Pasko Rogulj: Austro-Hungarian Prisoner of Japanese, item 20

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 On top outside the page 

763.72114/1491

 Summer  Willis (3rd Sec in Tokyo Embassy) to

George W. Guthrie (US Ambassador Tokyo)

March 21, 1916

 

 On page 

                                      AONAGAHARA

                 I have the honor to inform you that I arrived at Aonagahara at

12 o'clock on March 3rd.  The camp is situated some five miles from the

station on a high open plain, it is comparatively new, the prisoners

having been moved here from Himeji. Where they had been lodged in a

temple ground and where the space for exercise was not sufficient, a

few months ago.

                 I was not at the entrance to the camp by the Commander and the

representative of the Garrison Commander.  The prison enclosure, in

which are confined altogether 413 men, is large, and opens on a large

field where the men are daily permitted to play games.  Within the enclosure

are two tennis courts for the use of the officers.  On one side

is a separate house of pine boards with cement flooring where the eight

captive offices are lodged.  Major Drachenthal, the senior of these,

occupies a separate room, the other officer sharing rooms.  They have

a messroom, and separate and exceedingly well-kept kitchen and bath

quarters.  They have moreover their orderlies to wait on them and to

cook for them.  The buildings of the petty officers, non-commissioned

officers, and privates, are situated in rows in the rest of the enclosure.

Fifty privates and non-commissioned officers are in each

building, with five petty officers occupying a square room at each end

of these buildings.  These are in dimension about 100 feet by 5 feet

each.  There is also a large cement floored kitchen where cooking is

done for the whole number, and there is a canteen open daily for three

hours.  The baths and sanitary arrangements are excellent.

                 The officers are allowed to provide themselves with what furniture

they want;  the men, however, are allowed to use only the regulation

straw mattresses for their bedding.  These mattresses are placed

extremely close  to each 

 

 

Transcription saved

 On top outside the page 

763.72114/1491

 Summer  Willis (3rd Sec in Tokyo Embassy) to

George W. Guthrie (US Ambassador Tokyo)

March 21, 1916

 

 On page 

                                      AONAGAHARA

                 I have the honor to inform you that I arrived at Aonagahara at

12 o'clock on March 3rd.  The camp is situated some five miles from the

station on a high open plain, it is comparatively new, the prisoners

having been moved here from Himeji. Where they had been lodged in a

temple ground and where the space for exercise was not sufficient, a

few months ago.

                 I was not at the entrance to the camp by the Commander and the

representative of the Garrison Commander.  The prison enclosure, in

which are confined altogether 413 men, is large, and opens on a large

field where the men are daily permitted to play games.  Within the enclosure

are two tennis courts for the use of the officers.  On one side

is a separate house of pine boards with cement flooring where the eight

captive offices are lodged.  Major Drachenthal, the senior of these,

occupies a separate room, the other officer sharing rooms.  They have

a messroom, and separate and exceedingly well-kept kitchen and bath

quarters.  They have moreover their orderlies to wait on them and to

cook for them.  The buildings of the petty officers, non-commissioned

officers, and privates, are situated in rows in the rest of the enclosure.

Fifty privates and non-commissioned officers are in each

building, with five petty officers occupying a square room at each end

of these buildings.  These are in dimension about 100 feet by 5 feet

each.  There is also a large cement floored kitchen where cooking is

done for the whole number, and there is a canteen open daily for three

hours.  The baths and sanitary arrangements are excellent.

                 The officers are allowed to provide themselves with what furniture

they want;  the men, however, are allowed to use only the regulation

straw mattresses for their bedding.  These mattresses are placed

extremely close  to each 

 

 


Transcription history
  • March 17, 2017 15:11:39 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    763.72114/1491

     Summer  Willis (3rd Sec in Tokyo Embassy) to

    George W. Guthrie (US Ambassador Tokyo)

    March 21, 1916

     

     On page 

                                          AONAGAHARA

                     I have the honor to inform you that I arrived at Aonagahara at

    12 o'clock on March 3rd.  The camp is situated some five miles from the

    station on a high open plain, it is comparatively new, the prisoners

    having been moved here from Himeji. Where they had been lodged in a

    temple ground and where the space for exercise was not sufficient, a

    few months ago.

                     I was not at the entrance to the camp by the Commander and the

    representative of the Garrison Commander.  The prison enclosure, in

    which are confined altogether 413 men, is large, and opens on a large

    field where the men are daily permitted to play games.  Within the enclosure

    are two tennis courts for the use of the officers.  On one side

    is a separate house of pine boards with cement flooring where the eight

    captive offices are lodged.  Major Drachenthal, the senior of these,

    occupies a separate room, the other officer sharing rooms.  They have

    a messroom, and separate and exceedingly well-kept kitchen and bath

    quarters.  They have moreover their orderlies to wait on them and to

    cook for them.  The buildings of the petty officers, non-commissioned

    officers, and privates, are situated in rows in the rest of the enclosure.

    Fifty privates and non-commissioned officers are in each

    building, with five petty officers occupying a square room at each end

    of these buildings.  These are in dimension about 100 feet by 5 feet

    each.  There is also a large cement floored kitchen where cooking is

    done for the whole number, and there is a canteen open daily for three

    hours.  The baths and sanitary arrangements are excellent.

                     The officers are allowed to provide themselves with what furniture

    they want;  the men, however, are allowed to use only the regulation

    straw mattresses for their bedding.  These mattresses are placed

    extremely close  to each 

     

     

  • March 17, 2017 15:09:11 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    763.72114/1491

    Summer Willis (3rd Sec in Tokyo Embassy) to

    George W. Guthrie (US Ambassador Tokyo)

    March 21, 1916

     

     On page 

                                          AONAGAHARA

                     I have the honor to inform you that I arrived at Aonagahara at

    12 o'clock on March 3rd.  The camp is situated some five miles from the

    station on a high open plain, it is comparatively new, the prisoners

    having been moved here from Himeji. Where they had been lodged in a

    temple ground and where the space for exercise was not sufficient, a

    few months ago.

                     I was not at the entrance to the camp by the Commander and the

    representative of the Garrison Commander.  The prison enclosure, in

    which are confined altogether 413 men, is large, and opens on a large

    field where the men are daily permitted to play games.  Within the enclosure

    are two tennis courts for the use of the officers.  On one side

    is a separate house of pine boards with cement flooring where the eight

    captive offices are lodged.  Major Drachenthal, the senior of these,

    occupies a separate room, the other officer sharing rooms.  They have

    a messroom, and separate and exceedingly well-kept kitchen and bath

    quarters.  They have moreover their orderlies to wait on them and to

    cook for them.  The buildings of the petty officers, non-commissioned

    officers, and privates, are situated in rows in the rest of the enclosure.

    Fifty privates and non-commissioned officers are in each

    building, with five petty officers occupying a square room at each end

    of these buildings.  These are in dimension about 100 feet by 5 feet

    each.  There is also a large cement floored kitchen where cooking is

    done for the whole number, and there is a canteen open daily for three

    hours.  The baths and sanitary arrangements are excellent.

                     The officers are allowed to provide themselves with what furniture

    they want;  the men, however, are allowed to use only the regulation

    straw mattresses for their bedding.  These mattresses are placed

    extremely close  to each 

     

     


  • March 17, 2017 14:58:59 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    763.72114/1491

    Summer Willis ((3rd Sec in Tokyo Embassy) to

    George W. Suthru (US Ambassador Tokyo)

    March 21, 1916


     On page 

                                          AONAGAHARA

                     I have the honor to inform you that I arrived at Aonagahara at

    12 o'clock on March 3rd.  The camp is situated some five miles from the

    station on a high open plain, it is comparatively new, the prisoners

    having been moved here from Himeji. Where they had been lodged in a

    temple ground and where the space for exercise was not sufficient, a

    few months ago.

                     I was not at the entrance to the camp by the Commander and the

    representative of the Garrison Commander.  The prison enclosure, in

    which are confined altogether 413 men, is large, and opens on a large

    field where the men are daily permitted to play games.  Within the enclosure

    are two tennis courts for the use of the officers.  On one side

    is a separate house of pine boards with cement flooring where the eight

    captive offices are lodged.  Major Drachenthal, the senior of these,

    occupies a separate room, the other officer sharing rooms.  They have

    a messroom, and separate and exceedingly well-kept kitchen and bath

    quarters.  They have moreover their orderlies to wait on them and to

    cook for them.  The buildings of the petty officers, non-commissioned

    officers, and privates, are situated in rows in the rest of the enclosure.

    Fifty privates and non-commissioned officers are in each

    building, with five petty officers occupying a square room at each end

    of these buildings.  These are in dimension about 100 feet by 5 feet

    each.  There is also a large cement floored kitchen where cooking is

    done for the whole number, and there is a canteen open daily for three

    hours.  The baths and sanitary arrangements are excellent.

                     The officers are allowed to provide themselves with what furniture

    they want;  the men, however, are allowed to use only the regulation

    straw mattresses for their bedding.  These mattresses are placed

    extremely close  to each 




  • March 17, 2017 14:56:49 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    763.72114/1491

    Summer Willis ((3rd Sec in Tokyo Embassy) to

    George W. Suthru (US Ambassador Tokyo)

    March 21, 1916


     On page 

                                          AONAGAHARA

                     I have the honor to inform you that I arrived at Aonagahara at

    12 o'clock on March 3rd.  The camp is situated some five miles from the

    station on a high open plain, it is comparatively new, the prisoners

    having been moved here from Himeji. Where they had been lodged in a

    temple ground and where the space for exercise was not sufficient, a

    few months ago.

                     I was not at the entrance to the camp by the Commander and the

    representative of the Garrison Commander.  The prison enclosure, in

    which are confined altogether 413 men, is large, and opens on a large

    field where the men are daily permitted to play games.  Within the enclosure

    are two tennis courts for the use of the officers.  On one side

    is a separate house of pine boards with cement flooring where the eight

    captive offices are lodged.  Major Drachenthal, the senior of these,

    occupies a separate room, the other officer sharing rooms.  They have

    a messroom, and separate and exceedingly well-kept kitchen and bath

    quarters.  They have moreover their orderlies to wait on them and to

    cook for them.  The buildings of the petty officers, non-commissioned

    officers, and privates, are situated in rows in the rest of the enclosure.

    Fifty privates and non-commissioned officers are in each

    building, with five petty officers occupying a square room at each end

    of these buildings.  These are in dimension about 100 feet by 5 feet

    each.  There is also a large cement floored kitchen where cooking is





  • March 17, 2017 14:54:50 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    763.72114/1491

    Summer Willis ((3rd Sec in Tokyo Embassy) to

    George W. Suthru (US Ambassador Tokyo)

    March 21, 1916


     On page 

                                          AONAGAHARA

                     I have the honor to inform you that I arrived at Aonagahara at

    12 o'clock on March 3rd.  The camp is situated some five miles from the

    station on a high open plain, it is comparatively new, the prisoners

    having been moved here from Himeji. Where they had been lodged in a

    temple ground and where the space for exercise was not sufficient, a

    few months ago.

                     I was not at the entrance to the camp by the Commander and the

    representative of the Garrison Commander.  The prison enclosure, in

    which are confined altogether 413 men, is large, and opens on a large

    field where the men are daily permitted to play games.  Within the enclosure

    are two tennis courts for the use of the officers.  On one side

    is a separate house of pine boards with cement flooring where the eight

    captive offices are lodged.  Major Drachenthal, the senior of these,

    occupies a separate room, the other officer sharing rooms.  They have

    a messroom, and separate and exceedingly well-kept kitchen and bath

    quarters.  They have moreover their orderlies to wait on them and to

    cook for them.  The buildings




  • March 17, 2017 14:52:08 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    763.72114/1491

    Summer Willis ((3rd Sec in Tokyo Embassy) to

    George W. Suthru (US Ambassador Tokyo)

    March 21, 1916


     On page 

                                          AONAGAHARA

                     I have the honor to inform you that I arrived at Aonagahara at

    12 o'clock on March 3rd.  The camp is situated some five miles from the

    station on a high open plain, it is comparatively new, the prisoners

    having been moved here from Himeji. Where they had been lodged in a

    temple ground and where the space for exercise was not sufficient, a

    few months ago.

                     I was not at the entrance to the camp by the Commander and the

    representative of the Garrison Commander.  The prison enclosure, in

    which are confined altogether 413 men, is large, and opens on a large

    field where the men are daily permitted to play games. Within the entrance




  • March 17, 2017 14:50:20 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    763.72114/1491

    Summer Willis ((3rd Sec in Tokyo Embassy) to

    George W. Suthru (US Ambassador Tokyo)

    March 21, 1916


     On page 

                              AONAGAHARA

    I have the honor to inform you that I arrived at Aonagahara at

    12 o'clock on March 3rd.  The camp is situated some five miles from the

    station on a high open plain, it is comparatively new, the prisoners

    having been moved here from Himeji. Where they had been lodged in a

    temple ground and where the space for exercise was not sufficient, a

    few months ago.





  • March 17, 2017 14:48:34 Lucas Diaz

     On top outside the page 

    763.72114/1491

    Summer Willis ((3rd Sec in Tokyo Embassy) to

    George W. Suthru (US Ambassador Tokyo)

    March 21, 1916


     On page 

                              AONAGAHARA




Description

Save description
  • 34.90871779853429||134.92193308471678||

    Aonogahara

  • 36.05572896407991||120.31617604711914||

    Tsingtau (Qingdao 青岛市)

    ||1
Location(s)
  • Story location Tsingtau (Qingdao 青岛市)
  • Document location Aonogahara


ID
13354 / 136097
Source
http://europeana1914-1918.eu/...
Contributor
Gerald H. Davis
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



  • Naval Warfare

  • Prisoners of War



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