.  Each private has six blankets,

and the buildings where the men live are all during daytime well warmed.

                 The officers all purchase their own food.  The other prisoners

have generally tea and bread in the morning, fish or meat or soup, with

vegetables or potatoes at noon, and meat with tea and bread at night.

Most of the prisoners seemed in good physical condition, and the health

of the camp has continued good since its removal to Aonagahara, At

the time of my visit the camp hospital ward, which is well fitted out,

contained three men, one of whom was gravelly ill with kidney trouble,

the other two having minor complaints.

                 On my round of the camp, I visited first the officers' quarters.

Major Drachenthal told me after a few words that if I would ask to speak

with Petty-Officer Hennig, I couldobtain from him a comprehensive list

of the men's complaints.  When I did meet Pet-Officer Hennig he handed

me a typewritten list of complaints, which I asked permission of the

Commander to take with me.  This he agreed to do if I would give him

time to have a translation of thelist made.  The Commander seemed much

annoyed by the incident, and said he had no idea that there was any

ground for complaints.

                 When he had looked the list of complaints over, the Commander

told me that so far as the complaints about the striking of prisoners

were concerned, they were ridiculously exaggerated:  that at no time

had a prisoner been struck by a guard, but had only at most been given

a slight push.  The other complaints were largely admitted to be correct

 


Transcription history
  • September 6, 2017 18:45:25 Eva Anna Welles (AUT)

     On top outside the page 

    BY  ...  DATE March 15, 1962

     

     On page

    -2-

     

    extremely close to each other on an elevated platform in the privates'

    quarters which runs along each side of the building;  in the middle

    of the building instead of a wooden floor is a gravel walk, where the

    tables for eating and workigng purposes are placed.

                     The men all seemed sufficiently clothed;  I was informed that

    they had all brought with them at least two pairs of boots and twoosuits

    of heavy clothing from Tsingtao;  for the hot months the Government

    provides the en with lighter wear.  Each private has six blankets,

    and the buildings where the men live are all during daytime well warmed.

                     The officers all purchase their own food.  The other prisoners

    have generally tea and bread in the morning, fish or meat or soup, with

    vegetables or potatoes at noon, and meat with tea and bread at night.

    Most of the prisoners seemed in good physical condition, and the health

    of the camp has continued good since its removal to Aonagahara, At

    the time of my visit the camp hospital ward, which is well fitted out,

    contained three men, one of whom was gravelly ill with kidney trouble,

    the other two having minor complaints.

                     On my round of the camp, I visited first the officers' quarters.

    Major Drachenthal told me after a few words that if I would ask to speak

    with Petty-Officer Hennig, I couldobtain from him a comprehensive list

    of the men's complaints.  When I did meet Pet-Officer Hennig he handed

    me a typewritten list of complaints, which I asked permission of the

    Commander to take with me.  This he agreed to do if I would give him

    time to have a translation of thelist made.  The Commander seemed much

    annoyed by the incident, and said he had no idea that there was any

    ground for complaints.

                     When he had looked the list of complaints over, the Commander

    told me that so far as the complaints about the striking of prisoners

    were concerned, they were ridiculously exaggerated:  that at no time

    had a prisoner been struck by a guard, but had only at most been given

    a slight push.  The other complaints were largely admitted to be correct

     


  • March 17, 2017 15:34:45 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    BY  ...  DATE March 15, 1962

     

     On page

    -2-


    extremely close to each other on an elevated platform in the privates'

    quarters which runs along each side of the building;  in the middle

    of the building instead of a wooden floor is a gravel walk, where the

    tables for eating and workigg purposes are placed.

                     The men all seemed sufficiently clothed;  I was informed that

    they had all brought with them at least two pairs of boots and twoosuits

    of heavy clothing from Tsingtao;  for the hot months the Government

    provides the en with lighter wear.  Each private has six blankets,

    and the buildings where the men live are all during daytime well warmed.

                     The officers all purchase their own food.  The other prisoners

    have generally tea and bread in the morning, fish or meat or soup, with

    vegetables or potatoes at noon, and meat with tea and bread at night.

    Most of the prisoners seemed in good physical condition, and the health

    of the camp has continued good since its removal to Aonagahara, At

    the time of my visit the camp hospital ward, which is well fitted out,

    contained three men, one of whom was gravelly ill with kidney trouble,

    the other two having minor complaints.

                     On my round of the camp, I visited first the officers' quarters.

    Major Drachenthal told me after a few words that if I would ask to speak

    with Petty-Officer Hennig, I couldobtain from him a comprehensive list

    of the men's complaints.  When I did meet Pet-Officer Hennig he handed

    me a typewritten list of complaints, which I asked permission of the

    Commander to take with me.  This he agreed to do if I would give him

    time to have a translation of thelist made.  The Commander seemed much

    annoyed by the incident, and said he had no idea that there was any

    ground for complaints.

                     When he had looked the list of complaints over, the Commander

    told me that so far as the complaints about the striking of prisoners

    were concerned, they were ridiculously exaggerated:  that at no time

    had a prisoner been struck by a guard, but had only at most been given

    a slight push.  The other complaints were largely admitted to be correct



  • March 17, 2017 15:29:26 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    BY  ...  DATE March 15, 1962

     

     On page

    -2-


    extremely close to each other on an elevated platform in the privates'

    quarters which runs along each side of the building;  in the middle

    of the building instead of a wooden floor is a gravel walk, where the

    tables for eating and workigg purposes are placed.

                     The men all seemed sufficiently clothed;  I was informed that

    they had all brought with them at least two pairs of boots and twoosuits

    of heavy clothing from Tsingtao;  for the hot months the Government

    provides the en with lighter wear.  Each private has six blankets,

    and the buildings where the men live are all during daytime well warmed.

                     The officers all purchase their own food.  The other prisoners

    have generally tea and bread in the morning, fish or meat or soup, with

    vegetables or potatoes at noon, and meat with tea and bread at night.

    Most of the prisoners seemed in good physical condition, and the health

    of the camp has continued good since its removal to Aonagahara, At

    the time of my visit the camp hospital ward, which is well fitted out,

    contained three men, one of whom was gravelly ill with kidney trouble,

    the other two having minor complaints.

                     On my round of the camp, I visited first the officers' quarters.

    Major Drachenthal told me after a few words that if I would ask to speak

    with Petty-Officer Hennig, I couldobtain from him a comprehensive list

    of the men's complaints.  When I did meet Pet-Officer Hennig he handed

    me a typewritten list of complaints, which I asked permission of the

    Commander to take with me.  This he agreed to do if I would give him

    time to have a translation of thelist made.  The Commander seemed much

    annoyed by the incident, and said he had no idea that there was any

    ground for complaints.



  • March 17, 2017 15:29:15 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    BY  ...  DATE March 15, 1962

     

     On page

    -2-


    extremely close to each other on an elevated platform in the privates'

    quarters which runs along each side of the building;  in the middle

    of the building instead of a wooden floor is a gravel walk, where the

    tables for eating and workigg purposes are placed.

                     The men all seemed sufficiently clothed;  I was informed that

    they had all brought with them at least two pairs of boots and twoosuits

    of heavy clothing from Tsingtao;  for the hot months the Government

    provides the en with lighter wear.  Each private has six blankets,

    and the buildings where the men live are all during daytime well warmed.

                     The officers all purchase their own food.  The other prisoners

    have generally tea and bread in the morning, fish or meat or soup, with

    vegetables or potatoes at noon, and meat with tea and bread at night.

    Most of the prisoners seemed in good physical condition, and the health

    of the camp has continued good since its removal to Aonagahara, At

    the time of my visit the camp hospital ward, which is well fitted out,

    contained three men, one of whom was gravelly ill with kidney trouble,

    the other two having minor complaints.

                     On my round of the camp, I visited first the officers' quarters.

    Major Drachenthal told me after a few words that if I would ask to speak

    with Petty-Officer Hennig, I couldobtain from him a comprehensive list

    of the men's complaints.  When I did meet Pet-Officer Hennig he handed

    me a typewritten list of complaints, which I asked permission of the

    Commander to take with me.  This he agreed to do if I would give him

    time to have a translation of thelist made.  The Commander seemed much

    annoyed by the incident, and said he had no idea that there was any



  • March 17, 2017 15:28:56 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    BY  ...  DATE March 15, 1962

     

     On page

    -2-


    extremely close to each other on an elevated platform in the privates'

    quarters which runs along each side of the building;  in the middle

    of the building instead of a wooden floor is a gravel walk, where the

    tables for eating and workigg purposes are placed.

                     The men all seemed sufficiently clothed;  I was informed that

    they had all brought with them at least two pairs of boots and twoosuits

    of heavy clothing from Tsingtao;  for the hot months the Government

    provides the en with lighter wear.  Each private has six blankets,

    and the buildings where the men live are all during daytime well warmed.

                     The officers all purchase their own food.  The other prisoners

    have generally tea and bread in the morning, fish or meat or soup, with

    vegetables or potatoes at noon, and meat with tea and bread at night.

    Most of the prisoners seemed in good physical condition, and the health

    of the camp has continued good since its removal to Aonagahara, At

    the time of my visit the camp hospital ward, which is well fitted out,

    contained three men, one of whom was gravelly ill with kidney trouble,

    the other two having minor complaints.

                     On my round of the camp, I visited first the officers' quarters.

    Major Drachenthal told me after a few words that if I would ask to speak

    with Petty-Officer Hennig, I couldobtain from him a comprehensive list

    of the men's complaints.  When I did meet Pet-Officer Hennig he handed

    me a typewritten list of complaints, which I asked permission of the

    Commander to take with me.  This he agreed to do if I would give him

    time to have a translation of thelist made.  The Commander seemed much



  • March 17, 2017 15:28:17 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    BY  ...  DATE March 15, 1962

     

     On page

    -2-


    extremely close to each other on an elevated platform in the privates'

    quarters which runs along each side of the building;  in the middle

    of the building instead of a wooden floor is a gravel walk, where the

    tables for eating and workigg purposes are placed.

                     The men all seemed sufficiently clothed;  I was informed that

    they had all brought with them at least two pairs of boots and twoosuits

    of heavy clothing from Tsingtao;  for the hot months the Government

    provides the en with lighter wear.  Each private has six blankets,

    and the buildings where the men live are all during daytime well warmed.

                     The officers all purchase their own food.  The other prisoners

    have generally tea and bread in the morning, fish or meat or soup, with

    vegetables or potatoes at noon, and meat with tea and bread at night.

    Most of the prisoners seemed in good physical condition, and the health

    of the camp has continued good since its removal to Aonagahara, At

    the time of my visit the camp hospital ward, which is well fitted out,

    contained three men, one of whom was gravelly ill with kidney trouble,

    the other two having minor complaints.

                     On my round of the camp, I visited first the officers' quarters.

    Major Drachenthal told me after a few words that if I would ask to speak

    with Petty-Officer Hennig, I couldobtain from him a comprehensive list

    of the men's complaints.  When I did meet Pet-Officer Hennig he handed

    me a typewritten list of complaints, which I asked permission of the

    Commander


  • March 17, 2017 15:24:39 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    BY  ...  DATE March 15, 1962

     

     On page

    -2-


    extremely close to each other on an elevated platform in the privates'

    quarters which runs along each side of the building;  in the middle

    of the building instead of a wooden floor is a gravel walk, where the

    tables for eating and workigg purposes are placed.

                     The men all seemed sufficiently clothed;  I was informed that

    they had all brought with them at least two pairs of boots and twoosuits

    of heavy clothing from Tsingtao;  for the hot months the Government

    provides the en with lighter wear.  Each private has six blankets,

    and the buildings where the men live are all during daytime well warmed.

                     The officers all purchase their own food.  The other prisoners

    have generally tea and bread in the morning, fish or meat or soup, with



  • March 17, 2017 15:18:55 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    BY  ...  DATE March 15, 1962

     

     On page

    -2-


    extremely close to each other on an elevated platform in the privates'

    quarters which runs along each side of the building;  in the middle

    of the building instead of a wooden floor is a gravel walk, where the

    tables for eating and workigg purposes are placed.


Description

Save description
  • 34.88252976129634||134.9361809790039||

    Aonogahara

  • 36.05572896407991||120.31617604711914||

    Tsingtau (Qingdao 青岛市)

    ||1
Location(s)
  • Story location Tsingtau (Qingdao 青岛市)
  • Document location Aonogahara


ID
13354 / 136098
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
Gerald H. Davis
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



  • Naval Warfare

  • Prisoners of War



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